cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Social Distinctives of the Christians in the First Century: Pivotal Essays by E. A. Judge
eBook Social Distinctives of the Christians in the First Century: Pivotal Essays by E. A. Judge ePub

eBook Social Distinctives of the Christians in the First Century: Pivotal Essays by E. A. Judge ePub

by David M. Scholer,Edwin A. Judge

  • ISBN: 0801046726
  • Category: Bible Study and Reference
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: David M. Scholer,Edwin A. Judge
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Baker Academic; Reprint edition (October 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 248
  • ePub book: 1772 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1176 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 293

Description

Judge was the first in scholarship after the mid-twentieth century to clarify early Christian ideals about society by. .

Judge was the first in scholarship after the mid-twentieth century to clarify early Christian ideals about society by defining what the social institutions of the broader cultural context were and how they influenced the social institutions of the early Christian communities. David M. Scholer (1938-2008) was professor of New Testament and associate dean of the Center for Advanced Theological Studies, School of Theology, at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He published Nag Hammadi Bibliography 1949-1969, Nag Hammadi Bibliography 1970-1994, A Basic Bibliographic Guide for New Testament Exegesis, The Caring God, and many other items.

Edwin A. Judge is one Australia's most famous academics David M. Scholer (1938-2008) was professor of New Testament and associate dean of the Center for Advanced Theological Studies, School of Theology, at Fuller Theological. Judge is one Australia's most famous academics. After studying at Cambridge, Professor Judge moved to Sydney University and then on to Macquarie where he was appointed the first professor in Ancient History. For twenty-five years, and since his retirement, he has been a leader in ancient history and the study of early Christianity.

The Dynamic Character of Christian Culture: Essays on Dawsonian Themes. Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America, 1984. Volume 54 Issue 4 - Albert Rabil. Similar Items you may enjoy! The Best American Essays of the Century Author: Joyce Carol Oates, ed.

David M. Scholer, E. A. Judge. This is a collection of pivotal essays by E. Judge, who initiated many important discus?sions in the establishment of social scientific criticism of the Bible. Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound.

Edwin A. Judge is Emeritus Professor of History, Department of Ancient History, Macquarie University, Australia. Recently added by. prothumialibrary, AhimsaTravis, UBS2017, HubertSCH, Theodore. Gebretsadik, franklymydear, iangpacker, Frpeter, OpusRex.

T2 - pivotal essays by E. AU - Judge,Edwin A. AU - Scholer,David M. Py - 2008. N2 - An important collection of formative essays by E. Judge for understanding the social world of the first Christians and Paul. AB - An important collection of formative essays by E. BT - Social distinctives of the Christians in the first century. PB - Hendrickson Publishers.

Pivotal Essays by E. Judge

Pivotal Essays by E. What is it that made the work of Judge in 1960 and in subsequent years so important? Judge was the first in scholarship after the mid-twentieth century to clarify early Christian ideals about society by defining what the social institutions of the broader cultural context were and how they influenced the social institutions of the early Christian communities. Judge Judge was the first in scholarship after the mid-twentieth century to clarify. Judge, who initiated many important discussions in the establishment of social scientific criticism of the Bible.

This is a collection of pivotal essays by E. A. Judge, who initiated many important discussions in the establishment of social scientific criticism of the Bible. What is it that made the work of Judge in 1960 and in subsequent years so important? Judge was the first in scholarship after the mid-twentieth century to clarify early Christian ideals about society by defining what the social institutions of the broader cultural context were and how they influenced the social institutions of the early Christian communities. Judge points out that earlier scholars had entered into this field of inquiry, but that, in general, they failed due to the lack of careful definitions of the Greco-Roman social institutions at the time based on a thorough use of the primary sources.Thus, Judge was the "new founder" ( a turning point in scholarship) of what came to be called social-scientific criticism of the New Testament. Social-scientific criticism is the term in scholarship that refers to the use of social realities (e.g. institutions, class, factors of community organization) in the critical study of literary sources available (this is an advance over "merely" literary and traditional historical questions).

Comments

Coiriel Coiriel
This collection of essays examines the social-scientific criticism of Christians in the early Roman provincial Empire. Judge looks at the historical social narrative of Greek and Hebrew Jewish speaking Christians. Social patterns and identity, rank and status, are thoughtfully examined in terms of cultural conformity.
Manarius Manarius
A profound "where-have-you-been-all-my-life?" for understanding early Christianity in its "natural setting." A must-have for all: students, pastor-teachers, the u'grad, seminary and doctoral student, including the biblical scholar!
Sennnel Sennnel
This is a terrific book! It is filled with those unique insights that E. A. Judge so capably brings to the sociology of the earliest Christian communities.
Light out of Fildon Light out of Fildon
Rhetoric is one aspect of ancient life that frequently slides past the modern reader. Conventions of speech and argument which were once glaringly apparent to any ancient reader are utterly unknown to the average modern today. Yet in the past, knowing how frame an argument, could be as important as the truth you were expounding.

"The rhythm of the words ...is more than any other lost to modern ears" (p 63) yet it could rouse an ancient audience to applause.

Cultural norms are usually lost to the modern reader. It was considered proper, and even good, for a man to praise himself. "As Paul himself complains, he was despised for not indulging in it" (p 67) even though Christianity regarded humility as the more moral and acceptable than bragging. Judge argues that "no explanation can get to the heart of Paul's ...radical self-humiliation" (p 97) without an understanding of how Christianity turned many of the values of Roman society on their heads.

Some scholars have argued that Paul came from a lower class, but Judge denies this. "Those dreadful catalogues of personal disaster...are not the mark of a man who took,...humiliation as part of his ordinary lot in society. There was no point in a lowly man's complaining of what he had to put up with. But for a man of St. Paul's rank, the formal recital of affronts is itself a deliberate embarrassment to those he is addressing as well as a mark of his of sensitivity to questions of status" (p 100).

Again and again, Paul ignores what ancient Greek and Romans would have thought proper, including ordinary self interest and presenting himself as a member of an elite status. He views the status of a person, not as to whether or not they were well educated, wealthy, or friends of those who were, but as to whether or not the person has turned to Christ.
Christianity would overturn more than one social custom, as "The fact that New Testament writers address themselves directly to persons held in slavery" (p 86) went against ancient values.