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eBook On the Genre and Message of Revelation: Star Visions and Sky Journeys ePub

eBook On the Genre and Message of Revelation: Star Visions and Sky Journeys ePub

by Bruce J. Malina

  • ISBN: 1565630408
  • Category: Bible Study and Reference
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Bruce J. Malina
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hendrickson Pub; First Printing edition (October 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 317
  • ePub book: 1404 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1458 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 359

Description

Bruce J. Malina is Professor of Biblical Studies at Creighton University. On the other hand, I feel he makes too much of that fact, and misses the mark regarding how the book of Revelation is organized and the meaning of the book as a whole.

Bruce J. Internationally known for his work in New Testament social science criticism, he is the author of numerous books, including New Testament World: Insights from Cultural Anthropology and Windows on the World of Jesus: Time Travel to Ancient Judea. That is, I think Malina is right about many details but wrong about the big picture.

Bruce Malina thinks so, and he builds an unusually impressive case that will surely stir the interpretive waters surrounding John's Apocalypse.

On the Genre and Message of Revelation: Star Visions and Sky Journeys. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson. The Social World of Jesus and the Gospels. And Jerome H. Neyrey. Minneapolis: Fortress. The New Testament World: Insights from Cultural Anthropology. Essays by the Context Group in Honor of Bruce J. Malina, Leiden: Brill, 2000, p. 1 "Bruce was born on October 9th, 1933 to Mary and Joseph Malina, S. in Brooklyn, NY, the oldest of nine children

On the Genre and Message of Revelation: Star Visions and Sky Journeys, by Bruce J Malina. 15. Heaven On Earth: Helios And The Zodiac Cycle In Ancient Palestinian Synagogues, by Jodi Magness.

On the Genre and Message of Revelation: Star Visions and Sky Journeys, by Bruce J Malina. 16. The Zodiac in Ancient Jewish Art: Representation and Significance, by Rachel Hachili. 17. Jewish Astrology In The Talmud, Pseudepigrapha, The Dead Sea Scrolls, And Early Palestinian Synagogues, by James H. Charlesworth. 18. Reversing Hermon: Enoch, The Watchers & The Forgotten Mission Of Jesus Christ, by Dr. Michael S Heiser

The book's most valuable contribution is the recovery of a neglected background for reading Revelation.

This understanding leads him to read most of Revelation as an unveiling of antediluvian and immediately postdiluvian figures and conflicts that set the readers' present situation in proper perspective. The book's most valuable contribution is the recovery of a neglected background for reading Revelation. The New Jerusalem in the Revelation of John: The City as Symbol of Life with God. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical.

On the genre and message of Revelation. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9781565630406 (978-1-56563-040-6) Hardcover, Hendrickson Pub, 1995. Find signed collectible books: 'On the Genre and Message of Revelation: Star Visions and Sky Journeys'.

On the Genre and Message of Revelation: Star Visions and Sky Journeys

On the Genre and Message of Revelation: Star Visions and Sky Journeys. J Biblic Lit. David Arthur deSilva. Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy. The function of the 1018 Seals of the Primordial Culture will lead us to a better understanding and perception of the 72927 Regions of Time (Watch calendar) of the Primordial Culture (REF: The 9 Primordial Keys ).

As one of the pioneers of applying social criticism to the biblical text, author Bruce Malina has helped revolutionize the way we think about the text and our models for interpretation. Now in a compelling new study—and one that will surely be his most controversial—Malina offers a completely new lens for viewing the book of Revelation. Malina contends that John the Seer's milieu was one of intense interest and fascination with the sky, especially with those "beings" in the sky—constellations, planets, comets, sun, moon, and zodiac—that controlled the destiny of the Earth and its inhabitants. He asserts that John has his own interpretation of the sky that follows not the Greco-Roman astrological myths but the Jewish and Christian story of God's salvation in Messiah. John thus stands as an "astral prophet" who interprets the sky in accordance with what has taken place in Christ. This vibrant reading of Revelation is buttressed by innumerable ancient literary and archeological sources that demonstrate that John's world was indeed one enamored with the sky and its significance for planet Earth.

According to Revelation 4:1, John the Seer looks in the sky and observes an "open door." Then the "first voice" invites John "up" to the heavens to witness what must take place. "In the spirit," John describes what he sees in the sky. Is John really looking at the sky? If he is, then what he sees are the fixtures of heaven: sun, moon, planets, stars, comets, and the like. Is it possible that John, in an effort to reach the people of his day, who were plainly enamored with the sky and its happenings, speaks to his contemporaries about the victory of God's Messiah as attested in the sky? Is John the Seer's language of special numbers, brilliant colors, heavenly thrones, elders, angels, sun, moon, and stars more in keeping with descriptions of the sky than with apocalyptic visions? Bruce Malina thinks so, and he builds an unusually impressive case that will surely stir the interpretive waters surrounding John's Apocalypse. On the Genre and Message of Revelation does what Bruce Malina has done so well for decades: he challenges Western readers to think like ancient Mediterraneans, to slough off biased, scientific presuppositions, and to explore the world of Jesus and his followers with a new map, one that leads to a richer understanding of the New Testament witness of Revelation.

". . . Malina presents a fresh set of Mediterranean cultural scenarios for interpreting Revelation. He cites numerous Mediterranean 'informants' contemporary with John to confirm the insights about how ancient prophets read God's will in the constellations of the heavens. . . . Teachers, preachers, and Bible students will find satisfying solutions to long-standing puzzles."—John J. Pilch, Ph.D., Georgetown University

Comments

PanshyR PanshyR
My graduate studies in theology notwithstanding, this revelation of the book of Revelation's real meaning was a profound education. I've taught this book in years past and now I will only teach Malina's understanding. No more fanciful probes or even scholarly guesses. Once you understand his rock-solid premise about the culture and literary genre, a previously mysterious set of images become as clear, coherent and theologically satisfying as scholars have made the gospels. What was once arcane language becomes just another language. When one first studies French it seems exotic and difficult. But once you learn the language, you just have new information at your command. Once you learn Malina's genre, then, like French, the language of the book becomes just new information -- information that is not mysterious but does enrich the pastoral understanding of the Christian community. I am grateful to Malina - he added a book of scripture to my life.
Obong Obong
I am convinced Malina's identification of many of the symbols in Revelation with astronomical features is spot on. On the other hand, I feel he makes too much of that fact, and misses the mark regarding how the book of Revelation is organized and the meaning of the book as a whole. That is, I think Malina is right about many details but wrong about the big picture. But that Malina is convincing regarding many interesting details is sufficient to make this book a very important one to read on the subject. Basically the cosmos (as the Jews of that time understood it) plays a role in the story, and Malina has succeeded in identifying many of those characters.

But, Melina's ideas need to be compared with other scholarship in the field before one tries to draw any conclusions Other authors have given more convincing arguments regarding the meaning of the book of Revelation as a whole. I'd particularly recommend combining his insights with those of John Marshall in "Parables of War." I am strongly convinced per John Marshall that Revelation is a failed prediction that the Jews would, with supernatural assistance, win the war against Rome. Rome (the great city) rather than Jerusalem (the holy city) is predicted to be destroyed. But in 70 CE the opposite happened proving the prophecy wrong.
JOIN JOIN
This wa sa surprising book--full of extraordinary references and scholarship, but it did not make sense. amazing details and absolutely no use for the material in the hands of 1st century readers--this guy has a vision after eating some shrooms and here it is, but you gotta figure our wha tit means.