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eBook Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's Last Hero ePub

eBook Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's Last Hero ePub

by David Maraniss

  • ISBN: 0743552156
  • Category: Ethnic and National
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: David Maraniss
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Abridged edition (April 25, 2006)
  • ePub book: 1653 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1955 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf docx txt
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 307

Description

Easily the best baseball book of this year. This biography offers Clemente as a model for the international future of baseball and a hope for the future of the game. Patrick Willard, The Tennessean.

Easily the best baseball book of this year. It took a writer of David Maraniss’s ability to cut through the haze of legend and make Clemente human again. Maraniss writes deftly and does. In David Maraniss, the great right fielder of the Pittsburgh Pirates has a worthy biographer, and Clemente is the best baseball book of 2006 so far. -Bruce Dancis, The Sacramento Bee. Brilliant.

David Maraniss now brings the great baseball player brilliantly back to life in Clemente: The Passion and Grace of. .The Clemente that Maraniss evokes was an idiosyncratic character who, unlike so many modern athletes, insisted that his responsibilities extended beyond the playing field.

David Maraniss now brings the great baseball player brilliantly back to life in Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's Last Hero, a book destined to become a modern classic. Much like his acclaimed biography of Vince Lombardi, When Pride Still Mattered, Maraniss uses his narrative sweep and meticulous detail to capture the myth and a real man. Anyone who saw Clemente, as he played with a beautiful fury, will never forget him. He was a work of art in a game too often defined by statistics.

David Maraniss now brings the great baseball player brilliantly back to life in "Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's On New Year's Eve 1972, following eighteen magnificent seasons in the major leagues, Roberto Clemente died a hero's death, killed in a plane crash as he attempted to deliver food and medical supplies to Nicaragua after a devastating earthquake.

Since 1971, Major League Baseball has recognized a player who best exemplifies the game of baseball, sportsmanship, community involvement and the . There is the Clemente as a Hall of Fame-worthy ballplayer narrative

Since 1971, Major League Baseball has recognized a player who best exemplifies the game of baseball, sportsmanship, community involvement and the individual’s contribution to his team. In 1973, that award was renamed to honor the memory of Roberto Clemente. Few writers could do justice to the legend of Roberto Clemente. David Maraniss is one of those writers and he penned a wonderful biography of Mr. Clemente. There is the Clemente as a Hall of Fame-worthy ballplayer narrative. There is the ubiquitous story of race relations in America from the mid-1950’s to 1972, as experienced by Clemente, a Puerto Rican-born professional athlete.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Pulitzer Prize winner David Maraniss’s brilliant rendering of the life of one of baseball’s most iconic figures captures both myth and man in daunting sweep and meticulous detail. On New Year’s Eve 1972, beloved Pittsburgh Pirate Roberto Clemente died a hero’s death, killed in a plane crash while attempting to deliver food and medical supplies to Nicaragua after a devastating earthquake.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 385-387) and index. On New Year's Eve, 1972, following eighteen magnificent seasons in the major leagues, Roberto Clemente died a hero's death, killed in a plane crash as he attempted to deliver supplies to Nicaragua after an earthquake. Journalist Maraniss now brings the great baseball player back to life. Anyone who saw Clemente play will never forget him-he was a work of art in a game too often defined by statistics. But Clemente was that rare athlete who rose above sports to become a symbol of larger themes.

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Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's .

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's Last Hero" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Among his bestselling books are biographies of Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, Roberto Clemente, and Vince Lombardi, and a trilogy about the 1960s-Rome 1960; Once in a Great City (winner of the RFK Book Prize); and They Marched into Sunlight (winner of the J. Anthony Lucas Prize and Pulitzer Finalist in History).

A narrative account of the life of the Puerto Rican baseball star traces his impoverished childhood, victories during the 1960 and 1970 World Series games, humanitarian contributions, and ongoing legacy for Latino major league players. Simultaneous.

Comments

Sarin Sarin
Since 1971, Major League Baseball has recognized a player who best exemplifies the game of baseball, sportsmanship, community involvement and the individual’s contribution to his team. In 1973, that award was renamed to honor the memory of Roberto Clemente.

Few writers could do justice to the legend of Roberto Clemente. David Maraniss is one of those writers and he penned a wonderful biography of Mr. Clemente. Published in 2006, Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball’s Last Hero, is four books for the price of one.

There is the Clemente as a Hall of Fame-worthy ballplayer narrative. There is the ubiquitous story of race relations in America from the mid-1950’s to 1972, as experienced by Clemente, a Puerto Rican-born professional athlete. There is the personal portrait of Clemente as a husband, father, teammate, humanitarian and, depending upon your perspective, either an athlete obsessed with his physical status or a hypochondriac. And, finally, there is the tragic story of Clemente’s last day, citizen of the world coming to the aid of Nicaraguan earthquake victims.

Clemente had few peers as a Major League outfielder, but those peers either played in much larger markets (Willie Mays, Duke Snider and Mickey Mantle played for New York teams) or had a statistical advantage in the categories that mattered most to casual fans and sportswriters (Henry Aaron and Frank Robinson). His team, the Pittsburgh Pirates, finished in the middle of the pack most seasons, although they did win two World Series titles during Clemente’s tenure.

In the mid-1950’s, Jim Crow was still in force in Fort Myers, Florida, the spring training home of the Pittsburgh Pirates. Clemente, and the other African-American and Latino players, had to eat and sleep apart from their white teammates. As Wendell Smith, an influential black sportswriter, wrote in the Chicago American newspaper: “…the vicious system of racial segregation in Florida’s hick towns condemns you to a life of humiliation and ostracism…You cannot live with your teammates. You cannot eat the type of food that your athletic body requires. You cannot get a cab in the mornings to take you to the ball park, unless it happens to be Negro-driven…”

Clemente would return to Puerto Rico after each MLB season where he would play on or manage a Winter League team. He would become an inspiration and role model for the next generation of Caribbean ballplayers, including Manny Mota and Matty Alou.

Maraniss’ literary genius is on full display in the writing of the final four chapters of the book. Non-baseball issues – a devastating earthquake in a faraway land, aviation regulations ignored, the underworld of tramp airplanes and pilots for hire, an ambitious relief effort undertaken – shape Clemente’s last hours. In the aftermath of the plane crash that claimed Clemente's life, Maraniss wrote, with great poignancy: “…at the end, after his people by the thousands lined the Atlantic shore in expectation that Clemente would walk out of the sea…finally, on a coral reef a mile east of Punta Maldonado, they found one sock, and Vera knew it was Roberto’s. One sock, that’s all, the rest to sharks and gods.”
Daron Daron
I still recall where I was (family living room) and who I was with (my Dad) when we heard the news of Roberto Clemente's tragic death. As a pre-teen boy, at the time all I knew of Clemente was his batting average and his bullet arm. Then, as details trickled out concerning the events surrounding his death--his mission of mercy to people in need, I learn more and more about Clemente the man.

Maraniss does a superb job telling both a baseball story and a biography. He also deftly balances the many remarkable traits of the man, with the few flaws he, like every human being, had.

If you love baseball history, you'll love "Clemente." If you love a "poor boy makes good" story, you'll love "Clemente."

Reviewer: Bob Kellemen, Ph.D., is the author of "Beyond the Suffering: Embracing the Legacy of African American Soul Care and Spiritual Direction," "Soul Physicians," "Spiritual Friends," and the forthcoming "Sacred Friendships: Listening to the Voices of Women Soul Care-Givers and Spiritual Directors."
heart of sky heart of sky
David Maraniss' account of The Great Roberto's life on and off the diamond is captivating. His black, chiseled good looks won him approving glances from women, black and white in Latin and North America. His unquestioned talent in baseball won--grudgingly--the admiration of sprtswriters near and far to Forbes Field.
I was eleven when Clemente was called drafted from Brooklyn's farm club in Montreal in 1954The Dodgers buzzy Bavasi tried to hide him in Canada. To no avail. The '54 Pirates finished a dismal last place in the NL, and they had first dibs on The Great One and never hesitated. It took a couple years for him to reach greatness--1960, to be exact--when he had an MVP year only to finish 8th in the voting to an overrated Pirate SS named Dick Groat. Until that year his numbers were only so-so. His number of oufield putouts was noteworthy but, on the downside, so were his throwing errors. And for good reason: He had a rifle for an arm!
In the late 50's and early 60's when a friend and I began to attend Pirates' games on a semi-regular regular basis. we'd make it a point to go early enuf to watch the Bucs take batting practice then funge practice where a pirates' coach would use a very heavy bat to hit fly balls to the outfielders, one of whom was Clemente in right. I remember stil the thrill and scintillation of Clemente rifling a throw to the plate or to third base, not on two hops; not one one hop' but a strike. More often than not not, he'd duplicate it in a ballgame to the point that NL base runners no longer risked testing his arm.
Then came the famous --or infamous--World Series of 1960. Clemente was the only Pirate to hit safely in all seven games and batted .314 People who follow MLB know the ninth inning shot off the bat of Bill Mazeroski that ended in a Pirates' victory, their first series crown since 1925 As Bob Prince, the Pirates' play-by-play announcer, would've said--if he'd still be in the TV booth "How sweet it is!"
Just one more thing. David Maraniss committed one unforced error in his account. It was on page 115 when recounting Game Two of the '60 World Series. He stated the great Yogi Berra was starting in left field for the first time in his storied career. Not quite. Yogi started in left in GameOne for the Yanks. How can I be sure? Because I was there! My high school chum and I had seats in the left field bleachers, and there 75 yards away wBerra playing a mid-deep left field for Pittsburgh's slugger, Dick Sturart. Almost in unison the Bleacher Bums sang out, "Move back, Yogi! Yogi, move back!" He didn't budge. And for good reason: The Yankees had the book on Stuart. 3 for 20 in The Series, all singles and no RBIs It broke my hear because, next to Clemente, Stuart was my favorite. It was truly a fairy tale finish to an extraordinary pennant run by the Buccos.
Joni_Dep Joni_Dep
The intricacies of Roberto Clemente’s baseball career and life are too often overshadowed by his superb achievements and tragedy. This narrative fleshes out the passionate man and highlights his determined pursuit for social equality, and recognition for his contribution to the teams he played on. He could be blunt and frustrated, yet he felt people didn’t pay enough attention to what he did well. He was generous and had incredible hopes to enrich the lives of others by making sport evenly accessible. Clemente was a fine athlete and a remarkable human being.

Nicholas R.W. Henning – Australian Baseball Author