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eBook A Better Freedom: Finding Life as Slaves of Christ ePub

eBook A Better Freedom: Finding Life as Slaves of Christ ePub

by Michael Card

  • ISBN: 0830837140
  • Category: Christian Living
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Michael Card
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: IVP Books; Original edition (October 2, 2009)
  • Pages: 168
  • ePub book: 1616 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1442 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf lit docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 982

Description

Michael Card's new book 'A Better Freedom' is truly Biblical orthodoxy, and is empirically verifiable in our lives. He also illustrates through Jesus' life and specific actions that our Lord himself considered his life as a slave's life.

Michael Card's new book 'A Better Freedom' is truly Biblical orthodoxy, and is empirically verifiable in our lives. There is little that we could question in this volume, but it stirs the pot and gives us a breadth of perspective that either provokes old defenses to action or lays our contentions to rest. He, the Master, came as a slave and died a slave's death, served us so that we who are in bondage might be freed to become his slaves. The Master becomes the slave to be the Master.

A Better Freedom book. Michael Card boldly and imaginatively tackles the concept of what it means to be a "slave of Christ" in this book. He is bold in that he is engaging a subject that few are willing to; the topic of slavery has no small stigma, particularly in America.

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more. Try another ZIP code. Card explores the biblical imagery of slavery as a metaphor for Christian discipleship, revealing Christ as the true Lord and Master who sets believers free from the bondage of sin. When Michael Card first started attending an African American church, he was struck by how the congregation worshiped Jesus as "Master. He soon learned that during slavery, calling Jesus "Master" was a subtle way of saying that their earthly masters were not their true Master.

Michael's book deals with that, but at the same time points us to a biblical reality: if we saw ourselves as slaves to Christ our . It, the gospel, is a better freedom. Michael's impression on my life came early and has lasted long. I commend his words, faith, joy and wisdom.

Michael's book deals with that, but at the same time points us to a biblical reality: if we saw ourselves as slaves to Christ our Master, how much more we could do as members of his body! What a wonderful body of Christ we would be if each of us saw Christ as our Master. Michael Card is both a wonderful artist and a serious scholar. Such a marriage of two souls with one pen in his delicate but honest hand is glorious.

When Michael Card first started attending an African American church, he was struck by how the congregation worshiped . A Better Freedom explores the biblical imagery of slavery as a metaphor for Christian discipleship.

When Michael Card first started attending an African American church, he was struck by how the congregation worshiped Jesus as Master. Michael Card shows how the early church saw Greco-Roman slavery as a window into understanding Jesus both as the Savior who took on the form of a slave, but also the true Lord and Master who sets us free from our own slavery to sin. Come, let yourself be captured by the Master. And discover how you can be truly set free. People Who Liked A Better Freedom: Finding Life As Slaves of Christ Also Liked These Free Titles

Listen to unlimited audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. What did Paul, Peter, Jude and James mean when they acknowledged themselves as Christ's slaves? What would it mean for you and me to take upon ourselves the title 'slave of Christ'?" A Better Freedom explores the biblical imagery of slavery as a metaphor for Christian discipleship.

Summary: Freedom in Christ is found through calling him Master. A Better Freedom is a book I wish I had read before preaching that sermon

Summary: Freedom in Christ is found through calling him Master. Years ago when I attended a small church in the years after I finished seminary, I used to occasionally preach. A Better Freedom is a book I wish I had read before preaching that sermon. Michael Card works through the historical realities around slavery in the Roman world, the biblical context of Philemon and a few other passages around slavery, and race based slavery in the United States and his experience of the Black church (he attends a historically Black church.

When Michael Card first started attending an African American church, he was struck by how the congregation worshiped Jesus as "Master.

finding life as slaves of Christ. Published 2009 by IVP Books in Downers Grove, Ill Part I: Beginning a journey. One word, three worlds. Part II: Becoming slaves of Christ. Published 2009 by IVP Books in Downers Grove, Ill. Spirituality, Christian life. Part I: Beginning a journey. I, Paul, a slave of Christ. Eye-slaves and people-pleasers.

When Michael Card first started attending an African American church, he was struck by how the congregation worshiped Jesus as "Master." He soon learned that during slavery, calling Jesus "Master" was a subtle way of saying that their earthly masters were not their true Master. This insight led Card on a journey of discovery, as he wondered, "What did it mean for African American slaves to acknowledge Jesus as Master? What did Paul, Peter, Jude and James mean when they acknowledged themselves as Christ's slaves? What would it mean for you and me to take upon ourselves the title 'slave of Christ'?" A Better Freedom explores the biblical imagery of slavery as a metaphor for Christian discipleship. Michael Card shows how the early church saw Greco-Roman slavery as a window into understanding Jesus both as the Savior who took on the form of a slave, but also the true Lord and Master who sets us free from our own slavery to sin. Come, let yourself be captured by the Master. And discover how you can be truly set free.

Comments

Frdi Frdi
Once every few years a book comes along that questions everything we know about ourselves, God, reality, work and life. When we read these books we are confronted with the heady elixir of unchartered territory and the sweet familiarity that this rings true.

Michael Card's new book 'A Better Freedom' is truly Biblical orthodoxy, and is empirically verifiable in our lives. There is little that we could question in this volume, but it stirs the pot and gives us a breadth of perspective that either provokes old defenses to action or lays our contentions to rest.

For me this has been the latest in a series of epiphanies that have confronted old dragons and slayed them with the Truth. The marvelous aspect of this has been that the words of this book appeal not only to my desire for Biblical, logical, linguistic and historical accuracy, but it blunts the non-arguments that the 'St Paul versus Jesus' school of thought has been putting forward.

In contemporary American experience, prejudice is a dark, sinister motif to be avoided at all costs. When we hear about Michelle Obama's ancestry which includes a great great grandmother who was a former slave girl (even in her childhood) and gave birth to a mixed race boy, we cringe- rightly so- but we heave a sigh of relief and self-congratulation that it is the progeny of this former slave that now graces the White House as First Lady. Yes- that is indeed beautiful and we need to feel the pride of the moment. But the Bible's references to slavery often ring against our ears and hearts with annoying vagueness. Paul in his writings has pieces of advice for both slaves and masters, but we do not see a William Wilberforce in Paul rousing slaves to action against their masters, Christian or not- and we feel the irony. Didn't Christ come to set us free from the yoke of all bondage?

Michael Card's look at slavery is instantly sensitive and affirming of Jesus' call for us to be slaves of righteousness or slaves of Christ. His insistence that those of us who are in situations of slavery are indeed in a dark place but those who are not owned by Christ are in worse slavery is a transforming truth. This theme resonates through his illustrations of Christ's parables, over 60 percent of which have to do with the theme of slavehood, often translated "servant-hood" in English versions. It brings up people who identified themselves as slaves- Paul, Mary ("handmaiden" in the KJV actually makes the word milder than it should be), Stephen, John and others who also exemplified with their lives what it meant to be owned. He also illustrates through Jesus' life and specific actions that our Lord himself considered his life as a slave's life. He, the Master, came as a slave and died a slave's death, served us so that we who are in bondage might be freed to become his slaves. The Master becomes the slave to be the Master. The slaves die to be free to be slaves to the Master.

What struck me most was the parable of the prodigal son which Card talks about. Perhaps this should be called the parable of the Legalistic Son, as it is as much about the 'good son' as it is about the prodigal. Consider the setting. Jesus is talking to a motley group of sinners and lawyers. He tells three parables- the parable of the sheep that was lost and is found, the parable of the woman who searched for and found the lost silver coin, and finally the parable in question- that order. The first two end with a feast, a celebration because the lost has now been found. The final parable ends with a celebration to which the 'good son' is invited, but we are left with the father's invitation and no answer from the son. There is no closure. The explanation is clear enough. Card says, with Jesus nothing is as it seems. While the prodigal speaks to the wretch that was lost and now is found, the good son is the archetype of the Pharisees and lawyers who are invited and need to respond to Jesus' call. The prodigal prepares a lame speech that he will deliver to his dad on returning home, but he never gets a chance to say it all. He says, "'Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son." But he also wanted to say, "make me like one of your hired men." He never gets the chance because the father showers him with kisses, covers him with the best robe, puts a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. He then throws a big party- and as Card points out parables with this extravagant celebration and kindness (and there are several that Jesus told) are clear indications of our Father's attitude towards repentant sinners. The prodigal hoped to be a slave to the father, but he becomes as a prince. The 'good son' says, "All these years I've been slaving for you and never disobeyed your orders. Yet you never gave me even a young goat so I could celebrate with my friends."

Card asks us, Who was the slave between the brothers? Those who would be slaves in humility and brokenness find that true freedom comes from slavery to Christ. Those that think they are free are in reality slaves.

The reason why I give this book four stars instead of five is my preference for taxonomy of concepts, neatly organized into two or three related "parent ideas" breaking down clearly into "child ideas" that solidifies into a coherent, cohesive concept. Card's writing is very personal- and this is a good thing- but it also means that the ideas come in a stream of consciousness manner. I think others may find this a helpful way to understand the ideas. Just my bent of mind...
Angana Angana
I always enjoy reading Michael Card's work because he depends so much on scripture. This work includes his research into the way servants and slaves answered to their masters then and how we, as Christ followers should answer to our Master now. Mr. Card writes in an easy to read style even though he has heavily researched.
Akinozuru Akinozuru
What a wonderful explanation of the concept of slavery and how it applies to all of us. Clearly, Christ does offer a better freedom.
Shem Shem
Such a thoughtful book. Has provided a fresh light that will change the way I read and understand the Scriptures and hopefully the way I understand and experience the freedom of life in Christ.
PC-rider PC-rider
An enlightening read with life changing consequences. Highly recommend it.
Konetav Konetav
Excellent and focused study or what being a slave to Christ really means! Michael Card breaks down the meaning to help Christians focus on being there for others.
Mopimicr Mopimicr
I love reading any work by this writer. I have several of his books. This book is a must have for those who are serious about following Christ in a new and special way.
I would highly recommend this book. Read it in one day. Gave me a whole new appreciation for the images of slavery in Scripture.