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eBook Reading the Bible with Giants: How 2000 Years of Biblical Interpretation Can Shed New Light on Old Texts ePub

eBook Reading the Bible with Giants: How 2000 Years of Biblical Interpretation Can Shed New Light on Old Texts ePub

by David Paul Parris

  • ISBN: 184227273X
  • Category: Bible Study and Reference
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: David Paul Parris
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Paternoster (May 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1568 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1338 kb
  • Other: lrf txt mobi azw
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 985

Description

This book is the result of a long journey.

Book Description: Many readers of the Bible believe that interpreting the Scriptures well simply involves a two-way dialogue between themselves and the text. Implied in this view is the idea that we can simply jump over two thousand years of biblical interpretation. This book is the result of a long journey. I was interested in studying the relationship between Jesus’ Great Commission and the missionary endeavors of the church.

by David Paul Parris (Author). 'David Parris has written a genuinely useful conspectus on the good that follows from reading the Scriptures in the company of faithful readers of the Bible across the centuries. This book is to be highly recommended to any who have the responsibility of teaching Scripture or leading Bible study in both church and secular contexts. Particularly valuable is the practicality and clarity of his opening up fundamental matters of truth and method

In his introduction, author David Parris clearly lays out the purposes and goals for his book Reading the Bible with the Giants. In chapters 4 and 5, Parris demonstrates how tradition shapes our interpretation in that we are in a "living dialogue

In his introduction, author David Parris clearly lays out the purposes and goals for his book Reading the Bible with the Giants. His primary goal is to move the interpreter from a two-way dialogue (reader and text) to a three-way dialogue (reader, text, and the history of biblical interpretation). In chapters 4 and 5, Parris demonstrates how tradition shapes our interpretation in that we are in a "living dialogue. He encourages reading the history of interpretation with openness and evaluation because these interpreters were set forth as leaders in their field even though they may have arrived at interpretations different from today.

book by David Parris. Many readers of the Bible think that interpreting Scripture well simply requires a two-way dialogue between themselves and the text. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Many readers of the Bible believe that interpreting the Scriptures well simply involves a two-way dialogue between .

Many readers of the Bible believe that interpreting the Scriptures well simply involves a two-way dialogue between themselves and the text. However, if we believe that God has been speaking through the Bible to devout believers throughout history it would seem that we should find a way to identify the insights they perceived in the text so that we can learn to read these sacred texts with them.

By David Paul Parris. Pp. xii, 220. Cambridge, Lutterworth, 2015, £2. 0. The Practice of the Body of Christ: Human Agency in Pauline Theology after MacIntyre

By David Paul Parris. The Practice of the Body of Christ: Human Agency in Pauline Theology after MacIntyre. x, 218, Cambridge, James Clarke, 2014, £2. Verbum Domini and the Complementarity of Exegesis and Theology.

The Future of Biblical Interpretation : Responsible Plurality in Biblical Hermeneutics. by: Porter, Stanley E. Published: (2013). Reading the Way to Heaven : A Wesleyan Theological Hermeneutic of Scripture. by: Koskie, Steven Joe. Published: (2014). Participatory Biblical Exegesis : A Theology of Biblical Interpretation. by: Levering, Matthew. Drawing on resources from Reception Theory, the goal of Reading the Bible with the Giants is to enable the contemporary reader to interpret the Bible in dialogue with those who have gone before us. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Read the Bible for the sake of learning, not simply to accomplish your next reading. Say a short prayer to God before you begin, asking the Holy Spirit to give you wisdom and understanding, then be refreshed by the words you read! Day 1 - Genesis 1-3. Day 2 - Genesis 4-7. Day 3 - Genesis 8-11. Day 4 - Job 1-5. Day 5 - Job 6-9.

Reading the Bible with Giants: How 2000 Years of Biblical Interpretation Can Shed New Light on Old Texts.

By John L. Thompson Reading the Bible with Giants: How 2000 Years of Biblical Interpretation Can Shed New Light on Old Texts. By David Paul Parris. Heythrop Journal 50 (1):120-122 (2009). Geoffrey Turner - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (1):109–110. The Bible in the Later Thought of F. W. J. Schelling. Joris Geldhof - 2004 - Philosophy and Theology 16 (1):45-72. The Death of Scripture and the Rise of Biblical Studies. Michael C. Legaspi - 2010 - Oup Usa.

Many readers of the Bible think that interpreting Scripture well simply requires a two-way dialogue between themselves and the text. However, if we believe that God has been speaking through the Bible to devout believers for the past two thousand years it would seem that we should find a way to identify the insights they perceived in the text so that we could learn to read the text with them. Using reception theory, the goal of Reading the Bible with Giants is to bring our tradition of biblical interpretation into our dialogue with the text in order to engage the contemporary reader, the Bible and the history of its interpretation in a three-way dialogue.

Comments

Puchock Puchock
I found this book very helpful. It not only reminded me that our knowledge of knowing God is a journey that began long before we were a twinkle in our parent's eyes. It also reminded me that our knowledge is bounded by the presuppositions of our culture. These presuppositions can be helpful as a scaffolding for our understanding but they are not the total building in which we will live. Knowledge is a step toward wisdom, but only a step. We can learn much from those who went before us. We can add to this learning but we have not completed the summation of all that we can know. So rejoice in your new knowledge but know learning never ends, even after two thousand years. Learning continues throughout history.
Went Tyu Went Tyu
Dr. Parris provides a wonderfully concise and easy to read book on biblical interpretation and more. Building on the metaphor that we are dwarves on the shoulders of giants, he sets out to show how all of our interpretations are based upon the giant theologians of the past. Therefore, it is impossible to read the bible simply between yourself and the text, for whether you realize it or not, you are bringing another's understandings to your studies.

Given this reality, readers should read widely in the Christian classics, which can help to illuminate where their pre-understandings and presuppositions come. Furthermore, Dr. Parris argues that reading texts that seem "less scientific" actually helps us to see the Bible in new and profoundly theological ways instead of as a dry and boring collections of facts.

The book is full of case studies; one of the most prominent is on the interpretation of the whale in Jonah from its Hebrew ancestry up through the reformation and beyond. The author shows how Jewish conceptions of the whale, influenced its Greek translation and subsequently all the early church to see the whale as symbolic of hell. With the reformation, commentators set out to identify the species of the animal and how that changed the reading from theological to scientific that still permeates our understanding of the text today.

Arguing for a fuller understanding, Dr. Parris, urges us to set aside our scientific mindset and read the text again to see the theological wonders that the church fathers found in the text and how we can reclaim those understandings in our world again.

I highly recommend the text as very readable and accessible and encourage us all to find anew our roots and how and why we have received the text as it is and the impacts that has had on our understanding of its meaning today. It was once said, "There's gold in them hills." Let's mine again the foundations of our faith and find the gold.