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eBook What Paul Meant ePub

eBook What Paul Meant ePub

by Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist and Historian Garry Wills

  • ISBN: 078616137X
  • Category: Bible Study and Reference
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist and Historian Garry Wills
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks; Unabridged edition (November 2, 2006)
  • ePub book: 1622 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1357 kb
  • Other: docx doc lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 846

Description

Garry Wills (born May 22, 1934) is an American author, journalist, and historian, specializing in American history, politics, and religion, especially the history of the Catholic Church. He won a Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1993.

Garry Wills (born May 22, 1934) is an American author, journalist, and historian, specializing in American history, politics, and religion, especially the history of the Catholic Church. He became a faculty member of the history department at Northwestern University in 1980, where he is currently an Emeritus Professor of History.

GARRY WILLS has written many acclaimed works, on religion and on American history, including Lincoln at Gettysburg, Cincinnatus: George Washington and the Enlightenment, What Jesus Meant, and What Paul Meant

GARRY WILLS has written many acclaimed works, on religion and on American history, including Lincoln at Gettysburg, Cincinnatus: George Washington and the Enlightenment, What Jesus Meant, and What Paul Meant. His works have received many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize. He studied for the priesthood and took his doctorate in the classics. He is now professor of history emeritus at Northwestern University.

What Paul Meant by Garry Wills Paperback £1. 2. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Garry Wills is a historian and the author of the New York Times bestsellers What Jesus Meant, Papal Sin, Why I Am a Catholic, and Why Priests?, among others

What Paul Meant by Garry Wills Paperback £1. Garry Wills is a historian and the author of the New York Times bestsellers What Jesus Meant, Papal Sin, Why I Am a Catholic, and Why Priests?, among others. He lives in Evanston, Illinois. Customers who bought this item also bought.

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GARRY WILLS, a distinguished historian and critic, is the author of numerous books, including the Pulitzer Prize–winning Lincoln at Gettysburg, Saint Augustine, and the best-selling Why I Am a Catholic. He is a history professor emeritus at Northwestern University.

Those are some of the adjectives that the prolific journalist and historian Garry Wills uses to describe himself .

Those are some of the adjectives that the prolific journalist and historian Garry Wills uses to describe himself in Outside Looking In, his pointillistic new memoir. Off the page, all those things may (or may not) be true. In 1993 he won a Pulitzer Prize for Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America.

He won a Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1993. YouTube Encyclopedic.

Garry Wills is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and cultural critic, and a professor of. .He served as special assistant to John F. Kennedy; won two Pulitzer Prizes for The Age of Jackson (1946) and A Thousand Days (1966); and in 1998 received the National Humanities Medal.

Garry Wills is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and cultural critic, and a professor of history at Northwestern University. A recipient of the National Book Award, his many books include Lincoln at Gettysburg, Reagan's America, Witches and Jesuits, and a biography of Saint Augustine. He published the first volume of his autobiography, A Life in the Twentieth Century, in 2000.

The Pulitzer Prize for History, administered by Columbia University, is one . Five people have won the Pulitzer Prize for History twice. Charles Bruce Catton was an American historian and journalist, known best for his books concerning the American Civil War.

The Pulitzer Prize for History, administered by Columbia University, is one of the seven American Pulitzer Prizes that are annually awarded for Letters, Drama, and Music. It has been presented since 1917 for a distinguished book about the history of the United States. Thus it is one of the original. Margaret Leech, 1942 for Reveille in Washington, 1860–1865 and 1960 for In the Days of McKinley.

Throughout history, Christians have debated Paul's influence in the church. Though revered, Paul has also been controversial--apocryphal writings by Peter and James charge Paul with being a tool of Satan. In later centuries, Paul was scorned by such writers as Thomas Jefferson, George Bernard Shaw, and Nietzsche. In this masterly analysis, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills chronicles Paul's tremendous influence on the first explosion of Christian belief, the controversy surrounding Paul through the centuries, and the meaning of his words. He argues eloquently that what Paul meant was not contrary to what Jesus meant--rather, the best way to know Jesus is to discover Paul. Unlike the Gospel writers, who carefully shaped their narratives many decades after Jesus' life, Paul wrote in the heat of the moment, offering the best reflection of those early times.

Comments

Braned Braned
Fresh perspective on timeline issues in reference to gospels. Gave me new appreciation for the turmoils of the era. Refreshing!
Gralmeena Gralmeena
In this book, the follow-up to his' "What Jesus Meant" and his other recent books on Christianity in general, as well as his critiques of the modern Catholic Church, Garry Wills offers a fresh, frank, and honest reading of the New Testament that has enhanced my personal renewal of faith. Erudite but not dense, this book reflects Mr. Wills' sharp grasp of modern biblical scholarship and a remarkable ability to synthesize these sacred writings in the terms of life today.
Wenes Wenes
It is an understatement to say that Paul is controversial.

Paul has often gotten a bad rap. As one of the first New Testament writers, instrumental in transforming a universal message, stifled by a provincial culture, into a worldwide faith.. We are told he traveled more than 10,000 miles establishing and encouraging the spread of Jesus' message.

His letters were occasional writings. They were dashed off to deal with local crises. Today, we read his raised voice without knowing or hearing the other side's shouts. His words are heated. They tumble out in self-defense and urgent guidance. Where Jesus taught and guided using simple parables, Paul relied on complex theology.

Paul may not have written much of what is attributed to him, Wills tells us. Of the 13 letters he is often thought of having written; only seven are now believed to be his. They are 1 Thessalonians, Galatians, Philippians, Philemon, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, and Romans. All were written before 55 CE, long before the first Gospels and Acts of the Apostles were penned.

Although he is not a biblical scholar, as a voracious reader and a gifted writer, Wills uses recent scholarship to separate fact from fiction.

As in "Lincoln at Gettysburg" and "Nixon Agonistes" (my two favorite Wills books) the author looks at a familiar set of facts and draws startling insights. In this book I was fascinated by Wills'- a former Greek professor at Johns Hopkins University - ability to draw insightful and nuanced meaning from his personal translations of familiar New Testament verses.

With characteristic clarity, Wills frees Paul from the misconceptions that distort his significance.
kewdiepie kewdiepie
Garry Wills, Professor of History Emeritus, Northwestern University, and former seminarian, has written several provocative books covering the Catholic Church ("The Papal Sin," "Why I am Catholic), Jesus ("What Jesus Meant"), and now Apostle Paul with "What Paul Meant." "What Paul Meant" is no less provocative and is a great add to Will's legacy.

Paul has been accused of substituting his own "high-flown but also dark theology for the simple teachings of the itinerant preacher from Galilee. Accusers believe he was bound to as he never knew or understood Jesus, a figure he never met. Wills shows us that this misunderstanding derives from a massive misreading of Paul and of a misleading of minds of people down through centuries. He argues that the heart of the problem is that Paul entered the bloodstream of Western civilization mainly through "one artery, the vein carrying the consciousness of sin, of guilt, of the tortured conscience." Thus, religion was able to take over the legacy of Paul as it did that of Jesus - "because they both opposed it."

"What Paul Meant" highlights, through Paul's thirteen epistles, that the worship of God is a matter of interior love, not based on external observances, on temples or churches, on hierarchies or priesthoods. He, as Jesus, saw only two basic moral duties, love of God and love of neighbor. Both were liberators, not imprisoners. Both were aligned theologically.

We are reminded that Paul's writings are the first to reach us from a follower of Jesus. He takes us closer in time to Jesus than does any other person or group or body of writings. So the best way to find out what Jesus meant to his early followers is to see what Paul meant to his fellow believers. He was not an underminer of Jesus. He was not a counterforce but one of the early believers who bore witness to him and wrote about it.

Wills, using excerpts from Paul's writings and from Luke's Acts of the Apostles, examines Paul and the Risen Jesus (Paul is our expert on this); Paul and the Pre-Resurrection Jesus (Paul's accounts of how to address problems are probably closer to what Jesus said than are later records in the Gospels); Paul on the Road (monotheism, high moral principles, full religious equality); Paul and Peter (both were on the same side in the end); Paul and Women (women and men were equal); Paul and the Troubled Gatherings (how he managed damage control); Paul and Jews (he was not the father of Christian anti-Semitism); Paul and Jerusalem (the struggle to keep mindful of the needy); and, Paul and Rome (a "fishy" likelihood).

"What Paul Meant" is an excellent read. Wills is good at making his point - Paul was instep, not out-of-step, with Jesus and what Jesus meant.
Tygrafym Tygrafym
Paul's writings provide a much earlier picture of the life and teachings of Jesus. We can peek in secondhand to the communities that formed him, then assemble the puzzle pieces of how his theology developed.