cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Heretics
eBook Heretics ePub

eBook Heretics ePub

by G. K. Chesterton

  • ISBN: 1604591633
  • Category: Theology
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: G. K. Chesterton
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wilder Publications (January 2, 2008)
  • Pages: 120
  • ePub book: 1208 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1826 kb
  • Other: doc mbr rtf mbr
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 618

Description

com, to see other books in our G. K. Chesterton series.

Customers who bought this item also bought. com, to see other books in our G.

Focusing on "heretics" - those who pride themselves on their superiority to Christian views - Chesterton appraises prominent figures who fall into that category from the literary and art worlds. Luminaries such as Rudyard G. Chesterton, the "Prince of Paradox," is at his witty best in this collection of twenty essays and articles from the turn of the twentieth century.

In his book Heretics, Chesterton has this to say of Wilde: "The same lesson . .

In his book Heretics, Chesterton has this to say of Wilde: "The same lesson was taught by the very powerful and very desolate philosophy of Oscar Wilde. It is the carpe diem religion; but the carpe diem religion is not the religion of happy people, but of very unhappy people

Although the novel is set in the future, it is, in effect, set in an alternative reality of Chesterton's own period, with no advances in technology or changes in the class system or attitudes.

How is this book unique? Font adjustments & biography included Unabridged (100% Original content) Illustrated About The Napoleon Of Notting Hill by G. Chesterton The Napoleon of Notting Hill is a novel written by G. Chesterton in 1904, set in a nearly unchanged London in 1984. Although the novel is set in the future, it is, in effect, set in an alternative reality of Chesterton's own period, with no advances in technology or changes in the class system or attitudes.

Renowned as a spiritual thinker and sometimes Christian apologist, intellectual ., Chesterton never backed away from difficult or controversial topics

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Renowned as a spiritual thinker and sometimes Christian apologist, intellectual ., Chesterton never backed away from difficult or controversial topics. This extended take on the topic of heresy will engage believers and non-believers alike. A rewarding read for those with an interest in religious philosophy.

So, in this book, Chesterton is attacking all the wrong kinds of thinking in the world.

Chesterton, the Prince of Paradox, is at his witty best in this collection of twenty essays and articles from the turn of the twentieth century. Focusing on heretics - those who pride themselves on their superiority to conservative views - Chesterton appraises prominent figures who fall into that category from the literary and art worlds. Heretics roused the ire of some critics for censuring contemporary philosophies without providing alternatives; the author responded a few years later with a companion volume, Orthodoxy. So, in this book, Chesterton is attacking all the wrong kinds of thinking in the world.

Heretics - G. C. Chesterton. by Gilbert K. To the Students of the Words, Works and Ways of God: Welcome to the SAGE Digital Library. We trust your experience with this and other volumes in the Library fulfills our motto and vision which is our commitment to you

Chesterton considered this book a companion to his other work, Heretics, writing it expressly in response to.Orthodoxy (1908) is a book by G. Chesterton that has become a classic of Christian apologetics.

Chesterton considered this book a companion to his other work, Heretics, writing it expressly in response to . Street's criticism of the earlier work, "that he was not going to bother about his theology until I had really stated mine. In the book's preface Chesterton states the purpose is to "attempt an explanation, not of whether the Christian faith can be believed, but of how he personally has come to believe i. In it, Chesterton presents an original view of Christian religion. Seller Inventory APC9781976213878.

In Heretics, Gilbert K. Chesterton rails against what he sees as wrong with society. He points out how society has gone astray and how life and spiritually could be brought back into focus. It is foolish, generally speaking, for a philosopher to set fire to another philosopher in Smithfield Market because they do not agree in their theory of the universe. That was done very frequently in the last decadence of the Middle Ages, and it failed altogether in its object. But there is one thing that is infinitely more absurd and unpractical than burning a man for his philosophy. This is the habit of saying that his philosophy does not matter, and this is done universally in the twentieth century, in the decadence of the great revolutionary period.- G. K. Chesterton

Comments

Carrot Carrot
Yes, it helps to know the contemporaries of Chesterton. And one must have a love of language and the ability to slow down and turn a phrase in your mind more than once before racing on to the bottom of the page. Given that...

I love Chesterton's gentle skewering of the ideas of friends. But it is not the cynical crassness of today's late night comics. It is the reasoned critique of the unreasonable modern notions of 1905, notions that have flowered and rotted 100 years later. No one can turn a phrase like GKC. Hold a yellow highlighter as you read...you will find a gem on every page.

Example: "The curse that came before history has laid on us all a tendency to be weary of wonders. If we saw the fun for the first time it would be the most fearful and beautiful of meteors....We are inclined to increase our claims. We are inclined to demand six suns, to demand a blue sun, to demand a green sun. Humility is perpetually putting us back in the primal darkness."

And you can see GKC laughing as he writes: "...if an editor can only make people angry enough, they will write half his newspaper for him for nothing."

Take your time. And be ready to come back and read again.
Beabandis Beabandis
There are plenty of wonderful things to think about in this book, and it's full of Chesterton's usual paradoxical style (something he debates with another writer at one point), but it feels a little bitzy, as though it's a bundle of pieces that he's brought together from elsewhere. Nevertheless, it's almost impossible to criticise Chesterton (and who would dare?)
Some of the names have been forgotten almost entirely; a few, like G B Shaw, Kipling, and so on, are still read. Many of the openings of the chapters are the best and most concise things in the chapters, but as always there are gems scattered around, and a bundle of wit.
Thozius Thozius
Heretics is basically a collection of essays written in response to the worldview, socio-political philosophies, and/or religious stances of G.K. Chesterton's contemporaries (like George Bernard Shaw and H.G. Wells). Chesterton enjoyed an ongoing and lively public debate with many of these fellows throughout his writing life. To that end, if you're a Chesterton-fan, you'll enjoy this as much as anything else you've probably read by the undefeated heavyweight champion of linguistic pugilism. If you're not a Chesterton fan (usually because you've yet to hear of the man), this is probably as good a place as any to start. Heretics is the book that sort of necessitated Orthodoxy; a more famous, much-beloved piece.
I would recommend this book for those interested in exploring the arena of worldview debate. It isn't a long book, at only about 150 pages. The essay are broken up into nice little chunks that you can read in a half-hour or so, spend some time mulling, and maybe read through again, if you'd like. I could attempt to describe the content of the essay's, but it would take way too long, and I'd fail to do it anywhere near as well the Big Man himself.
Yahm Yahm
As he himself affirmed, Chesterton was criticized on numerous occasions for maintaining a seemingly irreverent or flippant tone and attitude while writing about subjects that inherently demand the utmost sincerity. To superficially read Heretics might be to understand the apparent validity of such criticism. On the surface it seems as if Chesterton could not have cared much less about the philosophies of the prominent individuals that he attacks as heretical throughout this work, let alone the vague conception of orthodoxy that he utilizes as a basis of comparison. However, these claims against Chesterton only appear valid until the reader ascertains that the author's wit, jocularity, and jovial nature are not to be confused with insincerity. The light touch that Chesterton applies to heavy though is not an indication of indifference, but rather a testament to the acuity of his mind and subtle genius. It might not, it seems, have been possible for Chesterton, or anyone, to have been more serious and sincere. Chesterton cared very much, and that is what sheds light on Heretics' almost impossibly simple truth.

In Heretics, Chesterton outlines the popular philosophies of his day which stood in opposition to not only logic but also that which the author maintained as truth. Amazingly, more than a century later, the same truth is still available and apparent to those who seek it while the same philosophies, although perhaps slightly altered, still stand in direct contradiction to what Chesterton understood to be unmistakable truth. What might be the greatest truth so easily recovered from the pages of Heretics, yet which remains so hidden from the view of the masses, is the incomplete substance, as opposed to the mere falsity, of many philosophies. Chesterton's work, however, was, as he admitted, left unfinished with regard to Heretics and later fulfilled with the publication of Orthodoxy. If Heretics presented a problem, Orthodoxy presented the solution. Both are timeless classics, and both should be read if an understanding of Christianity in relation to apparent philosophical and ideological truths is sought.
Cae Cae
It's Chesteron, for heaven's sake. It is, therefore, excellent. But it's a good thing he didn't live in these times. He couldn't have handled the almost daily heresies that come out of Rome now.