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eBook Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson: All and Everything, First Series (Compass) ePub

eBook Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson: All and Everything, First Series (Compass) ePub

by G. I. Gurdjieff

  • ISBN: 0140194738
  • Category: Theology
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: G. I. Gurdjieff
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Later Printing Used edition (August 1, 1999)
  • Pages: 1248
  • ePub book: 1175 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1873 kb
  • Other: lrf txt lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 818

Description

Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson or An Objectively Impartial Criticism of the Life of Man is the first volume of the All and Everything trilogy written by the Greek-Armenian mystic G. I. Gurdjieff.

Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson or An Objectively Impartial Criticism of the Life of Man is the first volume of the All and Everything trilogy written by the Greek-Armenian mystic G. The All and Everything trilogy also includes Meetings with Remarkable Men (first published in 1963) and Life Is Real Only Then, When 'I Am' (first privately printed in 1974).

All and everything, first series. Ten Books in Three Series. Three books under the title of Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson. An Objectively Impartial Criticism of the Life of Man. SECOND SERIES. Two books under the common title of Meetings with Remarkable Men. THIRD SERIES. To destroy, mercilessly and without any compromise whatever, in the mentation and feelings of the reader, the beliefs and views, by centuries rooted in him, about everything existing in the world. To acquaint the reader with the material required for a new creation and to prove the soundness and good quality of it.

Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson. This is Gurdjieff’s magnum opus

Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson. All serious followers of Gurdjieff's teaching study this book. This is Gurdjieff’s magnum opus. Regarding this series, Gurdjieff said, I had decided with the contents of the first series of books to achieve the destruction, in the consciousness and feelings of people, of deep-rooted convictions which in my opinion are false and quite contradictory to reality. Gurdjieff’s friendly advice is to read each of his written expositions at least thrice.

Gurdjieff considered AAE his magnum opus. Gurdjieff was the ultimate rascal mystic and Beelzebub's tales is a tour de force

Gurdjieff considered AAE his magnum opus. He used the book to transmit his teachings in a code that can be as vexing as it is funny and instructive, and that is virtually unbreakable for all but the purest afficionado. Gurdjieff was the ultimate rascal mystic and Beelzebub's tales is a tour de force. I actually enjoyed this book alot! It took many years and many false starts and I have only read it through once but it is clear this book deserves an important place in the history of literature.

Электронная книга "Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson: All and Everything, First Series", G. Gurdjieff

Электронная книга "Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson: All and Everything, First Series", G. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson: All and Everything, First Series" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

This novel beautifully brings to life the visions of humanity for which Gurdjieff has become esteemed. The reader is given a detailed discussion of all matters physical, natural, and spiritual, from the creation of the cosmos to man's teleological purpose in the universe.

Gurdjieff's "Beelzebub Tales to His Grandson" is not your everyday type book. Its intentions are not to entertain, but to shock the reader into conscious awareness of the many mechanisms that control his/her own life. Ions after his fall from heaven we find Beelzebub completely transformed through experience into the wisest of beings.

31 quotes from Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson: ‘an honest being who does not behave absurdly has no chance at all of. .

31 quotes from Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson: ‘an honest being who does not behave absurdly has no chance at all of becoming famous, or even of bein.

About this title: Synopsis: With Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson, G. Gurdjieff intended to "destroy . Gurdjieff intended to "destroy, mercilessly. the beliefs and views about everything existing in the world. This novel beautifully brings to life the visions of humanity for which Gurdjieff has become esteemed. Product Description: Rare book. Bibliographic Details. Title: Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson: All and.

With Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson, G. I. Gurdjieff intended to "destroy, mercilessly . . . the beliefs and views about everything existing in the world." This novel beautifully brings to life the visions of humanity for which Gurdjieff has become esteemed. Beelzebub, a man of worldly (and other-worldly) wisdom, shares with his grandson the anecdotes, personal philosophies, and lessons learned from his own life.The reader is given a detailed discussion of all matters physical, natural, and spiritual, from the creation of the cosmos to man's teleological purpose in the universe. This edition of Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson--the first single-volume paperback to appear in English--restores the original, authoritative translation.

Comments

Rose Of Winds Rose Of Winds
In my mind, this is one of the most unique books that I have read thus far. But it is a difficult one, intentionally. Gurdjieff (as many know) taught that man very rarely if ever really pays attention to what they do in life, passing through life more as machines, without stopping to really observe the self, or anything else for that matter. This book was written intentionally by Gurdjieff to greatly slow the reader down and cause them to really have to focus on what they are reading. I think this is good, though I am glad that not many books are written like this. Though I feel it is good, because it does cause you to really pay attention, and being that the book is very confusing and takes some real insight and re-reading of passages at times to attempt to follow what is being said, it has the effect of causing you to slowly observe your own feelings and re-actions as you read it. Which if you labor through the whole book, this process of personal awareness becomes more and more apparent as you go. Would I recommend this book to everyone, hecks no, if you are diving into it just to have an interesting read, or perhaps know little to nothing about Gurdjieffs Tradition of teaching, this is NOT the place to start, as it will undoubtedly turn you off of his methods. Like any great thinker, from Plato, to Crowley, trying to dive right into the meat of things, albeit possible, but not advised.
My suggestion if you just want to know a little more about what Gurdjieff taught, then begin with what most do,
"In Search of the Miraculous" by P.D.Ouspensky, a great copy which can be found here on Amazon. If you still after reading that book, find that you are intrigued, than I would recommend, perhaps, attempting this book.
No matter your level of understanding of Gurdjieffs teachings, I would approach this book like a marathon, don't read anything else while reading this, read maybe 30 to 50 pages in a sitting, and allow some time right after, and before sitting down to read again, to really let your mind play over what you have read. Guaranteed there will be times where you want to throw this book out the window in complete frustration, and there will also be times where you will really find yourself in appreciation and understanding of it.
Now I can't go and say that the clouds parted, and I became some spiritual master after reading this, for one, I like Gurdjieffs methods, but I'm not a died in the wool student of his either. Nor do I think his intention (personally) with this book was not to be some bible or Brahmanical text which suddenly opens the aspirant to spiritual sanctuary and understanding. I do feel it was intended to be a tool in the practice of Gurdjieffs teachings, which threw reading threw it over and over again, one becomes sounder in its teachings, and grows a greater understanding of personal awareness. An obtuse book, but if you feel up to the task, it is well worth the effort. Be warned though as one reviewer here remarked, after awhile you will find yourself talking and writing at times as obtuse as the book as written. lol.
Coidor Coidor
Despite the fact that many readers have difficulty with this book, it is well worth devoting a good deal of time to it. It could be said, in fact, that the more you put into it, the more it delivers to you. In my view, the major stumbling block is the opinion, that many readers seem to arrive at, that Gurdjieff is playing some sophisticated kind of joke on the reader. This, in fact, is not the case at all. But to appreciate its content, one must first realize that, aside from having a literal meaning - which can at times seem non-sensical - the book has a completely different allegorical meaning which not only makes sense but can deliver profound revelations to the reader.
Gurdjieff said: “I have buried in this book certain bones, so that certain dogs with great curiosity and strong scent may dig down to them and, strange thing, when they have done so, are men”
Wyameluna Wyameluna
As other reviewers pointed out, this is the revised edition. Unwanted, unauthorized, unapproved by Gurdjieff ... Self-appointed "heirs" have altered the original text, which was carefully and meticulously (to put it mildly) constructed by Gurdjieff and approved for publication. We only have their word to go on that they were "appointed" for this "sacred" task of revising Gurdjieff's work.

Compare the unrevised version ... if you can find it ... to this one. Then judge for yourself the results of the revisions.

See John Henderson's book, Hidden Meanings and Picture Form Language, for a real exposition of this travesty.
Doulkree Doulkree
The title given above was the subtitle to the original main title, "All and Everything." The present electronic version is a faithful rendering of the second (officially revised and preferred) edition of this monumental work, as far as I can tell from spot reading. It has a few flubs, such as chapter heads run into the main text. But the content seems to be there. As to that content, it is an incomparable omnibus treatment of the universe and all history by a genuinely great spiritual master of the twentieth century. It moves from cosmic perspective to the very, very earthy. It is brilliant beyond usual standards as well as full of good laughs. As the author explains, the narrative style and the very sentence structure, like the subject matter, are intentionally made to thwart automatic (habitual) reading. The result is that everything in the book is capable of taking you for a marvelous ride beyond conceptuality. You will either be frustrated and disgusted or fascinated and aroused. If the latter, be prepared to spend many a year reading and re-reading.
Kupidon Kupidon
Obligatory reading for any intelligent searcher for what is real and what is not. Needs to be revisited over ones life to see that I have not yet approached the real depth of the book, just some pieces here and there, that evoke a feeling in me of the importance of human life as it could be, and the mediocrity of it as I live it, most of the time. Not an easy read at all. It can be a challenge to get through a paragraph sometimes, well over my capacity to read, yet, with repetition, little by little, it comes, not because the book gets easier, but because somehow I begin, at times, to rise up to its level. And I have to say I first read this when I was 36 and now I am 73, and starting it again.
Nikok Nikok
The one disadvantage of this edition of Gurdjieff's "flying cathedral" is that some of the pages don't correspond to the 1950 edition, especially in the chapter "Hypnosis". If you use the older Guide and Index, the references to some parts of the chapter (and consequent chapters) are no longer valid.

Many corrections were made to the 1950 edition, but not all.

The printing is on lower quality paper than the Dutton (and Two Rivers) editions.