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eBook The Little Girl Who Fought the Great Depression: Shirley Temple and 1930s America ePub

eBook The Little Girl Who Fought the Great Depression: Shirley Temple and 1930s America ePub

by John F. Kasson

  • ISBN: 0393240797
  • Category: Arts and Literature
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: John F. Kasson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (April 14, 2014)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1418 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1331 kb
  • Other: lrf txt doc mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 197

Description

The Little Girl Who Fough. has been added to your Cart. Cultural historian John F. Kasson does an excellent analysis in his book on Shirley Temple and the culture of Hollywood embedded in .

The Little Girl Who Fough. history during the 1930s Depression when he compares her career to the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt. He points out that both had infectious smiles, an uplifting message, emitted warm-hearted encouragement to the American public, and were phenomenally successful.

The Great Depression―not to mention Shirley Temple and Franklin . Last month my book club discussed this book on Shirley Temple and found it full of insights on a range of issues.

The Great Depression―not to mention Shirley Temple and Franklin Roosevelt―will never look the same. of its human profit centers, no matter how small.

Kasson, John F. When in 1935 she soared to the position of top American and international box-office attraction, they were astounded. led, confounded all expectations. Fox producers, distributors, and exhibitors worked energetically to keep her star aloft, but they were never sanguine they could do so. For them, the most exciting and suspenseful Shirley Temple story concerned how long her charmed life as a child star could last

308 pages : 25 cm. Her image appeared in periodicals and advertisements roughly twenty times daily; she rivaled FDR and Edward VIII as the most photographed person in the world.

308 pages : 25 cm. Her portrait brightened the homes of countless admirers: from a black laborer's cabin in South Carolina to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover's recreation room in Washington, DC. A few years later her smile cheered the secret bedchamber of Anne Frank in Amsterdam. For four consecutive years Shirley Temple was the world's box-office champion, a record never equaled.

Distinguished cultural historian John F. Kasson shows how, amid the deprivation and despair of the Great Depression, Shirley Temple radiated . John . asson, writes a unique approach. This book also focuses on the 1930s and the depression. Kasson shows how, amid the deprivation and despair of the Great Depression, Shirley Temple radiated optimism and plucky good cheer that lifted the spirits of millions and shaped their collective character for generations to come. How much affect this little star had on the Country. I have read many times that Shirley Temple was the number one box office attraction four years in a row. She became popular during a very difficult time in America.

Shirley Temple once killed off a British cultural weekly. Kasson’s book resists easy classification.

For four consecutive years Shirley Temple was the world’s box-office champion, a record never equaled. By early 1935 her mail was reported as four thousand letters a week, and hers was the second-most popular girl’s name in the country. What distinguished Shirley Temple from every other Hollywood star of the period-and everyone since-was how brilliantly she shone. Amid the deprivation and despair of the Great Depression, Shirley Temple radiated optimism and plucky good cheer that lifted the spirits of millions and shaped their collective character for generations to come.

Shirley Temple was all-singing, all-dancing candy floss. Shirley played a pivotal role, Kasson says in a lively political book, as the most famous and commodified child in the world. He quotes John Updike’s dictum that America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy. Against the backdrop of Roosevelt’s New Deal, as the shining image of popular culture and the dreams of her fans, she became. Kasson shows how, amid the deprivation and despair of the Great Depression, Shirley Temple radiated optimism and plucky good cheer that lifted the spirits of millions and shaped their collective character for generations to come

Distinguished cultural historian John F.

How the smile and fortitude of a child actress revived a nation.

Her image appeared in periodicals and advertisements roughly twenty times daily; she rivaled FDR and Edward VIII as the most photographed person in the world. Her portrait brightened the homes of countless admirers: from a black laborer’s cabin in South Carolina and young Andy Warhol’s house in Pittsburgh to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover’s recreation room in Washington, DC, and gangster “Bumpy” Johnson’s Harlem apartment. A few years later her smile cheered the secret bedchamber of Anne Frank in Amsterdam as young Anne hid from the Nazis.

For four consecutive years Shirley Temple was the world’s box-office champion, a record never equaled. By early 1935 her mail was reported as four thousand letters a week, and hers was the second-most popular girl’s name in the country.

What distinguished Shirley Temple from every other Hollywood star of the period―and everyone since―was how brilliantly she shone. Amid the deprivation and despair of the Great Depression, Shirley Temple radiated optimism and plucky good cheer that lifted the spirits of millions and shaped their collective character for generations to come. Distinguished cultural historian John F. Kasson shows how the most famous, adored, imitated, and commodified child in the world astonished movie goers, created a new international culture of celebrity, and revolutionized the role of children as consumers.

Tap-dancing across racial boundaries with Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, foiling villains, and mending the hearts and troubles of the deserving, Shirley Temple personified the hopes and dreams of Americans. To do so, she worked virtually every day of her childhood, transforming her own family as well as the lives of her fans.

32 photographs

Comments

Wizard Wizard
Last month my book club discussed this book on Shirley Temple and found it full of insights on a range of issues. We selected the book because one of our members had always admired Temple. With one exception, we were born after her years of glory, but had watched her movies on TV or remembered her days as a public official. We all agreed she was amazingly talented.
Most astounding was her vital role in Roosevelt’s New Deal as a symbol of hope and new life. With her incredible cuteness and sunny disposition, she was a perfect antidote to the bleakness of the Great Depression. Kasson does an outstanding job linking her persona to the political winds of the 1930s and showing how politicians exploited her.
Of course, in today’s climate, Temple’s sexual appeal looms large. Kasson directly addresses the issues associated with her baby face looks, her innocence, and her sunny friendliness. An issue ignored at the time, it seems central today. The book raises all kinds of issues about children in show business, stage parents, and pedophilia. Kasson deserves substantial credit for addressing these issues head on.
Another fascinating aspect of Temple’s career carefully analyzed by Kasson is her relationship with her African American costar, Bill Robinson. I have watched Temple’s movies for the dancing, and her duets with Robinson are indeed dynamite. Once you remember the poisonous race relations of the 1930s, it is indeed remarkable that she and Robinson were paired.
Overall, the book is wonderfully written, easy to read and filled with insights. I enthusiastically recommend it.
YSOP YSOP
An excellent book. Congratulations, Mr. Kasson.

Setting the story of Shirley Temple in the context of the depression was a great idea. For those unfamiliar with the 1930s, this book is a good introduction.

I liked it all, but particularly Chapter 3, "Dancing Along the Color Line," in which the author gives a fascinating look at Bill "Bojangles" Robinson and at other African American performers. The footnotes give leads to other books about these great actors and dancers which I intend to read. (One is Rusty E. Frank's "Tap! The Greatest Tap Dance Stars and Their Stories, 1900-1955.)
Llanonte Llanonte
A lesson for those who believe in "keep SMILING, all will be well!" I know Shirley was a great inspiration for children of her generation, my mother was one of them. Thespian, singer, dancer and member of the band through her school years, also actively involved in the war effort and charities, the young adults of that time wanted to do it all and did. As children of the "fifties" my sister and I were raised by a strong woman who knew how to have fun but taught us responsibilty, dependably and the desire to do our best for our community and ourselves. We loved Shirley Temple and tapped our way through childhood and knew we could accomplish anything we put our minds to. This was carried through to my daughter who also loved Shirley Temple and has become a strong woman. I love the grace Shirley showed her parents even though they were not deserving, this says much for her character. She is one great lady. This book is a great tribute.
THOMAS THOMAS
Cultural historian John F. Kasson does an excellent analysis in his book on Shirley Temple and the culture of Hollywood embedded in U.S. history during the 1930s Depression when he compares her career to the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt. He points out that both had infectious smiles, an uplifting message, emitted warm-hearted encouragement to the American public, and were phenomenally successful. Kasson also parallels less overtly that both overcame tremendous obstacles, constantly were challenged to maintain a positive public image, and set new standards for crossing boundaries. FDR's challenge was physical (polio), Temple's was being a child. No other child in U.S. history was able to maintain center stage in a film featuring mature, talented, savvy male co-stars. The book focuses on Temple, of course, and we learn much more about her family, her role in the Hollywood studio system, the new role of the child as consumer, and the fright of being mobbed by adoring fans. Well-written and highly readable.
Wrathshaper Wrathshaper
Not just another Shirley biography. This one puts her in context with what was happening in the world at the time and what an impact this gifted child made on it. Very enjoyable, well written and interesting.
Fordrellador Fordrellador
I guess I was expecting more about Shirley Temple and less about the history of the great depression and President Roosevelt and politics. I stopped reading after a few chapters.
Lli Lli
and the management and mismanagement of a precocious talented little girl , who was caught up in a prepared life
Really interesting story on Temple's Hollywood life. Disturbing at times too, as when the author describes older, lecherous men who sexually harassed the young star when she was just a child. She could put on a good act and light up a room with her smile, but behind-the-scenes all was not to happy with Shirley Temple's life.

In fact she eventually left Hollywood and later became a diplomat--an Ambassador to an African country where she did outstanding work. But it also shows you the under-belly of Hollywood and it's power-hungry agents and mangers.