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eBook The Girl from Montana (Bibliobazaar Reproduction) ePub

eBook The Girl from Montana (Bibliobazaar Reproduction) ePub

by Grace Livingston Hill

  • ISBN: 1426485530
  • Category: Literature and Fiction
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Grace Livingston Hill
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar (February 8, 2007)
  • Pages: 178
  • ePub book: 1942 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1160 kb
  • Other: txt azw mobi lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 316

Description

The girl from montana. by. Grace livingston hill.

The girl from montana. Grosset & dunlappublishers new york. 1922 Books By. Mother's good girl! Don't forget!" andwas gone from her life of burden and disappointment forever, the girl hadprepared the funeral with the assistance of the one brother left. Thegirl's voice had uttered the prayer, "Our Father," just as her mother hadtaught her, because there was no one else to do it; and she was afraid tosend the wild young brother off after a preacher, lest he should notreturn in time. Now you have the chance to read the works of the very first Best-Selling, Christian Young Adult and Romance novelist: Grace Livingston Hill. You’ll love to read this ground-breaking text within the genre of Christian Fiction.

The girl went slowly to her room. All at once it had dawned upon her thatshe had not given her address to the man the night before, nor told him byso much as a word what were her circumstances. Mr. George Benedictbelonged to Geraldine Loring. She sent the note and the little book to his address on Walnut Street; andthen after writing a note to her Grandmother Brady, saying that she wasgoing away for a long trip with Grandmother Bailey, she gave herself intothe hands of the future like a submissive but weary child.

Every Grace Livingston Hill book that I've read has been enjoyable but The Girl from Montana is a special tome. Did you know that GLH had never seen the West when she wrote this book? You cannot tell by reading it!

Every Grace Livingston Hill book that I've read has been enjoyable but The Girl from Montana is a special tome. I like to read Grace Livingston Hill interspersed with other books. With her, like with Barbara Cartland, I know what I'll be getting. There will be no explicit sex and no profanity. THE GIRL FROM MONTANA is not quite as good as others by Hill I've read this year. From the way it is written, I guessed this one was written earlier, and, after checking, it was-in 1908. The whole time I read, I seemed to be standing at a distance observing the story unfold.

The Girl from Montana book. I've been reading Grace Livingston Hill for over 50 years. This book is refreshing and beautifully written, spreading the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ

The Girl from Montana book. This is the story of a lovable girl upon whom fate has. This book is refreshing and beautifully written, spreading the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. Her books are a testament on how you should live you you life whether you are 15 or 65.

Grace Livingston Hill. The Girl from Montana. One fee. Stacks of books.

Grace Livingston Hill (April 16, 1865 – February 23, 1947) was an early 20th-century novelist and wrote both under her real name and the pseudonym Marcia Macdonald. She wrote over 100 novels and numerous short stories. Her characters were most often. Her characters were most often young female Christian women or those who become so within the confines of the story. Grace Livingston Hill was born in Wellsville, New York to Marcia Macdonald Livingston and her husband, Presbyterian minister, Rev. Charles Montgomery Livingston.

Вам также могут понравиться. Grace Livingston Hill Hardcover Books. Fiction & Literature Grace Livingston Hill Books in English. Paperback Grace Livingston Hill Books. Grace Livingston Hill Paperback Books. Grace Livingston Hill Books. Books Grace Livingston Hill. Дополнительная навигация по сайту.

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. This text refers to the Bibliobazaar edition.

Comments

Sironynyr Sironynyr
Every Grace Livingston Hill book that I've read has been enjoyable but The Girl from Montana is a special tome. Did you know that GLH had never seen the West when she wrote this book? You cannot tell by reading it! She carried on extensive correspondence with women who lived there and requested their most detailed descriptions of the people, weather, and landscape. She quite successfully managed to perfectly capture a place she had never been to at that point in her life. I'm sure you'll enjoy this sweet story written in a way that only Grace could write.
Flash_back Flash_back
Rediscovering Grace Livingston Hill through the electronic versions of her novels has been a real pleasure for me. I really appreciate her romantic, honorable, and high-minded stories. Yes, her heroes and heroines are absurdly idealized--pretty close to perfect, in fact--but she still manages to make them real people that I care about. The story of Elizabeth Bailey and her journey from Montana girl to Philadelphia lady is both absorbing and entertaining, and if I rolled my eyes a few times over all the misunderstandings at the end, I still enjoyed the story. I also found it interesting that much of Elizabeth's journey of faith centers around Christian Endeavor. I had never heard of the organization before but read on the GLH website that she and her husband were involved the organization, which makes it all the more interesting that she incorporated it into her stories. Normally, I can't stand an author with an axe to grind--I've read contemporary stories that should have had "Promotional Consideration Paid By..." disclaimers on them--but in this case, it didn't really bother me that she was plugging an organization that she was involved with. Perhaps it's the distance of time, but I thought it fit into the story well and it never felt like the author was pushing the organization at the expense of the story. All in all, it was an entertaining story and, of course, ended just like it should.
Aurizar Aurizar
The Girl From Montana, wasn't educated,though she spoke well. She didn't know to whom her mother prayed when she spoke the words, "Our Father". But she had a hunger, a desire to know the Father. When trouble can, she set out alone, seeking a new life, a place where she would be safe.
This is another beautifully written story of human courage and God's faithfulness.
Auridora Auridora
I like to read Grace Livingston Hill interspersed with other books. With her, like with Barbara Cartland, I know what I'll be getting. There will be no explicit sex and no profanity.

THE GIRL FROM MONTANA is not quite as good as others by Hill I've read this year. From the way it is written, I guessed this one was written earlier, and, after checking, it was--in 1908. The whole time I read, I seemed to be standing at a distance observing the story unfold. I never got close to the main characters, although I did like them. Saying "the girl" or "the man" for the main characters, instead of calling them by name, seemed odd. For a long ways into the novel, the reader doesn't even know their names. It also seemed odd that they never told each other their names, even after spending days together in the wilderness of Montana. George asks Elizabeth all about herself and the life she has lived, but he never asks her name. In addition, there are a few scanning errors in this one, but not many.

When she and George must part, Elizabeth rides all the way to Philadelphia on her brother's horse. All her family has died, and she is trying to get to her relatives in Pennsylvania. After adventures on the way, she arrives at her mother's lower class family. Men keep trying to accost her, and she ends up with her father's mother, who is wealthy. From here, the stage is set for her to meet George again, but she believes him to be engaged, and she wants to make sure she makes the right decisions to not cause problems. In the meanwhile, she has had her questions answered about God, and has become a strong Christian.

Despite the problems mentioned above, this is a sweet, romance. I considered giving it a three, but I did like it. In the end I gave it a four, although this is a weaker four. It's still worth reading.
Jarortr Jarortr
Well sccripted keep-you-on-yor-toes drama about a teenage girl left alone after her entire family is kiiled by a drunken "frined'" of her brother. The evil man makes lacscivious advances toward her, which she rebuffs. Fearing the cad will return, she leaves her hiilttop cabin.eat into the unknown Montana wilderness. Wnadering to no purpose other than to get away from the pursuer, she encounters a lost hunter. He's apolite young man from the east, running awa y from debutane he doesn't want to marry ad the girl is running away from. after several adventurese together, they come upon arairoad station. He getsd telegram telling him to huury home to Philadellphia to his sick mother. The girl sells her saddle, kkeps her horse and buys a ticket for the next train east. In Phhilly she finds noth grandparents, is introduced to high society. Despie her wealth and fabulous clothes, the west is calling. She don her old travel clothes, get her hor horse and heads west. The knioght in shining armour finds she's lefcatches up to hr and ride off towatd Montanas. ps Wether.they wore red bandanas the story does not say.
It's so easy It's so easy
True to form, Grace Livingston Hill writes about young female women with a romance worked in. Hill's message is simple in nature: good versus evil. As Hill believed the Bible was very clear about what was good and evil in life, she reflected that in her books.
Adokelv Adokelv
Not too many Grace Livingston-Hill heroines are gun-slingers, but the heroine in this one is. I agree with other reviewers who have said this book is light on Christianity and believability - certainly today it is impossible to imagine riding on horseback through Chicago and all the way to Pennsylvania, even when you are trying to imagine it happening over a hundred years ago.

Still, I enjoyed it and found it interesting. The three stars are in relation to other Grace L-H books, not meant to measure this book against all literature. Worth a read on a lazy afternoon or over a few evenings with the lamp on next to your bed. :)