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eBook Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture ePub

eBook Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture ePub

by Brevard S. Childs

  • ISBN: 0800698339
  • Category: Bible Study and Reference
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Brevard S. Childs
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress Publishers; Reprint edition (January 1, 2011)
  • Pages: 688
  • ePub book: 1347 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1693 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf doc txt
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 459

Description

Brevard Childs, noted scholar of the Hebrew scriptures and biblical theologian, has provided the church with a helpful introdcution to his version of canon criticism applied to the Old Testament

Brevard Childs, noted scholar of the Hebrew scriptures and biblical theologian, has provided the church with a helpful introdcution to his version of canon criticism applied to the Old Testament. Use of "Old Testament" over "Hebrew Bible" or "Tanak" here is deliberate because, as a true Yale-schooler (cf. Lindbeck and Frei), Childs deliberately writes as a Christian churchman and regards the Protestant canon as normative.

XVII ISAIAH I The Historical Approach to the Book of Isaiah 2 The Canonical Shape of the Book of Isaiah 3 Theological and Hermeneutical Implications. XVIII JEREMIAH l Historical Critical Problems 2 The Canonical Shape ofjeremiah 3 Theological and Hermeneutical Implications. S. R. Driver, Introduction to the Literature ofthe Old Testament, Edinburgh 1891, 91913; Louis Ellies Dupin, Dissertatio praelirninaris de auctoribus librorum scripturae in Nova Bibliotheca auctorurn eeclesiasticorum, Paris 1688. J. G. Eichhorn, Einleitung in das Alte Testament, 3 vols. Leipzig 1780-3; 5 vols.

Introduction to the Old Testament As Scripture. 0800605322 (ISBN13: 9780800605322). 2) an Evangelical hermeneutic (if you are Evangelical).

Home Browse Books Book details, Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture. Nor have the countless mediating positions of Delitzsch, Lagrange, Kaufmann, Engnell, and Albright reached to the heart of the prob-

Home Browse Books Book details, Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture. Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture. By Brevard S. Childs. Nor have the countless mediating positions of Delitzsch, Lagrange, Kaufmann, Engnell, and Albright reached to the heart of the prob-. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

CJT-Canadian Journal of Theology Clogg-Frank Bertram Clogg, An Introduction to the New Testament (London

This Introduction attempts to offer a different model for the discipline from that currently represented. It seeks to describe the form and function of the Hebrew Bible in its role as sacred scripture for Israel.

This Introduction attempts to offer a different model for the discipline from that currently represented. It argues the case that the biblical literature has not been correctly understood or interpreted because its role as religious literature has not been correctly assessed. Издание: 1st American ed.

Brevard Springs Childs (September 2, 1923 – June 23, 2007) was an American Old Testament scholar and Professor of Old Testament at Yale University from 1958 until 1999 (and Sterling Professor after 1992), who is considered one of the most influential.

Brevard Springs Childs (September 2, 1923 – June 23, 2007) was an American Old Testament scholar and Professor of Old Testament at Yale University from 1958 until 1999 (and Sterling Professor after 1992), who is considered one of the most influential biblical scholars of the 20th century. Childs is particularly noted for pioneering canonical criticism, a way of interpreting the Bible that focuses on the text of the biblical canon itself as a finished product.

This Introduction attempts to offer a different model for the discipline from that currently represented. Pages: 688 Publisher: Augsburg Fortress Published: 1979 ISBN-10: 0800605322 ISBN-13: 9780800605322. Find at a Library Find at Google Books.

Free 2-day shipping Much of what Childs says in this groundbreaking 1979 book now seems . Brevard Childs was trained as an Old Testament historical critic.

Much of what Childs says in this groundbreaking 1979 book now seems commonplace. This is not to pass judgement on Childs, but to observe how far the working paradigm of biblical studies has changed since then. When this book was written the historical critical method was the dominant paradigm for most biblical scholars. Inspired by currents in literary criticism (New Criticism, Structuralism and Poststructuralism, etc), some biblical scholars were beginning to ask different questions of the biblical text.

This Introduction attempts to offer a different model for the discipline from that currently represented. It seeks to describe the form and function of the Hebrew Bible in its role as sacred scripture for Israel. It argues the case that the biblical literature has not been correctly understood or interpreted because its role as religious literature has not been correctly assessed.

Comments

Azago Azago
A standard work in the study of the formation of the Old Testament, by a recently deceased scholar from Yale. The book, written in the late '70s, reflects nearly 25 years of scholarship and study on the part of Childs. His central argument, more or less, has to do with understanding the "canonical" place or role of each of the books of the Hebrew Bible (OT, more or less). Thus, rather than focusing exclusively on the sources (J, E, D, P, and their offshoots), or on the literary forms found in the OT (myth, saga, poetry, oracle, etc.), or on whether the books reflect historically or archaeologically verifiable events and lives, Childs wants to call our attention to the vital and enduring role the books have had for the worshipping life of the Jewish people. This aspect makes this book well worth reading.

The drawback for many readers will be that Childs is very much writing as a scholar in conversation with other scholars. In a sense, a general readership is not Childs' intended audience, so the "average" reader could be very easily put off by that. That shouldn't necessarily keep you from buying this book, though. My advice for a general audience would be to read the chapters from end to start, since Childs uses a very accessibe structure for his discussion of each book of the OT, summing up the canonical place of each book at the end of each chapter.
Sharpmane Sharpmane
Brevard Childs' Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture is a classic. Childs' view is that most scholars miss the point when they micro-analyze scripture using modern academic approaches used on literature or history, for example. For Childs, Scripture needs to be interpreted from the perspectivet of the religious community: how has it taken shape and functioned in the canon? Going book by book he summarizes the work of previous scholars in an incredibly throrough way before presenting his own thesis. Published in 1979, this was the standard text for decades and remains highly regarded by leading academics as well as the faithful.
Ziena Ziena
Excellent book on Old Testament Theology
Bukelv Bukelv
This is an introductory work but is still invaluable. Childs writes with clarity and cogency, and a has massive knowledge of his field.
Arcanescar Arcanescar
Brevard Childs, noted scholar of the Hebrew scriptures and biblical theologian, has provided the church with a helpful introdcution to his version of canon criticism applied to the Old Testament. Use of "Old Testament" over "Hebrew Bible" or "Tanak" here is deliberate because, as a true Yale-schooler (cf. Lindbeck and Frei), Childs deliberately writes as a Christian churchman and regards the Protestant canon as normative. His method is one of looking for the theological substance of a given Old Testament book as it is embedded in its final canonical form and arrangement. Seeking a divine communication "beyond the desert of criticism" (Ricoeur), he briefly introduces and then brackets out the various historical-critical issues presented by a given book. The title is somewhat misleading as this is not a true "Introduction" on the order of Eissfeldt, R.K. Harrison, or Longman/Dillard, but is properly an introduction to Childs' method of approach. Although OT scholarship has surpassed many of his historical-critical conclusions (hence 4 stars), Childs achieves theological profundity in many places. He also writes in an elegant, preachable prose that theologians, pastors, and students will find refreshing and welcome.
Wetiwavas Wetiwavas
This is one of the most influential general introductions to the Bible ever written. After more than 20 years, it is still much discussed and much misunderstood. Childs is a devout Christian who advocates a new approach to Biblical criticism, called Canonical Criticism, whereby you should consider books of the Bible and indeed the whole Bible in the form in which they are accepted as canonical (namely inspired and authoritative works) by Jews and Christians. You may agree or disagree with his approach, but read this book carefully and think hard; whatever your conclusions, you will gain a lot of insight. Of course, as its title indicates, it covers only the Old Testament.
Siralune Siralune
I am currently reading this book for a class, and I am enjoying it. Most of the students don't like it because it is hard to understand, but I like that it is challenging. He does a good job of laying out the information and allowing you to draw conclusions (though he makes some himself). Good book. Worth the price.
Each chapter has a bibliography and Child's analysis of issues in that book. I will use it in all my work.