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eBook Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths? (Biblical Studies) ePub

eBook Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths? (Biblical Studies) ePub

by Maurice Casey

  • ISBN: 0567447626
  • Category: Bible Study and Reference
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Maurice Casey
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: T&T Clark (March 13, 2014)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1636 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1667 kb
  • Other: doc txt lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 955

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Did Jesus exist? In recent years there has been a massive upsurge in public discussion of the view that Jesus did not exist. This view first found a voice in the 19th century. Please don't misunderstand me-Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths has something to offer those of us who want to know if Jesus really existed and if the mythicists arguments are valid. For example, Casey argues that if Jesus was historical, then the gospels which were written in Greek should reflect Jesus' use of Aramaic.

Maurice Casey is one such historicist. For further reading I'd recommend The End of Biblical Studies by Hector Avalos and Jesus Didn't Exist by Raphel Lataster with Richard Carrier. In Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths, Casey characterizes mythicists as unlearned, unscholarly, and ignorant. So if you love to hate mythicists, then this book might be for you. On the other hand, if you're looking for good evidence that Jesus existed, then you might wish to look elsewhere. These works can let you know why such poor books like Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths are being written. 2 people found this helpful.

Maurice Casey - Jesus: Evidence and Argument Or Mythicist Myths? 2014 - Page 37 . .many more details of my ordinary life here than I did in the original draft of this book. I was born in 1942, in the middle of an air raid in Sunderland. My father was the Anglican vicar of Wheatley Hill, a mining village some seven miles outside. Brian Bethune "Jesus historians get an earful from Maurice Casey" Maclean's, December 23, 2010. "Durham University Gazette, XXIII (ns) including supplement". Retrieved 13 March 2018.

Moreover, it has not been produced by anyone or anything with any reasonable relationship to critical scholarship.

Maurice Casey, one of the most important Historical Jesus scholars of his generation takes the 'mythicists' to task in this landmark publication. Casey argues neither from a religious respective, nor from that of a committed atheist. Rather he seeks to provide a clear view of what can be said about Jesus, and of what can't.

Paperback, -Biblical Studies: Jesus: Evidence and Argument or.Maurice Sendak Paperback Children's and Young Adults Fiction Books in Spanish. Jesus Christ Paperback Books.

Paperback, -Biblical Studies: Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths? (Paperback /. £. 3. Free postage by Maurice Casey -Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths? . item 6 Casey Maurice-Jesus: Evidence And Argument Or Mythicist Myths? BOOK NEW -Casey Maurice-Jesus: Evidence And Argument Or Mythicist Myths? BOOK NEW. £2. Paperback Maurice Sendak Books. This item doesn't belong on this page.

The historical evidence for Jesus of Nazareth is both long-established .

The historical evidence for Jesus of Nazareth is both long-established and widespread. Within a few decades of his supposed lifetime, he is mentioned by Jewish and Roman historians, as well as by dozens of Christian writings. What do Christian writings tell us? The value of this evidence is that it is both early and detailed. In a recent book, the French philosopher Michel Onfray talks of Jesus as a mere hypothesis, his existence as an idea rather than as a historical figure. About 10 years ago, The Jesus Project was set up in the US; one of its main questions for discussion was that of whether or not Jesus existed.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths? as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Relationship between Investment in R&D and Productivity. February 2001 · Journal of Economic Studies. This article has no abstract. Stafford, Charles (e. Ordinary ethics in China. vii, 300 p. figs, bibliogrs. Books related to Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths? Skip this list.

Did Jesus exist? In recent years there has been a massive upsurge in public discussion of the view that Jesus did not exist. This view first found a voice in the 19th century, when Christian views were no longer taken for granted. Some way into the 20th century, this school of thought was largely thought to have been utterly refuted by the results of respectable critical scholarship (from both secular and religious scholars).

Now, many unprofessional scholars and bloggers ('mythicists'), are gaining an increasingly large following for a view many think to be unsupportable. It is starting to influence the academy, more than that it is starting to influence the views of the public about a crucial historical figure. Maurice Casey, one of the most important Historical Jesus scholars of his generation takes the 'mythicists' to task in this landmark publication. Casey argues neither from a religious respective, nor from that of a committed atheist. Rather he seeks to provide a clear view of what can be said about Jesus, and of what can't.

Comments

Renthadral Renthadral
If you're at all familiar with the mythicist versus historicist debate, then you know that some people are saying that Jesus is merely a myth who never existed while others insist that he did exist. The former are known as “mythicists” while the latter are called “historicists.” You should also understand that historicists tend to become very annoyed with the notion that Jesus never existed and often heap abuse upon the mythicists. Maurice Casey is one such historicist. In Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths, Casey characterizes mythicists as “unlearned,” “unscholarly,” and “ignorant.” So if you love to hate mythicists, then this book might be for you. On the other hand, if you're looking for good evidence that Jesus existed, then you might wish to look elsewhere.

Please don't misunderstand me—Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths has something to offer those of us who want to know if Jesus really existed and if the mythicists arguments are valid. For example, Casey argues that if Jesus was historical, then the gospels which were written in Greek should reflect Jesus' use of Aramaic. Since the gospels sometimes contain peculiarities that hint that the gospel writers were translating Aramaic sources, then the use of such sources take us back to a historical Jesus speaking in Aramaic. You can make what you will of this argument, but at least Casey makes an attempt to substantiate a historical Jesus.

Casey also doesn't disappoint too much as far as his addressing the arguments of some mythicists. He rebuts mostly the arguments of Acharys S (DM Murdock), Earl Doherty, Rene Salm, N.T. Freke with L.P. Gandy, and some internet bloggers. He succeeds to varying degrees in these rebuttals. For example, I think he's right that Acharya S's saying that we have no coins depicting Jesus is a weak argument against his historicity. On the other hand, he accuses mythicists of using “ridiculously late dates” for the gospels, yet he cites only Acharya S for concluding that the gospels were written at the end of the second century. Is Acharya S representative of all mythicists? Casey uses this tact throughout Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths broadbrushing mythicists based on only one or two examples.

Some of Casey's arguments are laughably poor. For instance, to rebut the claim made by some mythicists that the epistles do not mention the earthly life of Jesus in much detail, Casey argues that the epistles did not need to make mention of Jesus' activities on earth because the epistles were written to gentiles. Gentiles just didn't care to know about Jesus' life. They were not interested in all those Jewish activities of Jesus! I'm not so sure; after all, most people who have an interest in Jesus are gentiles, and we generally are quite curious of the Judaism of Jesus (if I must point out the obvious).

Casey does offer his own reason for the phenomenon of mythicism: it is a form of anti-Christian fundamentalism in which former Christian fundamentalists are still fundamentalists only now their fundamentalism is in opposition to Christianity rather than for Christianity. As evidence for this hypothesis he points out that some mythicists like Dan Barker are indeed former Christian fundamentalists. I think there may be some truth to this view, but what is ironic about it is that Casey himself seems to exhibit the influence of Christianity on his own life. For example, he argues for a historical Jesus with passion that is very reminiscent of that of a Christian apologist. Although he describes himself as a former Christian, he strangley upbraids the mythicists for being “anti-Christian.”

Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths just isn't what I normally would consider a good book. In addition to the problems I mention above, much of Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths is simply boring. I was hoping for an eye-opener that would enlighten me to why Jesus is so widely believed to be historical. Instead I got an attack on not only the arguments of mythicists but on their persons as well. If this book is the best that historicists can do to make a case for a real Jesus, then it's no wonder that many doubt his historicity.

For further reading I'd recommend The End of Biblical Studies by Hector Avalos and Jesus Didn't Exist by Raphel Lataster with Richard Carrier. These works can let you know why such poor books like Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths are being written.
Deeroman Deeroman
This is not Maurice Casey's first book on the historicity of Jesus intended for a non-specialist audience. His 2010 Jesus of Nazareth: An Independent Historian's Account of His Life and Teaching was a decent review of the evidence as well as an accessible yet fairly comprehensive case for Casey's own view. Yet such books are not new: while few scholars who write about the historical Jesus bother addressing what they deem long shown, still there are several sources that deliberately start with the question of why historians agree Jesus was a historical person.

The same cannot be said for books that address the most well-known authors who argue that there was no historical Jesus, a viewpoint known as mythicism. Only one other book that I am aware of (Bart Ehrman's Did Jesus Exist?) is so devoted to addressing the errors, flaws, and other problems that are found strewn across the internet and in several books written almost without exception by amateurs. Unlike Ehrman, whose title suggests a focus not found in the book, Casey delivers what he promises: a critique of mythicist arguments. Yet he still manages to provide the reader with both a concise yet valuable introduction to historiography as well as a survey of historical Jesus scholarship. His incorporation of such a treatment into his criticism of mythicism is a masterful contrast.

The book is an easier read than is the best of those by mythicists, yet Casey does not attempt to sensationalize or over-simplify. He writes with clarity, precision, and somehow still manages not to provide the reader with a comprehensive treatment in a comparably short work and without overly-technical prose. Though not without problems, Casey's book fills a much needed gap between the popular mythicist sources and the perspective(s) of specialists.
Zymbl Zymbl
Very scholarly. I was motivated by reading this book to try to actually learning New Testament (Koine) Greek.
Bralore Bralore
Great book, great condition.
Andromathris Andromathris
This book is an excellent summary of all that is wrong with the both the views and scholarship of mythicists. He explains the historical method,evidence for the existence of Jesus,and shows the mythicist arguments for the red herrings they are. I highly recommend the book along with Bart Ehrman's" Did Jesus Exist?"