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eBook Captain Cook: Obession and betrayal in the New World ePub

eBook Captain Cook: Obession and betrayal in the New World ePub

by Vanessa Collingridge

  • ISBN: 0091879132
  • Category: Deliver toandnbsp;Russian Federation
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Vanessa Collingridge
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ebury; 1st Edition edition (2002)
  • Pages: 376
  • ePub book: 1273 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1750 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf mbr mobi
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 794

Description

Vanessa Collingridge's Captain Cook is a prime example of the unstoppable rise of this self-obsessed genre. Vanessa Collingridge says she had always been drawn to James Cook. But what interested her was the flawed "man behind the myth". We’ll tell you what’s true.

Vanessa Collingridge's Captain Cook is a prime example of the unstoppable rise of this self-obsessed genre where we should have been separated by geography, history and place in society, our stories were now fused into one". James" is the 18th-century explorer; "George" is George Collingridge, a 19th-century obsessive who set out to prove that Cook did not discover Australia.

He stakes his reputation on the claim and loses it; his life is ruined by obsession. She discovers the name of a distant cousin, George Collingridge, in a dusty card index. Thus a new journey of discovery begins - in the footsteps of her hero and his nemesis. The result is this biography which tells how passion and betrayal unite two men across 100 years and 10,000 miles.

Collingridge, Vanessa. Please feel free to contact Berry Books for any information you require. You will get a prompt reply.

Cook: Obsession and Betrayal in the New World (2002), Ebury Press . Video clip of Collingridge describing her biography of James Cook (RealPlayer video). Captain Cook: Obsession and Discovery.

Cook: Obsession and Betrayal in the New World (2002), Ebury Press, ISBN 0-09-187913-2. "The captain and the deflater", Sara Wheeler, The Spectator, 9 March 2002. ., Boudica (2005), Ebury Press, ISBN 0-09-189819-6. Archived 20 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine Film Australia, 2007. "Weather girl and now author Vanessa Collingridge at home in Lochwinnoch" Archived 27 September 2007 at the Wayback Machine, Stephenpics.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Presents the story encompassing three separate centuries and three different lives. Captain Cook is best known for his heroic voyages through the Pacific Ocean. This work starts with his humble beginnings as the son of a farm labourer to his final tragic voyage which signalled the end of his revered reputation.

She had known of Cook's achievements since schooldays, but her imagination wasn't properly captured until in adulthood. As she stood before a museum display she became aware of Cook's journey from lowly beginnings to mighty achievements, and the tragedy that marked his life, with three of his six children dying in early childhood.

Vanessa Collingridge's Cook biography is entitled 'Captain Cook: Obsession and Betrayal in the New World'. BBC Timewatch - Captain Cook: The Man Behind the Legend. Shackleton Exhibition. He stayed in touch with his companions from the ‘Endurance’ days, Greenstreet and Bakewell in particular.

Vanessa Collingridge is an author and broadcaster Cook: Obsession and Betrayal in the New World (2002), Ebury Press, ISBN . World Heritage Encyclopedia is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.

Vanessa Collingridge is an author and broadcaster. She is the youngest of five children born and raised in Woking in Surrey, England. Her father Gordon was half-Irish and her mother Irene half-Scottish. Cook: Obsession and Betrayal in the New World (2002), Ebury Press, ISBN 0-09-187913-2. Boudica (2005), Ebury Press, ISBN 0-09-189819-6.

But, the interweaving of Cook, her distant relative George Collingridge, and her own journey to tell the two . So I went to Barnes and Noble store with my mom and sister and saw this on one of the new books table in the front of the store.

But, the interweaving of Cook, her distant relative George Collingridge, and her own journey to tell the two tales, was wonderful. I very much enjoyed the book and her journey. I wish that she had added more of her personal reflections than she did. I studied history in college, and I taught history in middle school. Miss Collingbridge is James Cook's distant cousin, and George Collingbridge's neice or cousin I forgot what which it was. The book was about how their lifes became almost the same not everything about (sorry for my grammar).

Captain Cook was a man making two journeys, one public and one personal, and their success and ultimate cataclysmic failure are intertwined. By the time he "discovered" Australia, the mythology around Cook had set fast. Its strength endured the fractures of an unheroic descent and violent death. Almost 100 years later another man catches a boat to Australia. Like Cook, George Collingridge, aristocrat and artist, is seeking adventure - and like Cook, it proved to be his undoing. His journey leads him to old maps of early explorers, secret tales of hidden lands and buried treasure. It leads him to the real discoverers of Australia - the Portuguese. He stakes his reputation on the claim and loses it; his life is ruined by obsession. A hundred years later, Vanessa Collingridge is searching for books on her hero Captain Cook in a university library. She discovers the name of a distant cousin, George Collingridge, in a dusty card index. Thus a new journey of discovery begins - in the footsteps of her hero and his nemesis. The result is this biography which tells how passion and betrayal unite two men across 100 years and 10,000 miles. It sets Captain Cook, hero of conflicting myths, in the context of his times, his personality, his guiding philosophy and his extraordinary legacy.

Comments

X-MEN X-MEN
"The story of the three of us - James, George and me... where we should have been separated by geography, history and place in society, our stories were now fused into one". Oh dear, this reader thought, one of those books where the author is the reason and core of the story. But this work is better than that, and is not even a "light" history as it closely follows the captains own official journals and offers a very readable interpretation of Cook's journeys of discovery and meticulous navigation.
Because of previous readings, of the original journals, much of the history was familiar, indeed even the interposing of the Collingridge name with Cook was familiar ground, as several other writers and biographers mention the connection. Tony Horwitz covered much the same material in his account of a similar search for the man in Blue Latitudes[...]
Minor complaints... this is a rather `breathless' narrative. Not that it is in the style of "scribblin' wimmin", but in the overuse of the word. When I visit my cardiologist he always asks "Any breathlessness?" If he asked Vanessa she should, in truth, have to reply; "Only every third paragraph or so". Everything takes her breath away or leaves us, she claims, breathless. And the author remains seemingly convinced that "Pickled Cabbage", or even "Salted Cabbage" is somehow different to Sauerkraut. I seem to recall her using at least two versions of this famous antiscorbutic in the same sentence!
However, the author has produced a solid, well researched, history and a good book on this remarkable man, and any author sharing an illustrious name and engaged in a work that provides a connection between the book's subject and that name could scarcely resist providing a strong reference.
Nightscar Nightscar
An interesting book about the discoveries of Australia before Cook, Cook's work, his family life and the relationships he had with the people on board.
Danskyleyn Danskyleyn
This book is really a combination of 2 biographies of a) Captain Cook (1728-1779) and b) George Collingridge (1847-1931)
Captain Cook was sea captain,explorer and naturalist who has been credited with the discovery of Australia during the first of his 3 voyages in 1770 while George Collingridge (an ancestor of the author) was a historian and naturalist who claimed the discovery of Australia was made by the Portuguese in the 16th century.
Both lives are cleverly interwoven by the author to make a fascinating story.Well written and researched.
Frosha Frosha
This book began well, but in the end, I found it annoying and hard to finish. Its strong qualities rely more on the enduring fascination of its topic - Cook and his voyages - than to the quality of the re-telling.

The story of George Collingridge's struggle to establish the true discoverer(s) of Australia is interesting, but belongs in a single chapter near the end, or in a separate book altogether. Interweaving it with Cook's story seems contrived, and is often distracting.

Similarly, Vanessa Collingridge has what this reader found to be an annoying habit of interjecting her own reactions and experiences into the narrative (how poorly prepared she was for the hike down to the beach where Cook was killed) which seems intrusive and irrelevant.

Small inaccuracies creep into the text (London was not gas lit in Cook's time; the first public gas lights were installed in the first decade of the following century), which make one uneasy with the accuracy of the "larger" fact.

Cook's story and his tragedy are endlessly fascinating. This book gives the reader an adequate view of the great man's life, but there are other biographies which are better focused, more detailed, quite probably more accurate, and certainly less cluttered.
Pedar Pedar
When I was a boy I read a book entitled A Short History of the Civil War by Fletcher Pratt. It was full of inaccuracies, part truths, overblown quotes, not what a "real historian" would have approved of. But it stirred the mind of a pre-teen and left me wanting to know more. OK, so Ms Collingridge's facts are not dry enough for real historians, and maybe she adds some dramatic license to the tale. But, the interweaving of Cook, her distant relative George Collingridge, and her own journey to tell the two tales, was wonderful. I very much enjoyed the book and her journey. I wish that she had added more of her personal reflections than she did. I studied history in college, and I taught history in middle school. History needs facts, but it also needs drama so that people are interested in learning. This book had both.