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eBook The desolate city: Revolution in the Catholic Church ePub

eBook The desolate city: Revolution in the Catholic Church ePub

by Anne Roche Muggeridge

  • ISBN: 0060660384
  • Category: Catholicism
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Anne Roche Muggeridge
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper & Row; 1st U.S. ed edition (1986)
  • Pages: 219
  • ePub book: 1602 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1735 kb
  • Other: lrf mbr txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 237

Description

Anne Roche Muggeridge has also written The Gates of Hell: The Struggle for the Catholic Church

Anne Roche Muggeridge has also written The Gates of Hell: The Struggle for the Catholic Church. She wrote in the first chapter of this 1990 book, "This book is an attempt explain the complete and extraordinarily collapse of the Catholic world in which I grew up, a society still in 1960 at the peak of confidence and unity. it is both possible and illuminating to compare events within with similar events in secular society. I argue that a revolution is taking place within the Roman Catholic Church, a classic revolution in the pattern of those.

The Desolate City book. in whose name the revolution was made out of the church.

Muggeridge, Anne Roche. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Anne Roche Muggeridge. The Desolate City: The Catholic Church in Ruins. The Counter Revolution Continues. com User, October 22, 2007

Anne Roche Muggeridge. Anne Roche Muggeridge. com User, October 22, 2007. This was an eye opening book on the forces within the Catholic Church who tried to turn the Church into a form of liberal Protestantism.

She describes the Dignity Mass in Seattle’s cathedral as the last straw for the remaining believers in his flock. Residents of the archdiocese of Washington DC may wish to join me in a dark and hollow laugh.

Find nearly any book by Anne Roche Muggeridge. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Desolate City: Revolution in the Catholic Church: ISBN 9780060660468 (978-0-06-066046-8) Softcover, Harper & Row, 1990. by Anne Roche Muggeridge. ISBN 9780771076862 (978-0-7710-7686-2) Hardcover, M&S Pu. 1986.

The desolate city : (Muggeridge, Anne Roche. Bibliographical information (record 1583). The desolate city : Subtitle: revolution in the Catholic Church /. Author

The desolate city : (Muggeridge, Anne Roche. Author: Muggeridge, Anne Roche. Publisher: Harper & Row

The Church Implodes In the United States during the late 1960s and early 1970s .

The Church Implodes In the United States during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Catholic Church nearly self-destructed in terms of maintaining itself as a self-perpetuating organization. Here we are considering the Church as an institution in a particular country, not as the mystical Body of Christ. Large numbers of priests left the priesthood, candidates for the priesthood dwindled dramatically, and seminaries began to close down. Anyone younger can only glean how dramatically and quickly the Church fell apart from numerous books written on the subject (such as "The Desolate City" by Anne Roche Muggeridge, first published in 1986).

The Desolate City: Revolution in the Catholic Church by Anne Roche Muggeridge. The Peace Tradition in the Catholic Church: An Annotated Bibliography by Ronald G. Musto. The Desolate City: Revolution in the Catholic Church by Anne Roche Muggeridge (pp. 120-121). Musto (pp. 121-122).

Dust jacket chipped and worn. Shipped from the U.K. All orders received before 3pm sent that weekday.

Comments

Tygrafym Tygrafym
Being a former fallen away Catholic, I endeavor to get as many historical perspecpitives on Vatican II and the cultural forces that led me and my family away from Catholicism. Another great book in this category. Recommended.

Other books in this category 'Post Vatican-II Catholic Decline' books:
Better 'Post Vatican-II Catholic Decline' books:

** This one being the best! Decline and Fall
The Decline and Fall of the Catholic Church in America

Turmoil & Truth: The Historical Roots of the Modern Crisis in the Catholic Church

The Faithful Departed: The Collapse of Boston's Catholic Culture
Windbearer Windbearer
Now I understand a little better.
Liarienen Liarienen
Wonderful book by a gifted writer. Great perspective. Sad but hopeful. Hopefully goes back in print. Full of faith and love but minces no words - probably as only a layman would.
Balladolbine Balladolbine
interesting, heart felt informative.
Gugrel Gugrel
As it is well known some irreverent theologians like Hans Küng managed to give the impression that they had captured the spirit of Vatican II. They had not. Pope John Paul II did.
I love Mercedes I love Mercedes
The book arrived and was as described and arrived on time.
Doukasa Doukasa
Anne Roche Muggeridge has also written The Gates of Hell: The Struggle for the Catholic Church. She wrote in the first chapter of this 1990 book, "This book is an attempt explain the complete and extraordinarily collapse of the Catholic world in which I grew up, a society still in 1960 at the peak of confidence and unity. Since the Catholic Church is a human society... it is both possible and illuminating to compare events within with similar events in secular society. I argue that a revolution is taking place within the Roman Catholic Church, a classic revolution in the pattern of those that from time to time convulse and transform secular human societies." (Pg. 9)

She suggests, "There is no hint in [Pope John XXIII's] life or words that ... [he] had anything more in mind by aggiornamento than a modernization and simplification of procedures and disciplines, a kind of cheerful spring-cleaning of all the Church's treasures to make them more attractive to expected guests... He thought the whole thing would be over in a few months, and he seems not to have understood the new meaning the word 'ecumenism' had taken on. His own idea of ecumenism... was that all the separated brethren should return to the Catholic Church forthwith." (Pg. 72)

She observes, "In 1960, the majority of Catholics were BELIEVERS in the full sense in which Pope Paul used the word: they gave to the Church the presumption of truth in sexual morality as in all moral law because of the idea they held of the authority of the Church. And the presumption of truth bound them to obedience. Catholics accepted this, approaching the difficult teaching on marriage with varying degrees of heroism. Being sinners, they probably disobeyed it at least as often as they disobeyed the other natural moral laws. But even when they were totally disobedient, they continued to accept the Church's competence to teach it as true. Disobedient Catholics, knowing they had no firm purpose of amendment, absented themselves from the sacraments until such time as grace or circumstances enabled them to be once again in communion." (Pg. 105)

She states, "No significant change can be made in a rite without endangering the belief the rite expresses... no significant change IS made in a rite unless the men making it have experienced a serious change in belief in what the rite formerly expressed." (Pg. 130) She adds, "I wrote years ago that the new liturgy was devised to ideologues and installed by dupes. Do I still stand by this harsh judgment? Yes, I do. I also wrote that I categorically assert the validity of the new liturgy when it is celebrated according to the mind of the Church. Do I still assert this validity? Yes, I do... the Holy Ghost has not allowed His Church on earth to lose its power to make present perpetually the Sacrifice of the Cross... [But] I know from experience that attendance [at Mass] demands a constant struggle to maintain the Catholic world view against the current liturgical expression of it." (Pg. 135)

She observes, "Catholics keep saying about the revolution, 'You can't turn the clock back.' Of course you can, and must, if it's telling the wrong time." (Pg. 173)

Conservative and traditional Catholics will be keenly interested in this book, although it is nearly 25 years old.
Many books have been written criticizing the Catholic Church since the Second Vatican Council, but this one, besides being very well written, expresses a sense of sadness and loss about what was left behind in the Church's rush to modernize that few other writers have ever achieved. While she summarizes the struggles between liberals and conservatives in the US and Canadian Church very well the best parts, in my opinion, are when she writes about her personal experiences as a lonely faithful fighting against a relentless liberal bureaucracy bent on imposing its will despite what Vatican II actually wrote, what the pope has to say on the subject, or what individual lay people think. I have read it over and over - it's that good - and recommend this book to anybody interested in the subject. It was written in 1986 and updated a few years later, so by now it is a little obsolete.