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eBook After Sunday: A Theology of Work ePub

eBook After Sunday: A Theology of Work ePub

by Armand E. Larive

  • ISBN: 0826415911
  • Category: Theology
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: Armand E. Larive
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic; 1 edition (May 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 208
  • ePub book: 1596 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1893 kb
  • Other: docx lit mobi azw
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 714

Description

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Many people devote themselves to their work. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking After Sunday: A Theology of Work as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

After Sunday is a superb, at times brilliant, and engrossing book . In it Armand Larive addresses a neglected and abused theological topic: the significance of work. Drawing on Miroslav Volf, Work in the Spirit: Toward a Theology of Work (New York: Oxford University Press, 1991), Larive deepens and extends Volf's distinctions "of the Son as eschatological, the Father/Mother as protological, and the Spirit as pneumatological" (p. 7). The three chapters, one each devoted to a dimension of the Trinity, lead the reader toward fresh Christological.

The principal impediment to a proper theological understanding of work is the church's voracious appetite to concentrate everything onto Sunday . It then turns to show how this system can underpin an ethics and spirituality of work.

The principal impediment to a proper theological understanding of work is the church's voracious appetite to concentrate everything onto Sunday and its own institutional needs. The kingdom of God gets foreshortened to ecclesiastical boundaries so that the shop floor, the foundry, or the lumberyard and all other places of work are out of bounds.

Armand Larive, After Sunday: A Theology of Work. Fredrica Harris Thompsett. 703. Andrew D. Lester, The Angry Christian: A Theology for Care and Counseling. 706. German Martinez, Signs of Freedom: Theology of the Christian Sacraments. 707. Richard J. Mouw and Mark A. Noll (ed., Wonderful Words of Life: Hymns in American Protestant History and Theology.

The Theology of Work (TOW) Project exists to help people explore what the Bible and the Christian faith can contribute to ordinary work. The Project's primary mission is to produce resources covering every book of the Bible.

Enquiring After God When Working, in: Inquiring After God: Classic and Contemporary . After Sunday: A Theology of Work.

Enquiring After God When Working, in: Inquiring After God: Classic and Contemporary Readings. Wiley-Blackwell, 2000. The Marketplace Annotated Bibliography: A Christian Guide to Books on Work, Business & Vocation. InterVarsity Press, 2002.

Varying Form of Title: Theology of work. Publication, Distribution, et. New York Work and the image of God Getting a focus on vocation Making space for a theology of work The eschatological Christ and homo artifex The protological creator and homo conservans The Spirit, pneumatology, and homo viator Good and godly work Tying themes together. Rubrics: Work Religious aspects Christianity.

Work Cursed and Redeemed. A Theology for Monday Morning. After I joined the world of full-time ministry, this classism was reiterated. One of my mentors in campus ministry said that ministers have a special calling from God that other people don’t. A friend of mine left a well-paying job to join the staff of a Christian ministry. She described her decision something like this: Working a normal job, I had to spend 40 or 50 hours a week doing what my employer wants. I immediately put this idea to work in raising support, telling people, Since you haven’t been called into vocational ministry, you should support people like me, who have been!

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Many people devote themselves to their work. And it is an easy step from there to show that this devotion has a strong religious bent. But does it follow that devotion to work is bending the knee to idolatry, giving service to mammon? This book says no, not necessarily.

Many people devote themselves to their work. And it is an easy step from there to show that this devotion has a strong religious bent. But does it follow that devotion to work is bending the knee to idolatry, giving service to mammon? This book says no, not necessarily. In many cases human work is co-creative with the Creator. Why, then, is there so little effort to explore the theological dimension of everyday work?

The principal impediment to a proper theological understanding of work is the church's voracious appetite to concentrate everything onto Sunday and its own institutional needs. The kingdom of God gets foreshortened to ecclesiastical boundaries so that the shop floor, the foundry, or the lumberyard and all other places of work are out of bounds. Another impediment keeps the doctrine of the laity too anemic to possess a creativity of its own.

This book lays a positive theological framework for a Christian understanding of work, be it manual, intellectual, service-related or not. It does this chiefly around the doctrine of the Trinity. It then turns to show how this system can underpin an ethics and spirituality of work.

Comments

Llanonte Llanonte
This is a philosophical treatise grounded in the trinitarian view of existence. Work, based on how we engage with the work of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit in our lives, has a significant depth of meaning. This book is worth the work it takes to delve into the depths and absorb the perspective. Only after really taking it in can one then integrate how it informs our own work.
elegant stranger elegant stranger
Larive begins this book strong by tackling the common approaches with regards to 'Theology of Work.' He critiques most conferences and teaching seminars as either spiritualizing work via 'spirituality of work,' or merely inculcating 'workplace ethics.' He describes the predicament well with Barbara Brown Zikmund's lament about the confusion of good Christians.

"The four ways we tell serious Christians to live out their vocation are either simplistic and shallow, or they are so demanding that people pale at the task. At the risk of caricature, we insist that an authentic understanding of Christian vocation: (1) has little to do with our jobs, (2) has something to do with all jobs, (3) has more to do with certain jobs, (4) or has everything to do with on-the-job and off-the-job existence. No wonder good Christians get confused." (Zikmund quoted in p3)

His central thesis is that God in present in all our work (2). He goes on to argue, using Miroslav Volf's model of the Triune God of Father/Mother as 'protological,' Son as 'eschatological,' and Spirit as 'pneumatological.' While conceptually, this is reasonable, his interpretation is to me rather wierd. By seeing God as Father/Mother being a Maintainer, Son as 'developing new things,' and Spirit as 'energy,' I cannot help but feel Larive's theology is unorthodox and modalistic.

Despite his efforts, I find that the reader can easily get lost in the technicality. In other words, having started with a good job of critiquing current theologies of work either as too 'spiritualizing' or too moralizing, his third way appears cloudy. Larive may have a point, but I have problems making sense of it.

conrade
Tiainar Tiainar
This book has changed fundamentally the way I approach my workaday life. The author's obvious grasp of difficult theological concepts and liberal use of dense, technical language can make the book somewhat unapproachable at times for the rest of us, but his classic writing structure (introduce, explain, conclude) goes a long way toward keeping the reader on track through tough ideas. He begins the book by discussing the current state of the work / spirituality connection in the Christian faith, and insight-fully critiquing the shortcomings. He moves on to integrate the concept of work into a formal theological framework. From this integration, he explores in depth the philosophical relationship of human work with each Person of the Trinity. Finally, he ties all the major themes together in a strong conclusion, giving the reader much to think about and apply to daily life and work.

It all sounds pretty heady, and it is, but the memorable things I have carried from this book (I read it over a year ago) have altered and redeemed my own view of work. Furthermore, I look forward to taking another crack at some of the more esoteric knowledge presented with the trust that there is much more good I can glean here. Larive goes a long way toward dignifying the often tedious and mundane tasks of everyday work with the spark of the divine. And better yet, he admirably achieves his goal of beginning to reconcile the Sunday life we experience in church with all the days that come after...
Doomwarden Doomwarden
Armand Larive weaves an elegant and deceptively simple argument about how our everyday work is fundamentally connected to our spirituality. I was taught growing up that you work hard during the week, play hard on Saturday and pray hard on Sunday. All three activities were completely separate from one another and had only distant connections like, "you can party on Saturday as long as you repent on Sunday" or "it doesn't matter how you make your money as long as you tithe." This worldview left me wanting when I entered the work world. It took me 15 years of deep searching to make the connections Larive arrives at in these pages.
God designed our bodies to be about a physical task. We are meant to do hard work until we die (Gen. 17-19) and that is not a bad thing when we can touch the eternal in those moments.
If you have difficulty finding God in your labor or you grew up with the disparate messages I did, then I would recommend this book.
If you have read this book I would also suggest the philosophy and poetry of Wendell Berry. Good stuff.
Well done Aramand. I can't wait for more.