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eBook Gospel According to Luke X-XXIV (Anchor Bible) ePub

eBook Gospel According to Luke X-XXIV (Anchor Bible) ePub

by Joseph A. Fitzmyer

  • ISBN: 0385516010
  • Category: Bible Study and Reference
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Joseph A. Fitzmyer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Anchor Bible (July 18, 2000)
  • Pages: 840
  • ePub book: 1499 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1432 kb
  • Other: mobi lit azw doc
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 495

Description

spel According to Luke X-XXIV is Volume 28A in the Anchor Bible series of new book-by-book translations of the Old . This is the conclusion of Joseph A. Fitzmyer's two-volume study of Luke

spel According to Luke X-XXIV is Volume 28A in the Anchor Bible series of new book-by-book translations of the Old and New Testaments and Apocrypha. Fitzmyer's two-volume study of Luke. Included here is Fitzmyer's work on chapter 10, in which Jesus continues his journey to Jerusalem, through chapter 24, his Resurrection and appearances.

The Gospel According to Luke 1–9. Anchor Yale Bible. Brown, Raymond Edward; Fitzmyer, Joseph A; Murphy, Roland Edmund (1990). 28. New York: Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-3850-0515-9. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

The Anchor Bible series is a bit uneven, but some of the volumes are magisterial - including Fitzmyer on Luke .

The Anchor Bible series is a bit uneven, but some of the volumes are magisterial - including Fitzmyer on Luke and Raymond Brown on John and the Johannine Epistles. Very much worth the effort to find.

This is the conclusion of Joseph A. Fitzmyer's two-volume study of Luke

This is the conclusion of Joseph A. a benchmark in Lucan studies. Pages: 848 Publisher: Doubleday Published: 1985 ISBN-10: 0385155425 ISBN-13: 9780385155427.

The Gospel According to Luke X-XXIV is Volume 28A in the Anchor Bible series of new book-by-book translations of the Old and New Testaments and Apocrypha  . Anchor Bible Series Joseph A. Fitzmyer.

according to Luke X-XXIV (The Anchor Bible, 28a), New York: Doubleday, 1985. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution. 124 A. Fitzmyer, The Gospel according to Luke X-XXIV (The Anchor Bible, 28a), New York: Doubleday, 1985.

Published July 18th 2000 by Anchor Bible (first published January 1st 1985).

Fitzmyer's exposition of Luke helps modern-day Christians hear the Good News afresh & understand it like never before. Published July 18th 2000 by Anchor Bible (first published January 1st 1985). The Gospel According to Luke X-XXIV.

DJG. Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels. According to the Bible Abraham came from Haran about 2000. J. Zarins, Camel, in The Anchor. Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels Scribal Culture and the Making of the Hebrew Bible. The Weightier Matters of the Torah. Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary. Righteousness by JJ Scullion.

Fitzmyer’s exposition of Luke helps modern-day Christians hear the Good News afresh and understand it like never before

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 09 September 2014. Recommend this journal.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 09 September 2014.

In this second of two volumes on the Gospel According to Luke, beginning with chapter 10, Joseph A. Fitzmyer builds on the exhaustive introduction, definitive new translation, and extensive notes and commentary presented in his first volume. Fitzmyer brings to the task his mastery of ancient and modern languages, his encyclopedic knowledge of the sources, and his intimate acquaintance with the questions and issues raised by the third Synoptic Gospel.In “joining the spirit to the letter” and scholarship to faith, this two-volume commentary on Luke has, as the Journal of Biblical Literature predicted, “rapidly and deservedly become the standard work on Luke.” Luke’s unique literary and linguistic features, its relation to the other Gospels and the book of Acts, and its distinctive theological slant are discussed in detail by the author. The Jesus of Luke’s Gospel speaks to the Greco-Roman world of first-century Christians, giving the followers of Jesus a reason for remaining faithful. Fitzmyer’s exposition of Luke helps modern-day Christians hear the Good News afresh and understand it like never before.

Comments

Ieslyaenn Ieslyaenn
This is the second of a two-volume set. I have owned both of them for over 20 years. These are primarily reference books of a technical and seasonal nature. They are like a companion that you don't see for a while but reacquaint yourself with periodically. Every three years, when the Catholic Church is in Cycle C of the Lectionary, the readings are primarily from Luke's gospel. These are great for following the Church through the weeks of this cycle. I am not a Biblical Scholar. What's more, I have only a rudimentary working knowledge of Greek and am therefore somewhat limited to the amount of research I can do. As well, I am limited by time. I have a number of other sources to use. Nevertheless, when I need strict Biblical interpretation for weekly writing or teaching, I prefer to use these volumes, before going anywhere else.

I do not regard every volume of the Anchor Bible series to be of equal weight; however, I always find myself returning to Fitzmeyer for exegesis and hermeneutics on the Gospel of Luke. His work in these volumes has stood the test of time. Nothing like them has come along during this time which can compete with them in this regard.

As I look at these volumes within my library, maybe the greatest compliment I can give Fitzmeyer is that the books look used and the dust jackets worn over the years. I have appreciated and valued his scholarship.
Beazezius Beazezius
`The Gospel According to Luke I - IX' and `The Gospel According to Luke X - XXIV' by Professor Joseph Fitzmyer comprises the `Anchor Bible' series commentary on the Gospel of Luke, the third Evangelist. The very best thing I can say about this work is that virtually every other commentary, from all ends of the spectrum, cites this work as a reliable authority on the subject. One should still take some care before investing in the purchase of a copy of these two relatively pricy volumes.
The first consideration is that you may actually have trouble finding the first volume, as it appears to be out of print. I was lucky enough to get it from an alternate source available through Amazon, and I'm quite happy to have acquired it, as it lives up to its reputation in every way. But here we meet a second consideration. This is the fact that this great work, weighing in at over 1600 pages, is at the highly scholarly end of the spectrum of Gospel commentaries. The only work which may be larger is the three volume study by John Nolland in the `Word Biblical Commentary' series. Aside from being just a bit shorter, I like Fitzmyer far more than Nolland because Fitzmyer's format is far more accessible to the non-scholar. And yet, it is still a work almost exclusively for exegesis. For hermeneutics and pastoral use, most of Fitzmyer's information will only work as deep background. The lion's share of the commentary is dedicated to the study of the most basic documentary sources, lexical issues, and exegesis. For example, there are frequent references to the original Codices found from the third, fourth, and fifth centuries, and to the slight differences in text found in alternate documents. For the Bible scholar, these are necessary. For the lay Bible study student or teacher, they are a distraction. Thankfully, makes them less of a distraction than Nolland and the rather Byzantine structure of the texts in the `Word' series.
With great humility, I may also suggest that Fitzmyer's translation of the Gospel tends to the `politically correct', as when he translates the Greek word for `slave' as `servant'. The NRSV translates this as `slave' and in the Greek text; the dominant meaning is `slave' according to both a Greek dictionary and the `Dictionary of New Testament Theology'.
In spite of all these considerations, I, a lowly amateur teacher of Bible studies, still find Fitzmyer extremely valuable (as I do Nolland, if I have time to wade through his pages.) The first and foremost value I find might be the highly valuable `serendipitous' finding. There is so much here, on can hardly help tripping over something really useful. The latest finding is a reference to a work on New Testament theology, an aspect of scriptural study which is almost totally absent from Bible commentaries. Another great value I've found is that in spite of the `politically correct' translation, I find Fitzmyer's explanations of many words, as with Jesus talking about the Pharisees' `leaven' or `yeast', his explanation is far better than any other volume. And, his use of `leaven' is probably far more accurate than `yeast', as I suspect Hellenistic science had not the faintest knowledge of these microorganisms, even though they were thoroughly familiar with natural leavening. Lastly, I find Fitzmyer's introduction to the Gospel one of the best (although Johnson's introduction (see below) is also excellent for a smaller price). This is especially unfortunate, as it appears in the hard to get first volume.
If you are looking for only pastoral guidance, I recommend Joel Green's commentary or the New Interpreter's Bible. If you want a brief of this exegesis, go for Luke Timothy Johnson's excellent commentaries on Luke (and Acts).
My last thoughts about these volumes is that they bring me back to my very first experience with Biblical exegesis and the Anchor Bible, which was launched in the late 1950s, but which seems to have fallen on hard times, as the reputation and availability of many of its volumes is thin.
นℕĨĈტℝ₦ นℕĨĈტℝ₦
This is the first of a two-volume set. I have owned both of them for over 20 years. These are primarily reference books of a technical and seasonal nature. They are like a companion that you don't see for a while but reacquaint yourself with periodically. Every three years, when the Catholic Church is in Cycle C of the Lectionary, the readings are primarily from Luke's gospel. These are great for following the Church through the weeks of this cycle. I am not a Biblical Scholar. What's more, I have only a rudimentary working knowledge of Greek and am therefore somewhat limited to the amount of research I can do. As well, I am limited by time. I have a number of other sources to use. Nevertheless, when I need strict Biblical interpretation for weekly writing or teaching, I prefer to use these volumes, before going anywhere else.

I do not regard every volume of the Anchor Bible series to be of equal weight; however, I always find myself returning to Fitzmeyer for exegesis and hermeneutics on the Gospel of Luke. His work in these volumes has stood the test of time. Nothing like them has come along during this time which can compete with them in this regard.

As I look at these volumes within my library, maybe the greatest compliment I can give Fitzmeyer is that the books look used and the dust jackets worn over the years. I have appreciated and valued his scholarship.
Larosa Larosa
Well documented and thorough. A bit difficult to read, because it is very academic. Knowledge of ancient Greek is not required, but definitely a plus.
Rleillin Rleillin
Classic commentary from one of the great 20th century biblical scholars
Qiahmagha Qiahmagha
This volume, together with its companion (Anchor Bible Vol 28A, covering Luke 10-24), is one of the finest commentaries in English on Luke's Gospel. No longer new, but still superb and worth tracking down in the used book sources (Amazon and others). The Anchor Bible series is a bit uneven, but some of the volumes are magisterial -- including Fitzmyer on Luke and Raymond Brown on John and the Johannine Epistles. Very much worth the effort to find.
Sha Sha
Jospeh Fitzmyer is one of the premier Catholic scholars, and his take on Luke's gospel shows his great scholarship. I am pleased to say I have this on my shelf and I would recommend this to any serious student of the bible. Anchor Bible always produces great works and this is no different.
Fast delivery. As advertised.