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eBook Parallels and Convergences: Mormon Thought and Engineering Vision ePub

eBook Parallels and Convergences: Mormon Thought and Engineering Vision ePub

by Richard L. Bushman,Terryl L. Givens,A. Scott Howe

  • ISBN: 1589581873
  • Category: Christian Denominations and Sects
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Richard L. Bushman,Terryl L. Givens,A. Scott Howe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Greg Kofford Books, Inc. (February 28, 2012)
  • Pages: 226
  • ePub book: 1982 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1862 kb
  • Other: azw docx mobi lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 790

Description

Richard Bushman poses a vision-expanding proposal: The end point of engineering . Describe the author's style.

Richard Bushman poses a vision-expanding proposal: The end point of engineering knowledge may be divine knowledge. Mormon theology permits us to think of God and humans as collaborators in bringing to pass the immortality and eternal life of man. Engineers may be preparing the way for humans to act more like gods in managing the world. Books related to Parallels and Convergences: Mormon Thought and Engineering Vision.

Parallels and Convergence. has been added to your Cart. This is a book of marvelous speculations that open up the vision of how beautifully and practically Mormonism can (and probably even should) be wed with our increase in scientific knowledge. You will find essays that excitedly explain how quantum physics, nanotechnology, transhumanism, space exploration, and even virtual programmed worlds open to our eyes potential models of the eternities, and even the very nature of resurrection, the millennium, and & creation'.

Parallels and Convergences book.

Author: Richard L. Bushman A. Scott Howe. Title: Parallels and Convergences: Mormon Thought and Engineering Vision.

No small and cramped eternities: Parley Pratt and the foundations of Mormon cosmology 1. Models of spirit matter, Adam N. Davis 2. A. . A standard physics model of spirit, A. Scott Howe 3. A technical interpretation of Mormon physics and physiology, Lincoln Cannon and A. Scott Howe 4. Materialism, free will, and Mormonism, Adam N. Davis 5. God, the perfect engineer, Allen W. Leigh. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Author A. Scott Howe Author Richard L. Bushman. Draper, Utah: Greg Kofford Books, 2012. The introduction by Terryl L. Givens is both informative and masterfully written and outlines the contrasts between traditional Christianity and the revelations in our time. Parallels and Convergences: Mormon Thought and Engineering Vision. While traditional theology focuses on the time between the Fall and the Redemption, Mormon theology stretches beyond the Creation and extends after the Resurrection of Christ.

Howe, A. Scott, Bushman, Richard L. ISBN-13.

The Lord is already on it; and, as the essays in this book provocatively propose, He's following good engineering principles. Joseph Fielding Smith said, regarding inventions in these latter days, The inspiration of the Lord has gone out and takes hold of the minds of men, though they know it not, and they are directed by the Lord. Howe, A. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 0 x . 8 Inches.

Scott Howe and Richard L. Salt Lake City, Utah: Greg Kofford Books, 2012. Softbound, 6 9″, 210 pages

Scott Howe and Richard L. Softbound, 6 9″, 210 pages. The earth will eventually be renewed and receive its paradisiacal glory. But how will our current world ever become the heaven of our dreams? The Lord is already on it; and, as the essays in this book provocatively propose, He’s following good engineering principles. From the foreword by Richard L. Bushman

3. 4. Davis

3. Davis. 5. 6. Complementary aspects of Mormonism and transhumanism, Brent Allsop, Christopher Bradford, Lincoln Cannon, Andrew West, A. Joseph West, and Carl A. Youngblood. Quantified morality, A. 8. Theological implications of the New God Argument, Lincoln Cannon and A. Joseph West.

Richard Bushman poses a vision-expanding proposal: ¿The end point of engineering knowledge may be divine .

Richard Bushman poses a vision-expanding proposal: ¿The end point of engineering knowledge may be divine knowledge. Section 2: Parallels in Mormon Thought: Philosophy and Engineering 5. Leigh 6. Joseph West, Carl A. Youngblood 7. Scott Howe 8. Theological Implications of the New God Argument, Lincoln Cannon, A.

The earth will eventually be renewed and receive its paradisiacal glory. But how will our current world ever become the heaven of our dreams? The Lord is already on it; and, as the essays in this book provocatively proposes, He's following good engineering principles. Joseph Fielding Smith said, regarding inventions in these latter days, "The inspiration of the Lord has gone out and takes hold of the minds of men, though they know it not, and they are directed by the Lord. In this manner he brings them into his service." If there is "no such thing as immaterial matter," and "all spirit is matter," then what are the implications for such standard theological principles as creation, human progression, free will, transfiguration, resurrection, and immortality? In eleven stimulating essays, Mormon engineers probe gospel possibilities and future vistas dealing with human nature, divine progression, and the earth's future. Richard Bushman poses a vision-expanding proposal: "The end point of engineering knowledge may be divine knowledge. Mormon theology permits us to think of God and humans as collaborators in bringing to pass the immortality and eternal life of man. Engineers may be preparing the way for humans to act more like gods in managing the world."

Comments

Urllet Urllet
Interesting set of theories - presented as such, not presented as conclusions. Pro and con on potential physical models of what is normally termed spiritual are explored.

If nothing else, this is a good overview of a what keeps religion generally at odds with the secular word - knee-jerk clinging to its dated terms and models for observable realities of human experience known as "spiritual" or "religious." Re-evaluating the religious or spiritual experience in new terminology does not imply abandoning those observed realities as if they never happened. Considering objectively how we might be talking about the same phenomena as the psychological or other scientist is a step in the right direction.

This book is written in LDS community language with LDS scriptures taken as givens for the most part, which can throw unfamiliar readers off. Still, it' may be useful food for the thoughts of a broader world resolving religious word symbols to the evolving view of science without the all-too-often harsh animosity that accompanies such disagreements.
Hono Hono
"Come let us reason together" with the wisdom of these brilliant scholars. Clear, concise, and verifiable information, -intellectually, philosophically and spiritually. Many thanks to each contributor.
Vonalij Vonalij
For any LDS member interested in reconciling science and theology this is a great book. Lots of really thought provoking ideas.
Ferne Ferne
Gets my brain working again. And it gets my engineering son to come and read it with me and so i get to spend some time with him. And I like the book.
Kardana Kardana
This is a book of marvelous speculations that open up the vision of how beautifully and practically Mormonism can (and probably even should) be wed with our increase in scientific knowledge.

You will find essays that excitedly explain how quantum physics, nanotechnology, transhumanism, space exploration, and even virtual programmed worlds open to our eyes potential models of the eternities, and even the very nature of resurrection, the millennium, and `spiritual creation'. The essays come from a wide degree of differing personal interpretations of the Eternal Story of Mormonism (some are more inspired by Brigham Young, some B.H Roberts some even Tad Callister and Cleon Skousen), but in the end, prior to my initial assumptions, it doesn't diminish their vision, but rather serves to effectively illustrate how expansive and powerful ideas inspired by the Wide World of Mormonism can be.

While I didn't always agree with the ultimate conclusions of the essayists, all of them made me consider some aspects I hadn't before. In one early essay, due to the essayist's stated belief in one particular theological model, I initially read through it not expecting to learn, or to be enlightened in any way by it, having made up my mind that the assumptions the essay were based on would not to speak to me. But I was surprised when an idea and interpretational paradigm was presented that indeed had not occurred to me before. In spite of not expecting or particularly desiring to learn from this essay, I was taught, and inspired. That is the sign of a remarkable teacher.

A key message of the entire collection is that our faith and vision doesn't need to be held back by ancient shepherds' or pioneers' technology and understanding of the workings of the world. We can `map' our technological understanding and development onto their expansive vision - and in many ways, that may indeed be the only way to bring their visions into reality and fulfillment. It is a call to not just hope that some day we may live again, or that we will live in a magically made paradise earth - but rather to very literally, through our acquired knowledge and technology, and guided by inspired vision, to work and apply engineering skills to "bring to pass the immortality and Eternal Life of man".

This book was a blast. I highly recommend it.