cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Darwin, His Daughter, and Human Evolution
eBook Darwin, His Daughter, and Human Evolution ePub

eBook Darwin, His Daughter, and Human Evolution ePub

by Randal Keynes

  • ISBN: 1573221929
  • Category: Arts and Literature
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Randal Keynes
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Riverhead Hardcover; 1st edition (January 7, 2002)
  • Pages: 384
  • ePub book: 1837 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1621 kb
  • Other: mobi doc lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 149

Description

A profoundly moving book. itself a work of genius.

A profoundly moving book. As Darwin's theories continue to shape so much of our thinking about the roots of human nature, Darwin, His Daughter, and Human Evolution reveals the personal experience from which he drew his most deeply held ideas.

Darwin, His Daughter, an. .has been added to your Cart. The Sunday Times (London). A brilliant accomplished history-itself a work of genius. Publishing News (UK).

Keynes pays particular attention to Darwin as husband and father Of all the children, Darwin doted most on Annie, his cherished, eldest daughter, who was the apple o.

Keynes pays particular attention to Darwin as husband and father. Darwin, who adored his family, exhibited "a fine degree of paternal fervour" with his ten children, playing on his hands and knees with them, never silencing their "howls and screams," and even allowing them into his study while he worked. Of all the children, Darwin doted most on Annie, his cherished, eldest daughter, who was the apple of her devoted father's eye. On April 22, 1851, just two days after Easter, Annie died, possibly from tuberculosis. Paradoxically, Darwin's religiosity suffered its.

In Darwin, His Daughter & Human Evolution, Keynes shows that Darwin was not "a cold intellect with no.The book also tells a great deal about family life in the 1800's. Darwin married his first cousin and they had 10 children.

In Darwin, His Daughter & Human Evolution, Keynes shows that Darwin was not "a cold intellect with no place for love in his famous 'struggle for existence,'. a man of uncommon warmth" (Scientific American).

In Darwin, His Daughter & Human Evolution, Keynes shows that Darwin was not "a cold intellect with no place for love in his .

In Darwin, His Daughter & Human Evolution, Keynes shows that Darwin was not "a cold intellect with no place for love in his famous 'struggle for existence, . What makes this book so moving and illuminating is the way Keynes tracks his subject's emotional development and, more generally, shows how much his scientific thinking was influenced by his wife Emma and their 10 children. besides its contribution to the intellectual history of Darwinism, Darwin, His Daughter & Human Evolution is a delightful portrayal of mid-19th century family life. -Financial Times (London). intriguing family portrait.

In Darwin, His Daughter & Human Evolution, Keynes shows that Darwin was not "a cold intellect with no place for love in his famous 'struggle for existence . Books related to Darwin, His Daughter, and Human Evolution.

Charles Darwin, His Daughter and Human Evolution, by Randal Keynes, Darwin’s.

Today, the Telegraph reported that film distributors, frightened of offending religious America, have decided that I will not be seeing Creation, the biopic of Charles Darwin based on the book Annie’s Box: Charles Darwin, His Daughter and Human Evolution, by Randal Keynes, Darwin’s.

In Darwin, His Daughter & Human Evolution, Keynes shows that Darwin was not "a cold intellect with no place for . In a chest of drawers bequeathed by his grandmother, author Randal Keynes discovered the writing case of Charles and Emma Darwin’s beloved daughter Annie Darwin, who died at the age of ten.

Similar books and articles. Darwin, His Daughter, and Human Evolution. Annie's Box: Charles Darwin, His Daughter and Human Evolution. Peter Skelton - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Science 37 (3):353-354. Darwin's Legacy What Evolution Means Today. Darwin's Black Box the Biochemical Challenge to Evolution. Michael J. Behe - 1998. Evolution and Medicine.

Drawn from never-before-published material, an intimate glimpse into the life of the man who changed the world's way of comprehending the origins of human nature, presented by his great-great grandson, tells the story of Darwin's home life, his inner turmoil, his wife Emma, a complex and independent woman, and his beloved daughter Annie, who died at the age of ten. 30,000 first printing.

Comments

Tygokasa Tygokasa
There is a book, and a poem, titled "There Are Men Too Gentle To Live Among Wolves" and this kept flashing through my head as I read this wonderful, illuminating portrait of a man almost too sensitive for his own good. He ADORED his wife and children, and when his little Annie died he almost did, too, of a broken heart. Probably because he was a scientist and therefore dealt pretty much with specifics, he was able to survive his disappointments and explore the most enlightening of subjects, the animal/human species. How lucky we are to be the beneficiaries of his life-long work.

This book, like "Darwin and his Dogs" before it, is another primer on Darwin. There is quite a bit of scientific detail, but never enough to become overwhelming and always tempered with his most human nature. Was Darwin a hypochondriac? Or did he suffer from ailments not classifiable or treatable at the time of his life? We will probably never have answers to those questions, but can only be grateful that he overcame them to an extent that he lived a rich, loving and rewarding life.

Charles Darwin is probably the most loving and lovable of all the so-called great men (and women) of history I have read about. He was also quite humble. We know a lot about him as a person because of the voluminous correspondence and diaries left behind by him and other members of his family and friends, both in and out of the scientific community. This is remarkable reading and I can't help but think that current, and most likely future, generations will not leave such auspicious information because the computer age (twittering and thumb-writing) does not contain detail or feeling of thought that written correspondence facilitates.

I loved this book. I cried when he suffered through Annie's last days, brave though she was. At the same time, I remain sufficiently interested in Darwin's work to search out yet more books by/about him and his large family. I have a stack of them and am anxious to continue my reading. I want to mention one in particular that I recently bought from my local bookstore: Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species: A Graphic Adapation by Micheal Keller, Illustrated by Nicolle Rager Fuller. The text and fabulous drawings make the subject even more knowable and interesting and I would recommend it to anyone who remains shy of scientific writings.
DART-SKRIMER DART-SKRIMER
I have read a lot of Darwin biographies and this is by far my favorite. The book is written by one of Darwin's descendants using some personal letters Darwin wrote during his daughter's fatal illness. I couldn't put this book down. As a parent myself I was captivated by his evident great love for his family. The account of his daughter's final days as told through the daily letters he wrote to his wife had me crying. This book takes you right into Darwin's heart and what a great heart it was. This book was later made into the movie Creation, and there were changes made that detract from the movie. The book is far better than the movie, as is usually the case. If you saw the movie and liked it, buy this book now. If you didn't care for the movie, buy this book now. If you've never seen the movie, buy this book now.
Usanner Usanner
I picked this up initially to add to the background info. I impart to my students about evolution. While there is some scientific information, it is more about Darwin the man. At a time when aristocratic parents in England rarely saw their children until they were adults, Darwin was an involved compassionate parent who documented all of his children's scientific milestones as well as daily anecdotes like their smiles or amusing remarks. I knew before I read it that several of his children had not lived to adulthood, but that did not stop me from tearing up when reading of his daughter Annie's death at the age of ten. He blamed himself for what he perceived as physical weakness in his children because his wife was, in fact, his first cousin. I came away with a new appreciation for a man I had always admired, but now revere as one of the greatest fathers who has ever lived as well as one of history's most notable scientists.
Amhirishes Amhirishes
This book is a great introduction to Charles Darwin, the human being.

So often we think of Darwin as a thinker, a philosopher, a scientist, a villain, a hero, and associate him only with the theory of evolution that we don't think at all about him as a real person. We never bother comtemplating who Darwin was or where he was coing from.

This book explores the life, lifestyle and personality of Charles Darwin and looks at the forces that shaped him and his writings. His love for his children, his grief over the loss of his beloved daughter from a painful chronic disease, his struggle with the idea of faith in God, his doubts about the meaning of life, all come together to introduce us to Darwin like no other books before has done.

Anyone at all interested in Charles Darwin, his writings or evolution must read this book. The reader will stop thinking of him as a caricature and start seeing him as a human man.

Superbly done!
Pooker Pooker
This is an insightful, up close and personal inside view of the Darwin family, a very human family with all the same conflicts, triumphs and tragic downs that befall the human family as it navigates the vicissitudes of life. Darwin himself is always a leader of a team whether domestic or scientific. He extends a compassion and wisdom that is both heart warming and enlightening,only available to view because an insider like Randal Keynes, the author and great great grandson of this magnanimous homosapien sapien is so gracious to share with the world. Darwin himself was too humble to put on airs, in fact, he was self deprecating at times,deeply concerned about the effect his theory would have on his fellow man.It's a story of a man torn in many ways,who doesn't really feel the triumph he created.This history book is a must for novice and scholar alike.