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eBook BCP Large Print Edition Prayer Book Burgundy calfskin leather 707 ePub

eBook BCP Large Print Edition Prayer Book Burgundy calfskin leather 707 ePub

by The Church of England

  • ISBN: 0521506182
  • Category: Worship and Devotion
  • Subcategory: Bibles
  • Author: The Church of England
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 30, 1981)
  • ePub book: 1798 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1471 kb
  • Other: lrf docx mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 820

Description

The Book of Common Prayer is not just the old and well-loved prayer book of the Church of England.

The Book of Common Prayer is not just the old and well-loved prayer book of the Church of England. The larger The Book of Common Prayer is not just the old and well-loved prayer book of the Church of England.

The Book of Common Prayer is the old and well-loved prayer book of the Church of England, in use since the 16th .

The Book of Common Prayer is the old and well-loved prayer book of the Church of England, in use since the 16th century. It offers a choice of presentation pages, to cater for various occasions.

This Prayer Book is bound in the finest calfskin leather, with gilt edges and ribbon marker and comes in an attractive slipcase that will protect it throughout its life.

The Church of England. The Prayer Book Society has produced a series of videos which can be used by anyone seeking guidance on how to conduct services according to the Book of Common Prayer. These are on the Prayer Book Society site

The Church of England. A Church Near You. The Archbishop of Canterbury. The Archbishop of York. A Christian presence in every community. These are on the Prayer Book Society site. You can also download The Book of Common Prayer (1662) in PDF as printed by John Baskerville in 1762.

This is a beautiful BCP which we purchased as a gift for my grandson on the occasion of his Confirmation.

Book of Common Prayer, Pew, Black. This is a beautiful BCP which we purchased as a gift for my grandson on the occasion of his Confirmation. It was very reasonably priced, embossed, and delivered on time. He loves it. This would be a good prayerbook for anyone especially those who need a little larger print. We're a Christian presence in every community across England and in Europe. This particular style comes in a burgundy hardcover and will be helpful for anyone needing slightly larger print for ease of reading.

Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by other Christian churches historically related to Anglicanism. The original book, published in 1549 in the reign of Edward VI, was a product of the English Reformation following the break with Rome. The work of 1549 was the first prayer book to include the complete forms of service for daily and Sunday worship in English

THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER : Church of England - Society for . 1864 BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER Leather UNITED CHURCH OF ENGLAND.

THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER : Church of England - Society for Promoting Christian. The Book of Common Prayer: As Proposed in 1928 by The Church of England. 1864 BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER Leather UNITED CHURCH OF ENGLAND AND IRELAND.

With: Church of England. The Psalter or Psalms of Dauid. London: Robert Barker, 1605. The Book of common prayer. Boston Public Library (Rare Books Department) copy bound in early calfskin double-panelled in gilt and blind. The central panels have gold-blocked cornerpieces and contain the armorial super-ex-libris of a Knight of the Garter. Still visible within the now deteriorated escutcheons are two crescents above a fess - possibly the arms of Sir Henry Lee, of Ditchley (1533-1611), Champion to Queen Elizabeth I and Master of the Armoury.

This Prayer Book is bound in the finest calfskin leather, with gilt edges and ribbon marker and comes in an attractive slipcase that will protect it throughout its life. The larger type size will prove a boon to people who are visually impaired - or who just require reading comfort. The Book of Common Prayer of 1662 is the old and well-loved prayer book of the Church of England - and one of the classic English texts; its prayers and expressions have helped to mold the English language into what it is today. Such phrases as 'with this ring I thee wed' and 'in sure and certain hope of the resurrection to eternal life' have become familiar words with which we mark events in our lives. This Prayer Book provides the complete 1662 services - including the traditional forms of the baptism and marriage ceremoniesnies. It will make a perfect gift for those who want to mark a special occasion with this enduring text.

Comments

Ffleg Ffleg
The 1662 Book of Common Prayer is one of the enduring achievements of the English Reformation. It is a masterpiece of lucid and elegant writing that has nourished the spiritual life of Christians in the Anglican tradition for hundreds of years. The desire of Cranmer to clearly communicate the Gospel and to guide reflection upon the Scriptures is clear. Phrases and prayers from the BCP will make their way deep into the mind and heart of anyone who uses it regularly in worship.

The theology of the services was driven by the intention to lead the congregation into repentance and a life of sober virtue under the rule of godly princes. This lends the BCP an austere and 'dry' feeling, reminding the worshipper of the seriousness of sin and the steady approach of eternal life and the judgement. The communion service, for instance, lacks the vibrant resurrection joy that most Christians often find in the eucharist, instead leading us step by step through our unworthiness until we are ready to receive the assurance of Christ's atoning sacrifice. The language of the BCP is also becoming archaic, and so revised editions that update the vocabulary and broaden the theological palette have been released in most Anglican dioceses around the world. But the BCP is the headwater of English worship after the Reformation, and it is worth going back to as a source of devotion and encouragement.

'Almighty God, unto whom all hearts be open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hid: Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of thy Holy Spriit, that we may perfectly love thee, and worthily magnify thy holy Name; through Christ our Lord. Amen.'
JOGETIME JOGETIME
To begin, I highly recommend this volume to both Anglicans and all Christians as a living testament to a magisterial approach to the worship of Our Lord.
This edition of the Book of Common Prayer is the standard for worship in the Church of England, and the foundation for the various editions of the prayer book now used in the American branches of the Anglican Church. While controversy continues to surround the current (1979) edition, the heritage represented by this volume is one that is a part of the theology and worship of all sons and daughters of the English Reformation.
This work also represents a true doctrinal structure based on scripture and holy tradition as understood by Cranmer, Hooker, and the English reformers. Contrary to much modern confusion, the goal of the reformers was not mere compromise or a via media, but a return to the sound practice and teachings of the patristic, pre-medieval church; thus the term Reformed Catholicism, as represented by the Protestant reforms to the medieval catholic tradition.
This book also represents the foundation of much of our language and literature. Along with the King James Version of the Bible, most generations of educated Englishman and Americans learned to read and think through reading, praying and reciting from these holy works.
Thus, there is much here for all Christians, and all those who are interested in Christianity and our American heritage. This book will be one of the best purchases you ever make.
Enjoy!
Kearanny Kearanny
This Book of Common Prayer (1662) is the 'primary' BCP, used by the Church of England proper, the original branch of the Anglicans. There have been many books that have had the title 'Book of Common Prayer' since the first one appeared in 1549; it has been used continuously in one edition or another in the Anglican tradition since 1559; the 'main' edition remains this 1662 edition. Churches in other nations (Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, the United States, Canada) have done revised Books of Common Prayer, but they always use this as the touchstone.

A bishop in the Episcopal church once said to me, 'We don't have a theology that we have to believe -- what we have is the prayerbook.' Please forgive the absence of context for this phrase -- while he would say that this statement in isolation is an exaggeration, and I would agree, nonetheless his statement serves to highlight both the importance of and the strength of the Book of Common Prayer.

To be an Anglican, one does not have to subscribe to any particular systematic theological framework. One does not have to practice a particular brand of liturgical style. One does not have to have an approved politico-theological viewpoint. One can be a conservative, liberal or moderate; one can be high church, low church, or broad; one can be charismatic, evangelical, or mainline traditional -- one can be any number of things in a rich diversity of choices, and the Book of Common Prayer can still be the book upon which spirituality and worship is centred.

The Book of Common Prayer is not, in fact, a book that changed my life. It is a book that changes my life. Even though it is not the primary book of my own church, it continues to provide for spiritual insight and development; it continues to guide my worship and my theology. It continues to help me grow. The words are part of a liturgy now shared by Catholic, Lutheran, Methodist, Presbyterian and other liturgical churches, in different combination and priority.

Gerry Janzen, an Anglican professor at my seminary, said to me recently as we were lunching and having a fascinating and wide-ranging conversation (in a unique way that only Gerry Janzen is capable of doing) that he strives for that kind of memory and understanding that is so complete that one forgets what one has learned. He recounted to me his experience of working with his book on Job -- he had done a lot of research, development of ideas, writing, and organisation, and then set it aside for a time. When he picked up the topic later, he decided to begin by writing, and then go back to the research, other notes and writings he had done earlier. He was surprised to see, in comparing the work, that he had in fact duplicated much of the material -- he had internalised the information, incorporated it so well into his thinking and being, that it came forward without effort. It is this kind of relationship I feel I have developed with the Book of Common Prayer.

To be sure, there are pages of information that I don't know. I haven't memorised the historical documents; I still consult the calendars; I haven't learned all of the collects by heart. But it has become a part of me. When was asked to put together a liturgy for a houseblessing for Episcopalian friends, there were rooms that called for collects that had not been written -- I wrote new collects and inserted them into the liturgy.

'Can you do that?' the householder asked, worried about the flow and the approval of the priest doing the blessing.

'I trust Kurt to write collects -- his probably belong in the BCP,' the priest said in response, and I appreciated her vote of confidence. That was perhaps the first confirmation to me of this sense of incorporation of the book into my life.

From his first edition, Cranmer distinguished in his terminology the words minister and priest, and the two should not be viewed as interchangeable. A priest is a minister, but a minister need not be a priest. This become part of the early development of the idea of all people being ministers to each other, which is also a concept that has varying acceptance and fulfillment in actual practice over the history of Anglicanism.

One of my favourite prayers derives from this book, part of the English prayer book from the very first one in 1549:

Almighty God, who hast given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplication unto thee, and hast promised through thy well-beloved Son that when two or three are gathered together in his name, thou wilt be in the midst of them: Fulfill now, O Lord, the desires and petitions of thy servants, as may be best for us, granting us in this world knowledge of thy truth, and in the world to come, life everlasting. Amen.

This prayer, like many things in the BCP, has moved to a new location from the first edition, but nonetheless the spirit of the BCP shows a circuitous but continuous development from the first English Prayer Book to the current varieties. Likewise, other denominations have gleaned insights, prayers and structures from this and other versions of the BCP.

The Book of Common Prayer, as a single unit and as a greater tradition of which this book is a part, is an Anglican gift to the world.