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eBook Metaphors and Similes for Yahweh in Hosea, 14:2-9 (1-8): A Study of Hoseanic Pictorial Language (Friedensauer Schriftenreihe) ePub

eBook Metaphors and Similes for Yahweh in Hosea, 14:2-9 (1-8): A Study of Hoseanic Pictorial Language (Friedensauer Schriftenreihe) ePub

by Bernhard Oestreich

  • ISBN: 0820436151
  • Category: Bible Study and Reference
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Bernhard Oestreich
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing (December 31, 1998)
  • Pages: 278
  • ePub book: 1438 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1661 kb
  • Other: mobi azw lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 235

Description

They are not to be interpreted as literal description of cultic experiences. All the metaphors for Yahweh in Hos 14 are traditionally connected with kingship

They are not to be interpreted as literal description of cultic experiences. All the metaphors for Yahweh in Hos 14 are traditionally connected with kingship. They are used in such a way that they express an eschatological hope with Yahweh as Israel's king, however, without downgrading Yahweh's radical judgment.

They are not to be interpreted as literal description of cultic experiences.

Oestreich, . Metaphors and Similes for Yahweh in Hosea 14:2-9 (1-8). For that reason the book of Hosea was considered as a prototype of the prophetic literature, and Hosea, as the initiator of a new theological view on the land theme. Reihe A: Theologie, 1), Frankfurt a. M. .

Bernhard Oestreich: Metaphors and Similes for Yahweh in Hosea 14:2-9 (1-8): A Study of Hoseanic Pictorial . All the metaphors for Yahweh in Hos 14 are traditionally connected with kingship

Friedensauer Schriftenreihe: Reihe A, Theologie, 1) Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang, 1998. 278 . Literaturverz. S. 235-278 ISBN 3-631-33666-7. They are used in such a way that they express an eschatological hope with Yahweh as Israel's king, however, without downgrading Yahweh's radical judgement. Chapter 1: Introduction. Introduction to the Problem.

By Bernhard Oestreich. Metaphors and similes for Yahweh in Hosea, 14:2-9 (1-8).

Metaphors and similes for Yahweh in Hosea 14:2-9 (1-8) : a study of Hoseanic pictorial . Professor of New Testament Studies. 118+ million publications.

Thesis (Ph. -Andrews University, Seventh-Day Adventist Theological Seminary, 1997. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 326-377).

Personal Name: Oestreich, Bernhard, 1949-. Publication, Distribution, et. Frankfurt am Main ; New York Series Statement: Friedensauer Schriftenreihe. Reihe A, Theologie, 0947-2320 ; Bd. 1. Dissertation Note

Personal Name: Oestreich, Bernhard, 1949-. Frankfurt am Main ; New York. Physical Description: 278 p. ;, 21 cm. Series Statement: Friedensauer Schriftenreihe. Dissertation Note: Thesis (Ph. Andrews University, 1997. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 235-278).

Chapter 2 determines the limitation and the structure of the passage Hos 2:2-9 (Eng. 1-8)

An interpretation based on mythology or cult practices, that understands the metaphors in some sense as a literal description of Hosea's or the people's experience, is rejected because it is not supported by the texts and because it implies a devaluation of the metaphors. Chapter 2 determines the limitation and the structure of the passage Hos 2:2-9 (Eng. 1-8). In chapters 3 to 6 the metaphors and similes of this passage which refer to Yahweh, . "healing," "loving," "dew," and "tree," are investigated in turn.

Talking about thinking in Tagalog. Cognitive Linguistics.

Frankfurt: Peter Lang. Offstein, Evan . & Neck, Cristopher P. 2003. Talking about thinking in Tagalog. Palmer, Gary . Goddard, Cliff, & Lee, Penny.

Compared with the effort to interpret Hosea 1-3, the final chapter has been rather neglected. Additionally, the variety of explanations of biblical images in Hos 14 indicates a necessity to clarify the methods of their interpretation. The metaphors and similes of Hos 14:2-9 referring to Yahweh, 'healing, loving dew', and 'tree', are investigated. They are interpreted on the background of their language conventions. Thereby the actual usage in Hosea with its twists, alterations, and reversals becomes obvious. The study demonstrates that Hosea's metaphors and similes are deeply rooted in Israelite language traditions. They are not to be interpreted as literal description of cultic experiences. All the metaphors for Yahweh in Hos 14 are traditionally connected with kingship. They are used in such a way that they express an eschatological hope with Yahweh as Israel's king, however, without downgrading Yahweh's radical judgment.