cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » An Open Book: Chapters fom a Reader's Life
eBook An Open Book: Chapters fom a Reader's Life ePub

eBook An Open Book: Chapters fom a Reader's Life ePub

by Michael Dirda

  • ISBN: 0393326144
  • Category: Arts and Literature
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Michael Dirda
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (December 17, 2004)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1101 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1469 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf txt lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 836

Description

Start by marking An Open Book: Chapters fom a Reader's Life as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Start by marking An Open Book: Chapters fom a Reader's Life as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

An Open Book: Chapters from a Reader's Life by Michael Dirda. Readings: Essays and Literary Entertainments by Michael Dirda. From Publishers Weekly Longtime Washington Post Book World staff writer and Pulitzer-winning critic Dirda writes a guide to reading and its life lessons ranging widely and pithily through the universal themes of learning, school, work, love, childhood and spiritual guidance. Dirda's message is simple: if reading is to be life enhancing, we need to focus our attention on books that are rewarding. Dirda encourages readers to forge a subjective and intimate relationship with books.

Chapters fom a Reader's Life. Michael Dirda (Author). Our Retail Price:£16. In An Open Book, one of the most delightful memoirs to emerge in years, the acclaimed literary journalist Michael Dirda re-creates his boyhood in rust-belt Ohio, first in the working-class town of Lorain, then at Oberlin College. From Pulitzer Prize-winning book critic Michael Dirda comes a collection of his most personal and engaging essays on the literary life-the perfect companion for any lover of books. Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting, and Living with Books.

An Open Book: Chapters f. .has been added to your Cart. This book is his autobiographica literaria, his attempt to recount the books he was exposed to growing up and how they shaped him. I would only recommend the second half, starting just after the young Michael comes home from trying to run away.

Michael Dirda, American Book critic. Recipient Pulitzer Prize for distinguished criticism, 1993. Member National Book Critics Circle (former board directors). Currently, he is a book columnist for the Post. They have three sons: Christopher (b 1984), Michael (b 1987), and Nathaniel (b 1990).

Organized by significant life events and abounding with quotations from great writers and thinkers, Book by Book showcases Dirda's considerable knowledge, which he wears lightly

Organized by significant life events and abounding with quotations from great writers and thinkers, Book by Book showcases Dirda's considerable knowledge, which he wears lightly. Favoring showing rather than telling, Dirda draws the reader deeper into the classics, as well as lesser-known works of literature, history, and philosophy, always with an eye to what is relevant to how we might better understand our lives.

Coauthors & Alternates.

An Open Book: Coming of Age in the Heartland. ISBN 9780393057560 (978-0-393-05756-0) Hardcover, W W Norton & Co Inc, 2003. Coauthors & Alternates.

Books with the subject: Dirda, Michael. An Open Book: Chapters from a Reader's Life - Michael Dirda. Critics, journalists, dirda, michael, united states. Readings - Michael Dirda. Dirda, Michael, Books and Reading, Essays, Literature. Book by Book: Notes on Reading and Life - Michael Dirda.

"A love story, full of a passion for literature and marked by intellectual vigor."―Bernadette Murphy, Los Angeles Times

"All that kid wants to do is stick his nose in a book," Michael Dirda's steelworker father used to complain, worried about his son's passion for reading. In An Open Book, one of the most delightful memoirs to emerge in years, the acclaimed literary journalist Michael Dirda re-creates his boyhood in rust-belt Ohio, first in the working-class town of Lorain, then at Oberlin College. In addition to his colorful family and friends, An Open Book also features the great writers and fictional characters who fueled Dirda's imagination: from Green Lantern to Sherlock Holmes, from Candy to Proust. The result is an affectionate homage to small-town America―summer jobs, school fights, sweepstakes contests, and first dates―as well as a paean to what could arguably be called the last great age of reading. "Dirda is a superb literary essayist."―Harold Bloom "Michael Dirda's memoir―no surprise to me―is so good that I went up to the attic meaning to send him one of my antique Big Little books as a salute to excellence...A great job. I'll be buying An Open Book for my children and grandchildren."―Russell Baker, author of Growing Up "Here, in An Open Book, is the show and tell of a wonderful American story, everything coming together in the immemorial dance of literature and memory, of history and gossip, and of the deeply felt, bittersweet story (his own) of a young life. Read it and rejoice."―George Garrett "A lovely, unapologetically nostalgic remembrance of growing up in a more innocent America, but it is also the touching story of one person's lifelong love affair with words."―June Sawyer, San Francisco Chronicle "Dirda inhabits each book he reads. Inhabits it―and makes a space alongside it for us to join him....He is a rare treasure."―James Sallis, Boston Sunday Globe

Comments

Jare Jare
Michael Dirda is the chief book reviewer at the Washington Post. This book is his autobiographica literaria, his attempt to recount the books he was exposed to growing up and how they shaped him.

I would only recommend the second half, starting just after the young Michael comes home from trying to run away. The first half isn't so great.

Though I personally enjoyed it, I don't think it was very well written. After a few pages, it seems like he's just mentioning title after title without going into much detail at all about any of them, or precisely how they helped to mold his mind. "In the afternoons I would thrill to the adventures of John Carter of Mars. I also loved Robinson Crusoe." That sort of thing.

Dirda seems to have no trouble mentioning the books that he's read or that affected him, but as for explaining how they shaped his personality, he doesn't do that very well here. Maybe in one of his other books. True, he does that for a few books when discussing his Oberlin application, but that's the exception. Now that I think about it, this book doesn't give you much of an idea about the author's personality at all, beyond just that he's from a working-class family and has pretty much always liked reading books.

There's really no overarching theme, and Dirda changes topics so frequently that one must pay close attention: nearly every paragraph is about something else. Rarely do you see a sequence of several paragraphs about the same theme or situation. I think Dirda would have done better to present this as a disjointed series of vignettes, since that's pretty much what it is. Running all these disparate paragraphs together as if he were telling a coherent narrative gets trying.

If you love books, you'll often find a smile of recognition on your face while going through this; for me, it lacks the magic of character or circumstances to warrant a re-read.

Lastly, I would have to say this book humbled me, so maybe I'm angry at it. I thought I was well read, but this guy. Jesus H.!
Nnulam Nnulam
A very good book, writen in a way to make you want to continue reading it and feel relaxing.
Duzshura Duzshura
I have read most of Michael's (and, yes, I feel as though I know him well enough after reading this book to call him by his first name) books and always find them both highly entertaining and informative. I am fascinated by all things literary--including other people that are. On the surface, this is the story of one man's journey through life who befriended literature at an early age as, perhaps, a means of dealing with the usual insecurities. Reading became an obsession and he was able to parlay this love (with the help of a "little" talent and intelligence) into a Pulitzer Prize winning career. I wish he would have been able to spend more time talking about individual books and authors within the context of his own interests and life experience; however, he pointed out at the beginning he would not be using this particular venue for such.

I found his memoirs delightfully readable.
Whitehammer Whitehammer
Our book group was fortunate enough to have Michael Dirda attend our discussion of this memoir. He is delightful, witty and steeped in the pleasures of reading, just as his book is. It's the story of an insecure, highly intelligent boy from a family of limited means who engages the world through literature. He is guided by several inspiring teachers, but mostly is self-taught as to what makes good reading and the lessons in life to be gleaned from books. While his keen intelligence sets him apart from his family in many respects, he also lives an ordinary and in some respects idyllic boyhood in Ohio.

As Michael Dirda said of one of the books he recently reviewed for the Washington Post, "you really should read this book."