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eBook Ja No Man: Growing Up White In Apartheid Era South Africa ePub

eBook Ja No Man: Growing Up White In Apartheid Era South Africa ePub

by Richard Poplak

  • ISBN: 0143050443
  • Category: Ethnic and National
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Richard Poplak
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Canada (March 6, 2007)
  • Pages: 342
  • ePub book: 1704 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1994 kb
  • Other: azw lit lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 742

Description

he slowly builds up through his personal story and indictment of apartheid. he is correct - it destroyed the moral fabric of all, and it helped decay a potentially marvellous generation. it is still remarkable that south africa gave rise to a. generation of liberation heroes - remarkable men - despite apartheid. Mandela, Sisulu, Tambo, Hani, Chief Luthuli and the like

Start by marking Ja, No, Man: Growing Up White in Apartheid-Era South Africa as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Ja, No, Man articulates what it was like to live through Apartheid as a white, Jewish boy in suburban Johannesburg. Told with extraordinary humour and self-awareness, Richard’s story brings his gradual understanding of the difference between his country and the rest of the world vividly to life.

Ja No Man: Growing Up White In Apartheid-Era South Africa. Boet, said Kevin, there’s a jazz somewhere down by the assembly hall where okes can do what they smaak, and I hear from reliable sources that it’s lekker down there. Like most children of the 1970s and 1980s, Richard Poplak grew up obsessed with pop culture. Watching The Cosby Show, listening to Guns N’Roses, and quoting lines from Mad Max movies were part of his everyday life.

Ja No Man. Growing Up White In Apartheid Era South Africa. But in Richard’s country, South Africa, censorship in the newspapers, military training at school, and different rules for different races were also just a part of everyday life

Ja No Man. Category: Biography & Memoir. But in Richard’s country, South Africa, censorship in the newspapers, military training at school, and different rules for different races were also just a part of everyday life. It was, as Richard says, a different kind of normal.

Richard Poplak is the author of the acclaimed Ja, No, Man: Growing Up White in Apartheid-era South Africa and The Sheikh's Batmobile: In Pursuit of American Pop Culture in the Muslim World

Richard Poplak is the author of the acclaimed Ja, No, Man: Growing Up White in Apartheid-era South Africa and The Sheikh's Batmobile: In Pursuit of American Pop Culture in the Muslim World. He has written for, among others, The Walrus, THIS Magazine, Toronto Life, and The Globe & Mail and has directed numerous short films, music videos and commercials. He lives in Toronto, Ontario.

She explained that South Africa was her home, and that was where .

She explained that South Africa was her home, and that was where Mandela came from. As a child, I couldn't comprehend her stories about South Africa and Mandela's bravery-my mother's home seemed like a myth-but as I grew older, I began to understand her stories. Although as a white woman my mother was barred from visiting the townships where the government forced blacks to live, she broke the law to visit her friend Carmen. Eventually, she immigrated from South Africa to America, because she thought the country was on the verge of collapse. VICE: What was it like to know that Apartheid existed while you were in South Africa?

Ja, No, Man articulates what it was like to live through Apartheid as a white, Jewish boy in suburban Johannesburg.

Ja, No, Man articulates what it was like to live through Apartheid as a white, Jewish boy in suburban Johannesburg. A startlingly original memoir that veers sharply from the quotidian to the bizarre and back again, Ja, No, Man is an enlightening, darkly hilarious, and, at times, disturbing read. Format Paperback 321 pages. Dimensions 139 x 208 x 18mm 367g.

he slowly builds up through his personal story and indictment of apartheid

he slowly builds up through his personal story and indictment of apartheid.

Richard Poplak was born and lives in Johannesburg, South Africa

Richard Poplak was born and lives in Johannesburg, South Africa. He trained as a filmmaker and fine artist at Montreals Concordia University and has produced and directed numerous short films, music videos and commercials. His first book was the highly acclaimed Ja, No, Man: Growing Up White in Apartheid-Era South Africa (Penguin, 2007); his follow-up was entitled The Sheikhs Batmobile: In Pursuit of American Pop-Culture in the Muslim World (Soft Skull, 2010). Poplak has also written the experimental journalistic graphic novel Kenk: A Graphic Portrait (Pop Sandbox, 2010).

"Boet,"said Kevin, "there’s a jazz somewhere down by the assembly hall where okes can do what they smaak, and I hear from reliable sources that it’s lekker down there."

Like most children of the 1970s and 1980s, Richard Poplak grew up obsessed with pop culture. Watching The Cosby Show, listening to Guns N’Roses, and quoting lines from Mad Max movies were part of his everyday life. But in Richard’s country, South Africa, censorship in the newspapers, military training at school, and different rules for different races were also just a part of everyday life. It was, as Richard says, "a different kind of normal."

Ja, No, Man articulates what it was like to live through Apartheid as a white, Jewish boy in suburban Johannesburg. Told with extraordinary humour and self-awareness, Richard’s story brings his gradual understanding of the difference between his country and the rest of the world vividly to life. A startlingly original memoir that veers sharply from the quotidian to the bizarre and back again, Ja, No, Man is an enlightening, darkly hilarious, and, at times, disturbing read.