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eBook White Hand Society: The Psychedelic Partnership of Timothy Leary  Allen Ginsberg ePub

eBook White Hand Society: The Psychedelic Partnership of Timothy Leary Allen Ginsberg ePub

by Peter Conners

  • ISBN: 0872865355
  • Category: Arts and Literature
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Peter Conners
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: City Lights Publishers; First Edition edition (November 23, 2010)
  • Pages: 312
  • ePub book: 1373 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1903 kb
  • Other: lit doc docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 556

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Conners explains the Society, such as it was: Ginsberg introduces Leary, at the start of the Sixties, to the artists . Conners ends his book by summing up what Ginsberg worked on in 1997, during his final days: a long poem "Death & Fame.

Conners explains the Society, such as it was: Ginsberg introduces Leary, at the start of the Sixties, to the artists who can influence the Great Society. Leary exposes Ginsberg to "powerful hallucinatory visions. He wanted a "big funeral" where all who were touched by him and who touched his life could attend.

The result is a portrait of two remarkable figures who came together and changed our culture forever.

Электронная книга "White Hand Society: The Psychedelic Partnership of Timothy Leary & Allen Ginsberg", Peter Conners

Электронная книга "White Hand Society: The Psychedelic Partnership of Timothy Leary & Allen Ginsberg", Peter Conners. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "White Hand Society: The Psychedelic Partnership of Timothy Leary & Allen Ginsberg" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

White Hand Society book. Leary's life, and his fruitful collaboration with the poet Allen Ginsberg, has been illuminated in Peter Conners' recent study, White Hand Society: The Psychedelic Partnership of Timothy Leary and Allen Ginsberg, an engaging narrative which spans several decades, as well as the entire . with side trips to Europe and North Africa. Conners maps the trail of where Ginsberg’s paths intersected with Leary’s over three-hundred readable, well-paced, straightforward pages.

While individual biographies of Ginsberg and Leary have been published, their explicit ties have never . The strong response to the recent book The Harvard Psychedelic Club reveals a renewed interest in Timothy Leary's turbulent life.

While individual biographies of Ginsberg and Leary have been published, their explicit ties have never been explored (outside of FBI files). WHS goes a step beyond by looking at how Leary's Harvard experiments fomented an interest in psychedelics that swept across the country. Dil: İNGİLİZCE Kategori: Çeviren

The book’s title White Hand Society is taken from the name Timothy Leary initially called his circle of drinking friends at Harvard

The book’s title White Hand Society is taken from the name Timothy Leary initially called his circle of drinking friends at Harvard. It is a measure of both the man and the prevailing climate that he should choose to name his groups (indeed, his psychedelic group post-Harvard went through a whole series of titles, which Conners tell us he meticulously kept new headed stationary fo. By doing this Leary was able to transform a loose collection of individuals into a more potent and coherent cultural force

White Hand Society - Peter Conners.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The result is a portrait of two remarkable figures who came together and changed our culture forever. White Hand Society - Peter Conners.

Conners, Peter (2010). White Hand Society - The Psychedelic Partnership of Timothy Leary and Allen Ginsberg. p. 148. ISBN 9780872865358. Melechi, Antonio (1997). Psychedelia Britannica. pp. 89, 90. ISBN 1873262051.

In 1960 Timothy Leary was not yet famous — or infamous — and Allen Ginsberg was both. Leary, eager to expand his experiments at the Harvard Psilocybin Project to include accomplished artists and writers, knew that Ginsberg held the key to bohemia's elite. Ginsberg, fresh from his first experience with hallucinogenic mushrooms in Mexico, was eager to promote the spiritual possibilities of psychedelic use. Thus, "America's most conspicuous beatnik" was recruited as Ambassador of Psilocybin under the auspices of an Ivy League professor, and together they launched the psychedelic revolution and turned on the hippie generation.

White Hand Society weaves a fascinating and entertaining tale of the life, times and friendship of these two larger-than-life figures and the incredible impact their relationship had on America. Peter Conners has gathered hundreds of pages of letters, documents, studies, FBI files, and other primary resources that shed new light on their relationship, and a veritable who's who of artists and cultural figures appear along the way, including Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, Thelonious Monk, Willem de Kooning, and Barney Rosset. The story of the "psychedelic partnership" of two of the most famous, charismatic and controversial members of America's counterculture brings together a multitude of major figures from politics, the arts, and the intersection of intellectual life and outlaw culture in a way that sheds new light on the dawn of the 1960s.

"Through the years City Lights has brought us seminal work by Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, and now, this detail-rich double bio of Allen Ginsberg and Timothy Leary. I knew both these men pretty well, and the times intimately, and Peter Conners has been true to it all. I don't know how he amassed the trunks of data he must have used to find the jillions of details which were new to me, but I'm certainly glad that he did. This book wins a well deserved spot on my shelf, and belongs with anyone who wants an intimate view of the Sixties-Seventies spinning of the Great Wheel of the Dharma." —Peter Coyote, actor/author, Sleeping Where I Fall

"Peter Conners has given us a wondrous tale of picaresque adventure and authentic friendship – between Leary the trickster-explorer-scientist and Ginsberg the activist-bard-philosopher, two seminal figures who pioneered new pathways through the cultural maelstrom of the sixties."—Ralph Metzner, co-author, with Ram Dass & Gary Bravo, of Birth of a Psychedelic Culture

"The Psychedelic Revolution of the Sixties began with the meeting of two visionary explorers into the unmapped regions of inner consciousness — Timothy Leary and Allen Ginsberg. In the White Hand Society Peter Conners charts the course from the earliest dirt roads of laughing gas to the superhighways of LSD in one compelling story. It is a thrilling ride on what Ginsberg called the Trackless Transit System, going where no one else had dared venture. Take this as a new kind of guidebook into the mystery of the mind." —Bill Morgan, author of Beat Atlas: A State by State Guide to the Beat Generation in America and The Typewriter Is Holy: The Complete, Uncensored History of the Beat Generation

"Peter Conners' White Hand Society is a gripping account of a key event in 20th Century history, the decision to actively promote strong psychedelics to the population at large. Conners tells the Timothy Leary story from the traditional perspective of the West Coast counterculture, but he emphasizes the egalitarian influence that the Beat movement had on him and, in particular, the huge Blakean personality of Allen Ginsberg. The result is a portrait of two remarkable figures who came together and changed our culture forever." —John Higgs

Comments

Djang Djang
makes you want the 60s again
Zololmaran Zololmaran
Well written and places all the history of the sixties hippie movement in great chronological order. Refreshed my memory of an exciting and important time of my life.
OCARO OCARO
The title refers to a drinking club of two Timothy Leary started at Harvard, around 1960. It never amounted to much, but Peter Conners uses it for his book, which links Leary to Allen Ginsberg over the decades, from the Beats to the Hippies, and into the Watergate era, the War on Drugs, and the final days of both countercultural pioneers. Their partnership is not an unfamiliar story.

What Conners contributes that is fresh are his excerpts and summations from the Ginsberg archives of his correspondence at Stanford; added to the referenced material from Barry Miles' and Bill Morgan's published research on the poet, Conners maps the trail of where Ginsberg's paths intersected with Leary's over three-hundred readable, well-paced, straightforward pages. While Conners does not credit Michael Schumacher's 1994 Dharma Lion biography, which focused on the poetry itself, his use of Miles and Morgan among others, along with a reliance on Robert Greenfield's excellent 2006 biography (see my review) of Leary, makes for a welcome overview for those seekers who may not wish to tackle those hefty volumes in their quest to find out about what linked, and sometimes divided, these two visionary pranksters.

Conners explains the Society, such as it was: Ginsberg introduces Leary, at the start of the Sixties, to the artists who can influence the Great Society. Leary exposes Ginsberg to "powerful hallucinatory visions." By making psilocybin and mescaline respectable, under Harvard's sponsorship, Leary sought to break out of academia while using his position within it to, at least not yet, drop out. First, he wanted America's elite to tune in and turn on.

Leary dominates most of the ensuing saga. As a "nirvana salesman," his entrepreneurial skills and charlatan flair enabled him, for example, to go AWOL from the Ivy League to hang out in Hollywood on behalf of his front group for psychedelic experimentation, The International Foundation for Internal Freedom. He crafted and timed his failure to show up for the end of the spring semester of 1963 so as to make it seem as if Harvard fired him "for taking and advocating the use of psychedelics." With such publicity, Leary launched his movement.

As Ginsberg represented the activist, Berkeley, politically radical contingent, Leary spoke for Haight-Ashbery's psychedelic flower-children, the pacifists and resisters to conformity, or to revolution. As the following month's "Houseboat Summit" on Alan Watts' boat in the San Francisco Bay documents in an appendix, how to drop out and from where, as Ginsberg and Gary Snyder challenged Leary, remained the practical problem. Leary insists that a portion of society will be able to withdraw from the straights, analogous to a day off every seven days in our work week, and that the world can survive. Ginsberg wonders how the engineers and astronomers will pass on their knowledge and skills to those who leave the universities for the prairies and woods.

Subsequently, after prison twice over, Algerian exile with an uneasy Black Panthers stay under Eldridge Cleaver, if told in a too compressed a form by Conners, Leary worked with the FBI and DEA in exchange for release from a second term in California's penitentiary when he was recaptured after uneasy passages with shady minders, via Geneva and Kabul. By the 1980s, Ginsberg eased into the role of elder statesman to the non-territorial tribe he helped shepherd. Despite the War on Drugs and the Reagan years, both men wind up their lives with a degree of grace.

Leary "with a puckish twinkle in his eye and the rumpled demeanor of a pleasantly stoned Classics professor," for his keep turned to debating Liddy on the road. Space travel occupied his interests in the 1980s. His ashes, after his death in 1997, joined those of Star Trek's creator Gene Roddenberry to circle the earth aboard Spain's first satellite, for two to ten years in orbit.

Ginsberg lamented that government research on "human mind engineering" had, except for a few military projects, been stopped, and he mourned the control of heroin by the mafia and police. He too lectured on the college circuit, continued to advise LSD use "for an intelligent kid," and stood to the left of the mainstream--even if the mainstream had moved closer towards him over the past generation. While less confrontational, his stands on homosexuality, spirituality, and ecological issues, as Connor reflects, had been adopted by millions since he had first expressed them publicly. As a Buddhist and in more genteel fashion, he spoke in 1987 of not challenging the neurotic and incompetent anymore so much as trying to enrich those who needed inspiration and guidance.

While Leary may have gained more notoriety, and may have been unable to shake his need to stay in the spotlight as an agent and a provocateur, one closes this dual biography convinced that Ginsberg may prove the more lasting contributor to personal freedom and social liberation. Conners ends his book by summing up what Ginsberg worked on in 1997, during his final days: a long poem "Death & Fame." He wanted a "big funeral" where all who were touched by him and who touched his life could attend. Conners concludes: "Allen's list in `Death & Fame' is long, but nowhere near comprehensive. That would have been impossible."
Rleyistr Rleyistr
I love the way this book starts (and the way it reads throughout!). I had known about Ginsberg's Blakean vision and really appreciate Conners' perceptive ideas about it as a triggering mechanism for Ginsberg's lifelong investigation of other-worldly possibilities through tuning in and turning on to various hallucinogenic and meditation practices.

My connection to Leary has always been more to his notoriety, good and bad, as a leader in the psychedelic movement. Even at the time, his making any sense as a social scientist or thinker came and went for me, and I was then, and remain, skeptical of a number of his notions. Sometimes he was strong, sometimes very weak and his antics didn't help the movement. The inclusion of the Houseboat Summit, especially with our hindsight perspective, often shows him to be out of touch altogether (it's a wonderful showcase for the good souls of Allen and Gary Snyder as they come to his rescue or re-direct the conversation).

But, I must also say, the opening Leary chapter helps my understanding and provides clues to what motivated his passionate pursuit of the LSD experience. A number of other moments along the way also show Leary's humanity, and at times his human desperation, in a positive light.

This was quite an era and for someone who lived through it and was at least somewhat "tuned in" it was great to re-live it and to learn more about how it all went down. While the book is thorough it is hardly a textbooky historical account. It is smoothly organized and, its biggest plus, Conners has written it with a flair for storytelling that will keep you turning his pages!
Onnell Onnell
This is one of the best books I have read about Ginsberg and Leary. Written without sensationalism, it chronicles the times beautifully. As one influenced greatly by both men, I was more than pleased to read such a balanced rendering, something not easy to do given their shared notoriety.

Poetry and trickery.

Courageous psychonauts I salute you in the world beyond, and I bless the author for a sensitive portrayal, warts and all, of the dreams you lived.

Sex and Light: How to Google your way to Godhood
Wymefw Wymefw
Some Americans have attempted to turn me into a highly medicated individual, so I find ironic links to the MK Ultra project when intellectual activity is associated with drugs by those who hope the world will save itself by becoming normal. As a student at the same universities where the Unabomber obtained his degrees, I knew someone who went to a talk on: Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out. Young people who do not want to take part in a society that has so many laws against personal behavior can study what goes on in the brains of people who are up on something, but the misfits who find themselves playing with supernatural powers when going to the moon was supposed to make sense can confuse how much of our past is still in the future. Anything I could say would be outrageous because the people in this book became the stereotype for antiestablishment thinking.