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eBook Handkonkordanz Zum Grechischen (English and German Edition) ePub

eBook Handkonkordanz Zum Grechischen (English and German Edition) ePub

by A. Schmoller

  • ISBN: 3438060078
  • Category: Bible Study and Reference
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: A. Schmoller
  • Language: English German
  • Publisher: American Bible Society (February 1, 1997)
  • Pages: 534
  • ePub book: 1149 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1292 kb
  • Other: txt azw lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 666

Description

The Handkonkordanz is ideally arranged for finding related usages of a word in a given passage. Other than the introduction, there is no other English (or German) in the book. But do not for that reason be discouraged! The book is easy to use, even with a beginning knowledge of Greek.

The Handkonkordanz is ideally arranged for finding related usages of a word in a given passage. If, however, one is looking, for example, for all the occurrences of a word in, .

Handkonkordanz zum griechischen Neuen Testament. Neu bearbeitet von Beate Köster. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone.

Handkonkordanz Zum Grechischen book. Introduction in German and English. Details (if other): Cancel.

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Texts for beginners include simple sentences with basic vocabulary. More advanced texts feature complex sentences with relative and subordinate clauses and wider use of tenses. Our innovative teaching system clearly indicates the vocabulary level in each reading, making it very easy for any German student to choose appropriate texts for their needs.

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Some of the expressions are relatively common (. hamburger), but most are comparatively rare

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Handkonkordanz zum griechischen Neuen Testament, A. Schmoller. Konkordanz zum hebräischen Alten Testament, G. Lisowsky.

It distributes more than 400,000 Bibles annually, mainly Martin Luther's translation of the Bible and the modern Good News Bible. The Society publishes the internationally accepted base texts for Bible translation: the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, the Novum Testamentum Graece and the Greek New Testament. Handkonkordanz zum griechischen Neuen Testament, A.

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Comments

Boyn Boyn
Schmoller is an excellent "hand" concordance to the Greek New Testament. It is slightly abbreviated (most entries are complete; those that are not are marked with a "*"). Under a given head word, entries are by default listed in canonical order, except that (1) parallel passages are grouped together; (2) passages appearing not to be parallel but to be connected in some sense are grouped together; and (3) on occasion, cross references are included, linking to another entry to be consulted. Each passage is listed only once (except for cross-references). What does this mean to the user? The Handkonkordanz is ideally arranged for finding related usages of a word in a given passage. If, however, one is looking, for example, for all the occurrences of a word in, e.g., Luke, one has to scan the whole entry (and perhaps cross-references) for Lucan references, instead of simply finding all the Luke references in order in the same place (or even predictably ordered in lists under a few sub-headings). The introduction (provided in German and in English) is therefore important and very helpful to the user.

Other than the introduction, there is no other English (or German) in the book. But do not for that reason be discouraged! The book is easy to use, even with a beginning knowledge of Greek.

Each word is accompanied by its Latin (Vulgate) translation, although these have not been updated to correspond to the latest critical Vulgate editions. Where there are several translations for a given Greek word, these are distinguished with superscripts. Schmoller also indicated with the sign "S0" words not used in the Septuagint.

The text is now (2013) in its fifth revised printing (2002) of the eighth improved edition (1989), with later unrevised printings. It has been updated to correspond to Nestle Aland 26-27 (and of course, except for a few passages in the Catholic Epistles, 28), but in some cases also includes variant readings, which are so indicated. The updated lines are, due to limited resetting, in a slightly different typeface, which is interesting but also just slightly annoying.

In summary, this is an excellent and very compact concordance. It goes nicely in the briefcase or on the desktop with your hand-sized Nestle Aland or UBS text. Although I have the larger Moulton-Geden and also a computer concordance, I usually turn to Schmoller first (in fact I just bought a second copy, so as to have one in each study). Buy it. Read the introduction, then dive in. You will not be disappointed.
AGAD AGAD
Handy. Aside from my NA27/28, I carry and use this resource more than any other. Any time I am in a study-, teaching-, or listener-role, this resource is usually open and tantalizing me with trails of pertinent information. For example, reading 1Th 1:2, Paul says, "always making mention . . . constantly mentioning you." A quick look at "constantly" (αδιαλειπτως) in Schmoller shows that this word is only used 4 times in the NT, all by Paul, and always in reference to prayer. Once in Romans (1:9) and 3 times in 1 Thessalonians (1:2; 2:13; and 5:17). This is merely one of several indications that incessant, ongoing prayer is a significant concept for Paul in this letter. And this takes a total of 2-3 minutes to see with your own eyes.

Verbs are listed in the infinitive form, not the typical lexical form. (So, αγαπαν, not αγαπαω.) For important high frequency words, phrases (like Spirit of God, Spirit of man, etc.) the items are grouped, and that means you might need to look through all of the groups to find the your text. For brevity, once a NT source is listed, it will not be repeated. So, in the Gospels, parallels are listed, but not repeated later. Hence, for αγαπαν, in the Matthew section, Mt 19:19 is listed and includes at the end of the line two parallel lines ||Mk 12:31.33. So when you look down about two inches below (where the Mark section starts), only Mk 10:21 is listed. One could easily think that the word only occurs once in Mark. So you must look through all of the Matthew references to see if there are any Mark parallels. This has the disadvantage of taking a little more time and care, but the advantage of showing a usage that only occurs in Mark.

(1) For anyone accustomed to using a Greek concordance, the main advantage of this particular little volume is convenience: both compact and handy.
(2) To those who use Strong's or Young's, this is far and away a better option. Much faster. You can see all the pertinent information in one single look-up. However, you will need to know some basic Greek, since in this volume, everything is listed in Greek (the word, the pertinent section of the verse, etc.) And definitions of each word are given in Latin.

This particular edition is smaller than than the original (very handy, small print)--the original (corrected) is now available in paperback. But I like this size option--makes it easy to carry. Even though the book is 535 pages, it is only about 3/4 inch thick and is the same cover size as the NA27/28. This has a short (2+ page) introduction in both German and English and is worth reading. Seasoned readers will find this very useful; Beginners can start using this book profitably immediately. However, the Latin definitions and examples all in Greek will slow you down.

When listening to others teaching on this or that NT text, this one little book has often allowed me to explore areas of a text only touched on (or not at all) by the speaker. Most words are listed fully. However, watch out for the asterisk (as with *επανω "above", and other very common prepositions, articles, particles, and the like), lest you think there are actually only two occurrences in the NT. An asterisk means "not all occurrences are listed." This is a very useful resource.
Jorius Jorius
I use a concordance daily, often my computer concordance and sometimes Moulton and Geden but nothing was convenient for travel. I used to print off pages of words I was working on from my computer so I could study when I traveled. This concordance is so thorough, though not exhaustive, that it does the job. When I say it is not exhaustive, it won't list occurences of kai, ou, ma, etc.. But it does give every occurrence of most words. Those which are not complete are marked with an asterix. Not only is it convenient but the organization is helpful. Passages which are similar or identical are grouped together which saves time. I spent two days with a relative in the hospital and while the family member slept I sat quietly and studied. When I teach it is always in my briefcase. Just the other day I was asked a question while teaching in Ephesians. I knew the definition of a word but needed an illustration. Quickly consulting Schmoller I was able to find two other references that gave beautiful illustrations of the word's emphasis. Had I not had Schmoller I would have had to defer the question until the next study so that I could look it up in my office. A good concordance is more valuable than a good theology text. I might also recommend the German Bible Society's Lisowsky's Hebrew concordance. It is also very compact (obviously larger than Schmoller) and convenient. I occassionally substitute teach at school and I always pack along my study material in the event I have some extra time to read. These two volumes are greatly appreciated. Any serious pastor or student of the Word should not only buy but regularly use these two texts.