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eBook Pastor: The Theology and Practice of Ordained Ministry ePub

eBook Pastor: The Theology and Practice of Ordained Ministry ePub

by William H. Willimon

  • ISBN: 0687045320
  • Category: Churches and Church Leadership
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: William H. Willimon
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Abingdon Press; 60477th edition (January 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 392
  • ePub book: 1896 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1503 kb
  • Other: doc lit rtf txt
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 102

Description

Ordained ministry, says Willimon, is a gift of God to the church-but that .

Ordained ministry, says Willimon, is a gift of God to the church-but that doesn't mean that it is easy. Always a difficult vocation, changes in society and the church in recent years have made the ordained life all the more complex and challenging. In this book, Willimon explores these and other central questions about the vocation of ordained ministry.

Will Willimon has published many books, including his preaching subscription service on MinistryMatters. com, Pulpit Resource, and Fear of the Other: No Fear in Love, both published by Abingdon Press.

Ships from and sold by indoobestsellers. Will Willimon has published many books, including his preaching subscription service on MinistryMatters.

The only limits you see are the ones you impose on yourself. Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications. 59 MB·42,947 Downloads·New!

His book Pastor: The Theology and Practice of Christian Ministry is used in. .Pastor: The Theology and Practice of Ordained Ministry.

His book Pastor: The Theology and Practice of Christian Ministry is used in dozens of seminaries around the world. In 2018, his book Who Lynched Willie Earle? Preaching to Confront Racism was made book of the year by the Evangelical Press Association. With his stress on the wisdom of the church through the centuries, he is sometimes associated with the post-liberal movement and narrative theology. Nashville: Abingdon, 2002.

Book Overview William H. Willimon's comprehensive and insightful, Pastor: The Theology and Practice of Ordained Ministry, should be read by all entering or currently working in ordained. William H. Willimon's comprehensive and insightful, Pastor: The Theology and Practice of Ordained Ministry, should be read by all entering or currently working in ordained ministry.

In this book, Willimon explores these and other central questions about the vocation of ordained ministry. He begins with a discussion of who pastors are, asking about the theological underpinnings of ordained ministry, and then moves on to what pastors do, looking at the distinctive roles the pastor must fulfill. The book also draws on great teachers of the Christian tradition to demonstrate that, while much about Christian ministry has changed, its core concerns-preaching the word, the care of souls, the sacramental life of s the same

In this book, Willimon explores central questions about the vocation of ordained ministry.

In this book, Willimon explores central questions about the vocation of ordained ministry.

Ordained ministry, says Will Willimon, is a gift of God to the church-but that doesn't mean that it is easy. It begins with a discussion of who pastors are, asking about the theological underpinnings of ordained ministry, and then moves on to what pastors do, looking at the distinctive roles the pastor must fulfill.

More books by William H. Willimon. A Year of Books Subscription Packages. Delivery is free for the UK. Western Europe costs £60 for each 12 month subscription package purchased. All delivery times quoted are the average, and cannot be guaranteed. These should be added to the availability message time, to determine when the goods will arrive. For the Rest of the World the cost is £100 for each package purchased. All delivery costs are charged in advance at time of purchase. For more information please visit the A Year of Books page. Animator's Survival Kit.

It begins with a discussion of who pastors are, asking about the theological underpinnings of ordained ministry, and then moves on to what pastors do, looking at the distinctive roles the pastor must fulfill. Ordained ministry is a vocation to which we are called, not a profession that we choose.

Ordained ministry, says Willimon, is a gift of God to the church--but that doesn't mean that it is easy. Always a difficult vocation, changes in society and the church in recent years have made the ordained life all the more complex and challenging. Is the pastor primarily a preacher, a professional caregiver, an administrator? Given the call of all Christians to be ministers to the world, what is the distinctive ministry of the ordained? When does one's ministry take on the character of prophet, and when does it become that of priest? What are the special ethical obligations and disciplines of the ordained? In this book, Willimon explores these and other central questions about the vocation of ordained ministry.

He begins with a discussion of who pastors are, asking about the theological underpinnings of ordained ministry, and then moves on to what pastors do, looking at the distinctive roles the pastor must fulfill. The book also draws on great teachers of the Christian tradition to demonstrate that, while much about Christian ministry has changed, its core concerns--preaching the word, the care of souls, the sacramental life of congregations--remains the same.

Ordained ministry is a vocation to which we are called, not a profession that we choose. To answer that call is to open oneself to heartache and sometimes hardship; yet, given the one who calls, it is to make oneself available to deep and profound joy as well.

Comments

Bil Bil
I love Willimon, so I had a sense that I would enjoy this book before ever reading it. Willimon’s approach is to describe the theology and practice of ordained Christian ministry. He begins with an analysis of ordination and a description of images of the pastor that are common in contemporary culture, then chapter by chapter, he then describes and reflects on the biblical images of the pastor as priest, preacher, counselor, teacher, evangelist, prophet, and leader.

Throughout his discussion, Willimon presents engaging reflections that will guide and critique both new pastors and seasoned practitioners in ministry. As he quotes sources ranging from Jerome and Augustine to Luther and Spurgeon to various contemporary voices, the reader gets the sense of being in a room filled with those committed to pastoring well.

In his discussion on the role of pastor as interpreter of Scripture, Willimon calls us to “obedient playfulness” with the Word (p. 130). On the task of worship, he points out that “we worship God, not for utilitarian or pragmatic purposes, but because we have been loved” (p. 75). On the task of pastoral counseling, he points out that even Martin Luther complained that marital problems within his church consumed his pastoral attention (p. 177), and then offers the rule of thumb that six sessions of pastoral counseling should be a pastor’s maximum limit, with the goal being spiritual direction, not an attempt to do psychotherapy (p. 179).

Reading Willimon’s book is akin to having a warm and lively discussion with a seasoned mentor regarding the basic tasks of ordained ministry. Indeed, the book will work well either as a tool for peer discussion groups or as a private guide.
Doktilar Doktilar
Overview: This work is likely one of the best books that I have read by a pastor or theologian from the Methodist/Wesleyan tradition in quite some time. Willimon holds a very solid and historical understanding of the person and office of the ordained pastor. Throughout, Willimon attempts to yoke modern pastors to our ancestors and forbearers in the faith by connecting pastoral work to our ancient moorings. He does this especially through his use of the book of Acts and the early ministry of the apostles. Willimon seemingly is little impressed with modern evaluations of ministry by "success" and "growth," in deference to a higher view of ministry as the role of leading, guiding, and shepherding the baptized. Willimon's appreciation for the church as the called-out resistance and counter-cultural movement in a world of darkness was deeply moving at points. In particular, I appreciated the Bishop's use of quotations and historical anecdotes from the Early Fathers, and the Reformers.

Critique: Although Willimon surprised me by quoting from several of the Reformers (Calvin and Luther) as well as even the Westminster Confession of faith, some of his more liberal United Methodism showed forth in his constant references and applications to female pastors. The Bishop went well out of his way to include female ministers and priests in most discussions, but did little to justify his view of gender and ordination. For this reason, Willimon might deserve some "push back" for not defending the controversial position of open ordination. This might be surprising, since he so clearly labors to connect modern pastoral work with that of the ancients and Reformers.

Application: Willimon opened my eyes to a broader understanding of baptism as a delineating mark upon the minister's role of leading the covenant people of God. Although he does not give a full-fledged theology of baptism as a sign and seal of faith (I'm not sure he would even use those terms), he did find occasion to draw baptism into almost every pastoral discussion on the love, labor, and responsibility of the ordained person to tend especially to those who have openly identified with Christ by the covenantal sign of water. I found his incessant references to baptism refreshing, and it reminded me to speak more often of baptism's ongoing significance for the Christian life.

Best Quote: "The church itself forms a culture that is counter to the world's ways of doing things. The church does not simply reach out to and speak to the dominant culture, it seeks to disrupt that culture by rescuing some from it, then to inculcate people into the new culture called the church" (p. 209).

-Matthew Everhard is the Senior Pastor of Faith Evangelical Presbyterian Church in Brooksville, Florida
Yayrel Yayrel
I am nearing the end of my seminary education, and this book was assigned to one of our culmination courses. I didn't know what to expect but quickly came to appreciate what Willimon offered to someone like me, trying to sort out my calling to the pastorate and my vocational future. Throughout this substantial book, he offers encouragement about the joys of being a pastor, shares some challenges about the role, and consistently grounds his ideas in robust theological thought and frequent biblical foundations. He is clearly an intellectual and academic, so the entirety of the book is not merely "practical application." But despite his headiness, the book was very accessible, a much quicker read than I expected for a 330+ page book.

To be sure, with such depth and exhaustive content, I didn't agree with everything that Willimon mentioned. I thought his discussion about potentially contentious issues like homosexuality and the ordination of women was rather dismissive, almost implying that those conversations have been unanimously resolved. With his background entrenched in the Protestant mainline, I found his periodic references to the evangelical church to be somewhat caricaturish and overly simplistic. And that mainline background informs his bias towards more "high church" models of corporate worship, which made some of his instructions and examples about how pastors should lead a congregation in worship to be rather disconnected from my experiences in the evangelical, "low church" world.

But with these points of disconnect notwithstanding, I really appreciated Willimon's book. I feel freshly excited about entering the world of vocational, ordained ministry (without feeling like Willimon has offered anything other than a full-fledged commitment to the "priesthood of all believers"). I am reminded of the challenges that surely lie ahead in pastoral ministry. And I suspect that I'll refer back to this book at various points, as a helpful reference book to both theoretical and practical ("theology and practice") aspects of the pastorate. I'm happy to recommend the book to pastors, novice and experienced, for a solid grounding in what we do what we do and how we might do it most effectively for God's glory.