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eBook Blood-Dark Track: A Family History ePub

eBook Blood-Dark Track: A Family History ePub

by Joseph O'Neill

  • ISBN: 1862072884
  • Category: Ethnic and National
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Joseph O'Neill
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Granta Books (October 10, 2001)
  • Pages: 338
  • ePub book: 1693 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1263 kb
  • Other: txt lrf mbr azw
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 118

Description

Joseph O’Neill writes beautifully. The fascination of this book lies in watching him come to terms with the violence in his family’s past

Joseph O’Neill writes beautifully. The fascination of this book lies in watching him come to terms with the violence in his family’s past. Daily Mail (London) The book has certainly worked hard to earn the reconciliation it finally imagines. It is too honest to get what it hopes for; too uncertain to know for sure what it is that has to be reconciled or forgiven.

Blood-Dark Track is a superbly composed double-narrativ. n. .Joseph O’Neill writes beautifully. An exploration into his secretive family histor. akes compulsive reading’. n extraordinary piece of detective work, removing the veil of silence that had been drawn across a history of the two branches of his family, and of the turbulent and often violent times in which O’Neill and Dakad lived’. A gripping detective story, a thoughtful enquiry into nationalism, and a moving evocation of world war at the edges of its European theatre’. The fascination of this book lies in watching him come to terms with the violence in his family’s past’.

Blood-Dark Track - Joseph O’Neill

Blood-Dark Track - Joseph O’Neill. For me it began in far-off Mesopotamia now called Iraq, that land of Biblical names and history, of vast deserts and date groves, scorching suns and hot winds, the land of Babylon, Baghdad and the Garden of Eden, where the rushing Euphrates and the mighty Tigris converge and flow down into the Persian Gulf.

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From the bestselling and PEN/Faulkner Award-winning author of Netherland, a fascinating, personal, and beautifully crafted family history. From the bestselling and PEN/Faulkner Award-winning author of "Netherland," a fascinating, personal, and beautifully crafted family history. Joseph O'Neill's grandfathers-one Turkish, one Irish-were both imprisoned for suspected subversion during the Second World War. The Irish grandfather, a handsome rogue from a family of small farmers, was an active member of the IRA.

JOSEPH O'NEILL has written an unusual memoir. Published in Britain in 2000 and recently released in paperback in America, "Blood-Dark Track: A Family History" is about his grandfathers, one Irish, one Turkish, who both went to jail for suspected subversion during the second world war. Though this is a story of spycraft and family secrets, Mr O'Neill's reminiscences bear a closer resemblance to the unhurried musing of Nabokov's "Speak, Memory" than the headlong rush of, say, Mary Karr's own best-selling purges.

A fascinating family memoir from Joseph O'Neill, author of the Man Booker Prize longlisted and Richard & Judy pick, ‘Netherland’. Joseph O'Neill's grandfathers – one Irish, one Turkish – were both imprisoned during the Second World War. The Irish grandfather, a handsome rogue from a family of small farmers, was an active member of the IRA and was interned with hundreds of his comrades.

Joseph O'Neill was born in Cork, Ireland, on 23 February 1964

Joseph O'Neill was born in Cork, Ireland, on 23 February 1964 O'Neill's parents moved around much in O'Neill's youth: O'Neill spent time in Mozambique as a toddler and in Turkey until the age of four, and he also lived in Iran. From the age of six, O'Neill lived in the Netherlands, where he attended the Lycée français de La Haye and the British School in the Netherlands. He is also the author of a collection of short stories, Good Trouble (2018) and a non-fiction book, Blood-Dark Track: A Family History, which was a New York Times Notable Book for 2002 and a book of the year for the Economist and the Irish Times.

Download books for free. Blood-Dark Track: A Family History.

The author chronicles the duel imprisonment of both his grandfathers during World War II--his Irish grandfather, an IRA fighter, and his Turkish grandfather, a British hotelier imprisoned in Palestine as suspected Axis spy.

Comments

Zulurr Zulurr
I loved many, many parts of this book. It is extremely well-written and thoughtful and interesting to a fault (kept me up late some nights) and I would have given it five stars at the halfway mark. However, it is simply 25 to 30% too long and would have benefited greatly from some judicious editing, particularly toward the end of the book. This is not just a complaint about length -- the political musings become ramblings and then become pedantic meanderings toward the end and all the great philosophical "at last I have found the meaning of life" screeds get tiresome very quickly. Author takes what are really coincidences about the lives of two of his two grandfathers and tries to read too much meaning to them. I would still enthusiastically recommend that you buy and read this book, just start skimming in the back half when he gets too tendentious, and you will enjoy it greatly.
Vizil Vizil
This is not a book that you would stumble across. I picked it up because I loved "Netherland" by the same author. And, I found the same attention to detail in this book that I was so attracted to in "Netherland".

O'Neill is a great writer with an almost unbelievable command of English. In this book, he tries to " find himself" through finding his grandfathers, one Irish, one Turkish/Syrian. What a combination! The action takes place mostly during the Second World War in Ireland and Turkey, although we get a good lesson in history before that time--- not didactic, just interesting.

Ostensibly, O'Neill wants to know how both men came to be incarcerated during the war. As criminals! Were they spies? Yes and No.

We get wonderful, unique descriptions of the countryside. Wonderful descriptions of the men and their families. And, we get philosophy. We do not get a hagiographic viewpoint. This, in itself, is a feat in a work like this.

Enjoy O'Neill's writing; you'll find it worth your time.
Tygolar Tygolar
An interesting story although the author takes forever to tell it. His style of writing kept me engaged. He writes with style and grace. There is a great deal of information about Ireland and the Middle East that has relevance to current affairs.
Delaath Delaath
This is a brilliant book. The author searches for the reasons why his two grandfathers - one Irish, one Turkish - both ended up in prison during the Second World War. His Turkish grandfather, Joseph Dakad, was interned by the British in Palestine on suspicion of spying for the Germans. His Irish grandfather, Jim O'Neill, was interned by his own government in the Curragh as a member of the IRA. By subtly intercutting the two stories, the book looks at nationalism in two very different contexts - the polyglot post-Ottoman culture of Turkey in the years between the two world wars, and the hidden story of Irish republicanism between De Valera coming to power and the resumption of The Troubles in 1966. In searching for the reasons why these two very different men were interned, O'Neill illuminates the unspoken ideas of nationalism and individuality that permeate (like DNA)the two sides of his family. While he sifts through British intelligence reports on "undesirable" activity in Jerusalem, and discovers who really murdered Admiral Somerville in West Cork in 1936, O'Neill's book is shot through with contemporary echoes of his grandfathers' ordeals. As the author watches Bernadette Sands reject the Good Friday Agreement in the name of Ireland's republican martyrs, and questions Yitzhak Shamir about the morality of political assassination, we realise that the ghosts of these men still haunt today's headlines, and our ancestors can assume the power of an unconscious force over our political reflexes.
Bolanim Bolanim
"Blood Dark Track" provides a fascinating background into the history of both Ireland and Turkey during the first half of the Twentieth Century. These two very disparate regions actually have more in common than we would initially suppose: neutrality during WWII, an antipathy to British Imperialism, persecution of religious minorities, and layers upon layers of history underlying bloody Twentieth Century history.
These areas also combine in the persona of the author, Joseph O'Neill, who has provided an intriguing personal narrative of his own family. His father's side, Catholic, poor, and Republican from Cork; his mother's, Catholic, bourgeois, and apolitical from Mersin (a coastal city near Syria). Their meeting is as fortuitous as it was unlikely.
The author deftly melds the pieces into a coherent whole, despite geographic, cultural, and temporal distances. Because of the personal connection of the author to events, people, and places, it reads more like a novel than a history.
Informing the story is the author's discovery of his grandfathers, both as family and as characters in two distinct, though subtly parallel, historical contexts. I was surprised to find the story so gripping that I finished it in three days.