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eBook Walt Whitman: A Gay Life ePub

eBook Walt Whitman: A Gay Life ePub

by Gary Schmidgall

  • ISBN: 0452279208
  • Category: Arts and Literature
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Gary Schmidgall
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Plume (September 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 464
  • ePub book: 1884 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1638 kb
  • Other: txt mobi lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 923

Description

His book attempts to describe Whitman during different phases in his life, particularly important ones that would have shaped his gay identity.

His book attempts to describe Whitman during different phases in his life, particularly important ones that would have shaped his gay identity. Therefore, the focus is not broad across the span of Whitman's many years, but very intensely focused specific times, for example, Whitman as an opera lover. Schmidgall admits upfront the task before him which is enormous; being that in all of Whitman's known correspondances, interviews, archival evidence, details on his sexuality and sex life is scanity at best.

His other Whitman books are Walt Whitman: A Gay Life and Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892. His other Whitman books are Walt Whitman: A Gay Life and Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892

Walt Whitman a gay life. Walt Whitman a gay life. by. Schmidgall, Gary, 1945-.

Walt Whitman a gay life. Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892, Homosexuality and literature, Poets, American, Gay men. Publisher. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Francis Ong on September 7, 2010.

Walt Whitman: A Gay Life is the first biography to illuminate the vital . Walt Whitman: a gay life.

Walt Whitman: A Gay Life is the first biography to illuminate the vital connection between Whitman's life as a homosexual and his legacy as a landmark literary artist. Here is the story of his encounter with the young Oscar Wilde, one of the most intriguing meetings of minds in literary history. Gary Schmidgall is the author of The Stranger Wilde: Interpreting Oscar, which The Boston Globe called ?An astute study?genuinely original," and The San Francisco Chronicle noted "Breathes new life into the memory of Wilde. He lives in New York City. Kirjaluettelon tiedot.

Walt Whitman's place in . don't make this the only one you read, however

Walt Whitman's place in . letters is unchallenged: he is the poet of America, democracy, and individual freedom. don't make this the only one you read, however. that said, it does an amazing and passionate job that i think whitman would appreciate.

What would Walt Whitman have thought about that prize example of. .I'm pretty certain I know-not only from my experience writing Walt Whitman: A Gay Life, but also my experience as one of Uncle Sam's soldiers.

What would Walt Whitman have thought about that prize example of inside-the-Beltway folly "don't ask, don't tell"? I'm pretty certain I know-not only from my experience writing Walt Whitman: A Gay Life, but also my experience as one of Uncle Sam's soldiers.

Walt Whitman burst onto the literary stage raring for a fight with his transatlantic forebears. With the unmetered and unrhymed long lines of Leaves of Grass, he blithely forsook "the old models" declaring that "poems distilled from other poems will probably pass away. As Gary Schmidgall demonstrates, the American bard's manuscripts, letters, prose criticism, and private conversations all reveal that Whitman's negotiation with the literary "big fellows" across the Atlantic was much more nuanced and contradictory than might be supposed.

Whitman Making Books/Books Making Whitman (Iowa City: Obermann Center for .

Whitman Making Books/Books Making Whitman (Iowa City: Obermann Center for Advanced Studies, 2005). Folsom, Ed, and Kenneth M. Price. Whitman in His Own Time: A Biographical Chronicle of His Life, Drawn from Recollections, Memoirs, and Interviews by Friends and Associates (Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2000). PDF. Price, Kenneth M. To Walt Whitman, America (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004). Schmidgall, Gary, ed. Intimate with Walt: Selections from Whitman's Conversations with Horace Traubel, 1888–1892 (Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2001).

Semantic Scholar extracted view of "Schmidgall, Gary. Walt Whitman: A Gay Life " by Martin G. Murray. oceedings{GW, title {Schmidgall, Gary. Walt Whitman: A Gay Life }, author {Martin G. Murray}, year {1997} }. Martin G.

The core of Schmidgall's biography lies in the book's examination of Whitman's homosexuality and his love affairs. It was only in the mid-19th century that sodomy - as same-sex relations were called - began to be regarded not simply as a sexual act but as a temperament. Whitman was a vigorous adherent of this view, Schmidgall shows.

A revealing biography of the renowned American poet explores the relationships Whitman had with his male friends, most notably his long-time lover Peter Doyle, and uses such insight as a basis for literary criticism of his work. 10,000 first printing.

Comments

Modar Modar
One of the things that people often do is to take their heroes and try to see within that person themselves. It's only natural. It's through someone else's greatness that we experience it, and often, find our own. So it's not surprising that many Whitman biographers have passively denied Whitman's homosexuality, or out right refuted it. It's also not surprising that Gary Schmidgall takes a different view, and sees Whitman through the eyes of a gay man, writing an impressive, passioned look at Whitman's life called "Walt Whitman: A Gay Life".

Based on a look on Whitman's poetry, letters, and other sources, Schmidgall tells a tale of a gay Whitman. This isn't a biography, however, which Scmidgall admits right away. His book attempts to describe Whitman during different phases in his life, particularly important ones that would have shaped his gay identity. Therefore, the focus is not broad across the span of Whitman's many years, but very intensely focused specific times, for example, Whitman as an opera lover.

Schmidgall admits upfront the task before him which is enormous; being that in all of Whitman's known correspondances, interviews, archival evidence, details on his sexuality and sex life is scanity at best. We have no big true confessional, and when asked directly about the sexual content of "Leaves of Grass", his pat answer is to let the work speak for itself. However, Schmidgall does an awesome job reconstructing Whitman, looking at everything through the eyes of a gay man, bringing the poet alive much more than other biographies which I've read.Schmidgall liberally uses the words like "imagine, think, suppose" when talking about his points, but you forgive him. The task is daunting, but well done.

Whitman is alive in this book as he never has been before. Whereas more scholarly books fail to adequately persue Whitman's sexuality, this one brings it alive, and therefore, brings Whitman alive in a wonderful sense. You can almost hear the poet chuckling in the background as you read some of the passages. Whatever the effect, Whitman has been drawn closer to my heart because of this book, and I highly recommend it.
Hucama Hucama
Undoubtedly, the most amazing thing about the many Whitman bio's (and there's certainly no shortage of them), is their denial of his homosexuality. This is why Schmmidgall's work stands head and shoulders above them all (including Jerome Loving's seemingly exhaustive bio that doesn't present Whitman as being gay). The trouble with Loving and the rest who would deny Whitman's sexuality is that they are either terribly homophobic, or that they never read any of Whitman's poetry. The only reason I gave the book a three star rating, is because I don't feel it's a good first-Whitman-book to read for the uninitiated. Rather, I would start with his actual poetry, maybe read a popular bio, and then end up with Schmidgall's "Gay Life".
Ohatollia Ohatollia
In a world where historical figures as prominant and as influential as Walt Whitman are thought to be Homosexual, its very unfortunate for people who study Modern American literature like myself that "Historians" jump to outrageous conclusions, spurred on by desire for fame and a savage media, as in this book.

Didn't Walt Whitman want his readers to be captivated by his beautiful use of the English language and criticize events such as the American Civil War? These overprivalaged "hisorians" need not take out frustrations on such great men. The fist of Satan on America and the rest of the world is tightening, especially with the reelection of an international terrorist in November and our little "War on Terrorism" which enters its 4th year in September. What we need is a War on Poverty, a War on Ignorance, and a War on Men such as Bush who do an excellent job of speeding up the decline of the American Empire. "Bread and Circuses" and constant warfare with people like the Carthaginians in the Punic Wars contributed to the fall of the Roman Empire. I think America will go out in a classical style and fear that another Middle Ages will haunt generations which will come a few hundred years after this is published.

Mr. Schmidgall, I must applaud you for trying to bring Whitman to another generation but I personally think you might've taken the words of Ginsberg a little too seriously...