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eBook Townie: A Memoir ePub

eBook Townie: A Memoir ePub

by Andre Dubus III

  • ISBN: 0393340678
  • Category: Arts and Literature
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Andre Dubus III
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (February 6, 2012)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1905 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1871 kb
  • Other: txt mbr docx azw
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 718

Description

Much of the story in Townie: A Memoir reveals what that life was like for the young boy, and how he eventually came to change how he looked at fighting; how he eventually learned how to deal with that rage that arose in him.

Ships from and sold by Global Shipping. Much of the story in Townie: A Memoir reveals what that life was like for the young boy, and how he eventually came to change how he looked at fighting; how he eventually learned how to deal with that rage that arose in him. In this excerpt, he shows us what that felt like

From these facts, it would be natural to assume that Townie: A Memoir would have a strong literary flavour: that authors and books would feature on almost every page; that the writing life would be extensively chronicled.

Andre Dubus III (born September 11, 1959) is an American novelist and short story writer. He is a member of the faculty at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

After their parents divorced in the 1970s, Andre Dubus III and his three siblings grew up with their exhausted working mother in a depressed Massachusetts mill town saturated with drugs and crime. To protect himself and those he loved from street violence, Andre learned to use his fists so well that he was even scared of himself.

a memoir ·. Andre Dubus III. W. norton & company

a memoir ·. norton & company. Townie draws on material from three previously published essays by Andre Dubus III: Tracks and Ties, originally published in 1993 in Epoch, reprinted in the Pushcart Prize Anthology XIX and The Best American Essays of 1994 (New York: Houghton Mifflin); the foreword to Andre Dubus: Tributes (New Orleans: Xavier Press, 2001); and Home, from Death by Pad Thai (New. York: Three Rivers Press, 2006). Lyrics from Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen.

Andre Dubus III recalls his upbringing in a Massachusetts mill town, and the tormentors he and his siblings had to. .By Andre Dubus III. 387 pp. Darcey Steinke’s most recent book is the memoir Easter Everywhere.

Andre Dubus III recalls his upbringing in a Massachusetts mill town, and the tormentors he and his siblings had to fight through.

Andre Dubus III is the author of a collection of short fiction, The Cage Keeper and Other Stories, and the novels Bluesman, House of Sand and Fog, and The Garden of Last Days, and the memoir Townie.

October 9, 2018 ·. WED, JAN 23.

Andre Dubus III. Download (epub, 599 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Andre Dubus III is something of a household name when it comes to books: His novel House of Sand . Becoming a writer helped Andre Dubus III forge a relationship with his father, but making himself completely whole took more. Michele McDonald/ Globe Staff/ File 1992).

Andre Dubus III is something of a household name when it comes to books: His novel House of Sand and Fog’’ was an Oprah Book Club pick, a finalist for the National Book Award, and made into a movie. He’s also the son of one of America’s most respected short-story authors, the late Andre Dubus, whose most ardent admirers were.

"Dubus relives, absent self-pity or blame, a life shaped by bouts of violence and flurries of tenderness." ―Vanity Fair

After their parents divorced in the 1970s, Andre Dubus III and his three siblings grew up with their overworked mother in a depressed Massachusetts mill town saturated with drugs and everyday violence. Nearby, his father, an eminent author, taught on a college campus and took the kids out on Sundays. The clash between town and gown, between the hard drinking, drugging, and fighting of "townies" and the ambitions of students debating books and ideas, couldn’t have been more stark. In this unforgettable memoir, acclaimed novelist Dubus shows us how he escaped the cycle of violence and found empathy in channeling the stories of others―bridging, in the process, the rift between his father and himself.

Comments

White_Nigga White_Nigga
I liked the book so much I read it twice. I used to work in a town similar to Haverhill, MA, and many of my teen age clients were similar to Andre. His divorced mother worked hard, but found it difficult to support four children on her earnings as a social worker and the little bit of child support she received from their English professor father. She also found it impossible to supervise them properly. They lived in a rough, drug infested neighborhood. Like many children who grow up that way, Andre decided that the best way to deal with his environment was to become physically strong and aggressive. The book will give the reader a look into the head of a somewhat violent teenager.

Dubus's writing is top notch. He captures the sights and smells and speech of the Merrimack Valley mill towns perfectly.
fabscf fabscf
I just reread this memoir and I still love it. It helps that I'm familiar with some of the locations he writes about, such as Newburyport and Haverhill but he describes what they were like decades before I ever encountered them. What I love is his metamorphosis into a bruiser, through body building and boxing lessons, which teach him to penetrate that "invisible membrane" around a person's face when you're punching him, and then into something of an angry monster, and then into a somewhat more enlightened person when it comes to conflict resolution. It also comes to terms with his ambivalent relationship with his celebrity author father and how he grew up isolated from educated society when his father left the family to fend for himself. A great read.
avanger avanger
In the 1960s, the young Dubus's started their lives together like many couples of the times. They were golden, with their intellect, their parties, and the life they were living. They were in love.

But marriage and parenting four children would take their toll, and with the divorce, the children would watch their father walking away, while they were left behind, as many children of divorce are. Their lives would be more impoverished because of the financial strains of living with a single mom. Oftentimes there was not enough food in the house, and sometimes during the long hours that their mother was at work, the kids had to fend for themselves. And what they found to occupy themselves was often something disruptive.

But nearby, the father, Andre Dubus, already a published author, would enjoy the writer's life, while teaching at a nearby college. He had many female companions, some of whom he married. And his time with his children felt like "dating" them, a description he shared with them.

As the oldest son and second child, young Andre would find that living in a series of poor mill towns in Massachusetts would be a kind of training ground for having to fight for what he wanted. And to stave off the bullying that seemed to follow him everywhere. But first he had to work out and develop the muscles he would need.

Much of the story in Townie: A Memoir reveals what that life was like for the young boy, and how he eventually came to change how he looked at fighting; how he eventually learned how to deal with that rage that arose in him. In this excerpt, he shows us what that felt like:

"Ever since I was a boy running from other boys, I'd been making myself into a man who did not flee, a man who planted his feet and waited for that moment when throwing a punch was the only thing to do, waited for that invisible membrane around me to fall away and I'd gather once again the nerve and will to shatter another's. But I had discovered a new membrane now. The one between what we think and what we see, between what we believe and what is."

But it would take many years for young Andre to arrive at this place...and then only after he began writing in his notebooks and channeling his feelings into his writing.

It would also be many years before father and son would develop a better relationship. Toward the end of the story, when Andre had just published the book House of Sand and Fog, the closeness between them would be stronger than ever.

The story was riveting, even though the earliest sections that dealt with the rage and fighting were difficult to get through. The rewards that came in the second half of the book made having to slog through the violence worth it. Recommended for those who relish writer's memoirs, and especially for those who have enjoyed other works by this author. Four stars.
Rose Of Winds Rose Of Winds
Details, details, details. I got 1/3 through and said to myself: How can anyone remember so many details from their youth. I seriously doubt that anyone could. More novel than Memoir from my perspective. After a while, the details got to be boring.
Browelali Browelali
As a man estranged from his father, I am inspired by this book to build a bridge.
Not knowing my dad as a man has left me not knowing me. As a violent man myself, I too have felt the awe of laying aside my animosity in order to embrace the stories of my enemies and to learn that they have always been me.
I can tell this is genuine because he knows his hands.
Mmsa Mmsa
This is the first time that I have read anything by this author, but found that it got bogged down in way too much detail. It started strong & was interesting, however about 3/4 into the book, I was asking ,"Who cares?" Who really needs those tidbits? I would not recommend this book.
Macill Macill
The best meditation on violence I have ever read. If you are a conscientious person and ever wonder what it feels like to be in a fight this is your book. It's an engrossing story of how the author came to understand violence love and family. Like Frank McCourt said "the happy childhood is hardly worth your while" this memoir is further proof of it. Dubus story is not one of sentimentality but a difficult life with an aloof artistic father who he yearns to earn the admiration of, a mother who is loving but overworked, siblings that have their own crosses to bare and the overwhelming weight of his bleak New England hometown. Smelling of cigarettes and Southern Comfort his teen and early twenties were as rough as the his suburb of Boston. Building up his muscles like armor, adorning to protect those he loves, and to assuage his feeling of impotence, Dubus makes himself into a fighter. But unlike other stories of street fighting there is no hint of braggadocio in this piece. He is not telling old war stories but trying to reverse engineer violence to understands pull and limitations. Dubus was a shy and nervous child who made himself fight in order to fill a void he felt in himself that was only later to be filled by writing. What was the void? That is not for me to answer but i will say that I'm glad that he did turn to writing because I truly love this book.