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eBook To Give or Not to Give: Rethinking Dependency, Restoring Generosity, and Redefining Sustainability ePub

eBook To Give or Not to Give: Rethinking Dependency, Restoring Generosity, and Redefining Sustainability ePub

by Peter Kuzmic,John Rowell

  • ISBN: 0830857737
  • Category: Christian Living
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Peter Kuzmic,John Rowell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: IVP Books; PRINT-ON-DEMAND edition (February 3, 2007)
  • Pages: 262
  • ePub book: 1506 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1855 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 346

Description

John Rowell, Peter Kuzmič (Foreword). This book answers the questions whether Westerners ought to give or not to give in support of global evangelism and encourages maximum generosity as the path most reflective of God's heart on the matter.

John Rowell, Peter Kuzmič (Foreword). Consequently, Western missionaries, their churches, and their agencies have been increasingly indisposed to giving generously.

This book answers the questions whether Westerners ought quot;to give or not to givequot; in support of global evangelism and encourages maximum generosity as the path most reflective of God's heart on the matter. Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound.

To Give or Not to Give: Rethinking Dependency, Restoring Generosity, and Redefining Sustainability (which is the real title of the book) is one of the best books on global evangelism that I've ever. He has also worked for several large corporations including a Fortune 500 multi-national company.

John Rowell received his undergraduate college education in California and began his business career as a Certified Public . His book is the best that I have seen on the subject of dependency.

He has also worked for several large corporations including a Fortune 500 multi-national company. To Give or Not to Give? deserves to become required reading for church leaders and mission committees, mission policy makers and missionaries, missiologists and ning.

This book answers the questions whether Westerners ought to give or not to give in support of global evangelism and encourages maximum generosity as the path most reflective of God's heart on the matter.

Consequently, Western missionaries, their churches, and their agencies have been increasingly indisposed to giving generously. We must rethink the interplay of dollars dependency and what it means to "do the right thing" with our money as we pursue twenty-first century missions.

Rethinking Dependency, Restoring Generosity, and Redefining Sustainability (Rowell 2006). Rowell argues that North Americans’ reluctance to give generously delays the advance of the gospel and intensifies poverty for others. He writes, If we believe God has called us to build church planting movements in unreached cultures we must get serious about facing our financial as well as our spiritual responsibilities as we lend a helping hand (Rowell 2006, 66).

Rethinking Dependency, Restoring Generosity, and Redefining Sustainability

Rethinking Dependency, Restoring Generosity, and Redefining Sustainability. by John Rowell Foreword by Peter Kuzmic. Missions & Missiology. To Give or Not to Give. I have watched the principles expressed in To Give or Not to Give? Work in practice since we began partnering with John Rowell fifteen years ago. Based on my experience, it is easy to commend his challenges to church and mission leaders everywhere.

Rethinking Dependency, Restoring Generosity, and Redefining Sustainability. As a registered dietitian, diabetes educator, and blogger, Nicole Morrissey has created a wide variety of recipes for all types of people and their diets

Rethinking Dependency, Restoring Generosity, and Redefining Sustainability. As a registered dietitian, diabetes educator, and blogger, Nicole Morrissey has created a wide variety of recipes for all types of people and their diets. Her goal has always been to provide her clients and fans of her blog with light recipes and meal plans that will help them feel energized and healthy.

To Give or Not to Give: Rethinking Dependency, Restoring Generosity, and Redefining Sustainability. This book consists largely of material derived from Jones' tenure as a systematic theology professor at Christian Theological Seminary. This began in outline form in the early 1990s, growing in shape and narrative over the course of ten years as Jones continued to teach the year-long course in systematic theology.

Modern mission theory is guided largely by the three self paradigm that suggests indigenous churches can only be healthy if they are self-governing, self-propagating, and self-supporting. Consequently, Western missionaries, their churches, and their agencies have been increasingly indisposed to giving generously. We must rethink the interplay of dollars dependency and what it means to do the right thing with our money as we pursue twenty-first century missions. This book answers the questions whether Westerners ought to give or not to give in support of global evangelism and encourages maximum generosity as the path most reflective of God's heart on the matter.

Comments

Flathan Flathan
My one star rating has nothing to do with the content of the book. I think the book is very insightful and particularly helpful on the topic of giving in the context of mission. It seems that John Rowell, like Jonathan Bonk in Missions and Money, has spoken prophetically to missionaries from the wealthy West.

I give the book a one star rating because of its terrible Kindle format. IVP: for the price people are paying for this Kindle book ($9.99), the least you could do is get someone to format it properly so that it's user friendly! I would think that a publisher who's been in the business as long as you have would at least have one of your employees spend a few man hours on doing so before releasing it on Kindle!
Avarm Avarm
This book helps to discern when and when not to give on mission trips and things concerned on mission trips. It can be difficult, but this certainly helps with decisions about giving.
in waiting in waiting
This book ponders how we go about "helping" those in other cultures and what partnering could look like.
Faulkree Faulkree
Having listened to John present on this subject at a meeting in late 2007, I appreciated his heart for giving to the poor. However, he admitted that his experience in providing financial assistance was limited to a European setting (hence my choice of three stars). To add further perspective to this very important book review, I recently came across an article responding directly to Rowell's book from Jim Harries - a missionary to Africa who started out thinking like Rowell, but who later changed his perspective. Instead of trying to restate his reasoning, readers can find the article by doing a search on it's title: "Difficulties in Giving" followed by the author's name: "Jim Harries"
Jox Jox
Modern missions have some disturbing features, such as the wide disparity between the rich (in traditionally sending nations) and the poor (in traditionally receiving nations), and the lack of enthusiasm in mission giving by wealthy Christians. John Rowell believes he knows why these things exist and what can be done about them. He says that by stressing the three-self formula and trying to avoid creating dependency, missiologists have provided an excuse to wealthy American Christians that persuades them not to give. In addition, Americans are heavily influenced by the history of the welfare system as it has evolved and are now opposed to handouts.
Rowell believes that generosity in mission giving must not only be restored, but should be on the order of the Marshall Plan that helped rebuild Europe after World War II. This will necessitate the removal of the obstacle of the three-self formula and worries about creating dependency, since the biblical mandate to help the poor must override those outdated concerns. Rowell generally sees the poor as both Christians in developing countries who need assistance in church work and in their everyday lives, and as non-Christians who need better health care, food, education, jobs, and so on. He emphasizes that most unreached people are poor.
Rowell's mission experience is through long-term assistance to some churches in Bosnia. After his arrival during the devastation of the 1990s war in Bosnia, Rowell became the leader of a consortium of American churches that funded Bosnian evangelical churches. He cites the generous giving of these Americans as a model of what he proposes. Some principles that they used in giving included forming covenant relationships with the Bosnians and supplying funds with "no-strings-attached."
In support of his proposals, Rowell relies heavily on the works of Ron Sider and Jonathan Bonk. He also tries to use Henry Venn, John Nevius, and Roland Allen to support his position, but this is not convincing. For example, he says that Venn used the three-self formula only to prevent western domination of indigenous people but was not so worried about creating dependency. In fact, western domination and indigenous dependency are just two sides of the same coin. Modern missionaries have twisted Venn's meaning, Rowell asserts, to include a concern about dependency that precludes generosity from the wealthy. This particular accusation, however, is never really proved.
Although Rowell clearly understands the pitfalls that could accompany his proposals, and cites all the relevant authorities, in the end he decides that overcoming poverty overrides all other concerns. He redefines sustainability to mean that as long as poor or sick people are being helped, funds should continue to pour in from wealthy American Christians. This method of missions would position the United States as the "War Chest for World Missions" (p. 252). While the issues Rowell addresses of global poverty and lack of generosity are worthy topics that need good answers, his final proposals would likely exacerbate the very problems he hopes to solve.
Nightscar Nightscar
This is an excellent book for any missionary who has struggled with the issue of when to give, how much and to whom. The author has a good grasp of previous missiological theory as well as current and is able to give well thought through arguments as to why giving generously is so important. Whether you agree with him or not, he develops well his ideas of indigenous dependancy, sustainability and partnership - covenant relationship. Anyone struggling with the current role of the expatriate white missionary over seas needs to read this book.
Shaktit Shaktit
John Rowell did his homework and created an extremely helpful resource for those of us who are thoughtfully investing our God-given resources in biblically responsible and strategic ways. I wish this book would be widely read throughout the Christian community.
This book was being passed around at a recent conference in Costa Rica. Representatives of North American churches which have partnered with Latin American churches were meeting with (some) of the partners' reps to discuss dependencey and sustanability. All the participants were in the process of re-thinking our relationships on at least some level. I haven't read the book yet, but I expect it to change my giving paradigm, both personally and corporately.