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eBook Girocho: A GI's Story of Bataan and Beyond ePub

eBook Girocho: A GI's Story of Bataan and Beyond ePub

by Marlin Young,John Henry Poncio

  • ISBN: 0807128511
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Marlin Young,John Henry Poncio
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: LSU Press; First Edition edition (May 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 327
  • ePub book: 1705 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1352 kb
  • Other: lrf azw lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 467

Description

by Marlin Young and John Henry Poncio. After surviving the brutal Bataan Death March in spring 1942, Louisiana native John Henry Poncio spent the remainder of World War II as a Japanese prisoner, first at Camp Cabanatuan in the Philippines and later at Hirohata in Japan.

by Marlin Young and John Henry Poncio. In those three and a half years, . Army Air Corps sergeant Poncio suffered severe beatings, starvation, disease, and emotional and psychological abuse at the hands of his captors.

Start by marking Girocho: A GI's Story of Bataan and Beyond as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. war effort, their friends, and their very lives.

John Henry Poncio Marlin Young1 may 2003. John Henry Poncio (1918-1998) continued to serve in the in the . Air Force from 1945 to 1953. Their book is a fitting tribute to the POWs in the Pacific, who fought in their unique way for the . Following his military career he worked as deputy tax assessor for St. Mary Parish in Morgan City, Louisiana

Girocho is an inspiring memoir, transcribed verbatim by Poncio’s wife, Inez, from nine hours of cassettes Poncio .

war effort, their friends, and their very lives.

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A Gi's Story of Bataan and Beyond. by John Henry Poncio, Marlin Young. Published June 2003 by Louisiana State University Press. For weeks, a dreary, smoky shroud had hung over our Japanese prison camp, blotting out the sun and doing nothing to alleviate the all-pervading, gloomy atmosphere.

Book DescriptionAfter surviving the brutal Bataan Death March in Spring 1942, Louisiana native John Henry Poncio spent the remainder of World War II as a Japanese prisoner. In Girocho, he relates his experiences with touching honesty, vividly describing the harsh conditions he and his comrades endured as well as the sometimes-funny clashes with Japanese culture.

Books written by Louisiana affiliated authors and published during the past year include . Kelleher Schafer, Associate Director of Murphy Institute of Political Economy at Tulane University; A Perfect War of Politics: Parties, Politicians, and Democracy in Louisiana, 1824-1861 by John Sacher, LSU PhD-history; Girocho: A GI’s Story of Bataan and Beyond by Louisiana native John Henry Poncio and his niece Marlin Young; Falling Up: How a Redneck Helped Invent Political Consulting by Raymond.

Published by: Louisiana State University Press

Published by: Louisiana State University Press. However, his resiliency, sense of humor, and cunning helped him to persist and to recover from the traumatic events without rancor toward the Japanese.

After surviving the brutal Bataan Death March in spring 1942, Louisiana native John Henry Poncio spent the remainder of World War II as a Japanese prisoner, first at Camp Cabanatuan in the Philippines and later at Hirohata in Japan. In those three and a half years, U.S. Army Air Corps sergeant Poncio suffered severe beatings, starvation, disease, and emotional and psychological abuse at the hands of his captors. However, his resiliency, sense of humor, and cunning helped him to persist and to recover from the traumatic events without rancor toward the Japanese. In Girocho, he relates his experiences as a POW with touching honesty, vividly describing the harsh conditions he and his comrades endured as well as the sometimes-funny clashes with Japanese culture.

Girocho was a samurai who stole from the rich and gave to the poor, a Japanese Robin Hood. Early on, Poncio was given this name in jest by one of the prison guards, and it suited him perfectly. During his internment, he took part in a vast smuggling operation that brought food, money, mail, and other supplies into the POW camps; he reported enemy troop movements to Filipino guerrillas and participated in acts of sabotage. He and the other prisoners worked together incessantly to subvert the Japanese war effort even under the threat of death, going so far as to bury expensive calibration equipment in wet cement and build irregular gears for planes. To frustrate their captors and to stay alive, the American POWs developed the technique “going Asiatic” ― maintaining a blank expression during interrogations and beatings and escaping mentally for a time. Although he and his fellow captives were treated with cruelty by many, Poncio recalls the camaraderie of the prisoners and encounters with humane guards and kind civilians, proving his remarkable gift for finding the positive in the most dire of situations.

Girocho is an inspiring memoir, transcribed verbatim by Poncio’s wife, Inez, from nine hours of cassettes Poncio recorded some years after the war. Marlin Young verified her uncle’s stories, placed them in chronological order, and set them within the greater context of the war, creating a compelling tale of one soldier’s courage, honor, and resolve to overcome life as a prisoner of war. Their book is a fitting tribute to the POWs in the Pacific, who fought in their unique way for the U.S. war effort, their friends, and their very lives.

Comments

Gaua Gaua
I am just half-way through the book and this is a story that should be told to as many people and spread as widely as possible. A debt that could never be repaid goes to the late Mr. John Henry Poncio for enduring the extreme hardships and brutality he was subjected to under the Imperial Japanese forces in the Philippines and Japan as an American POW. His fighting spirit and strong will to survive are displayed throughout the book. The inhumane treatment of American POWs by the enemy at the time is gut wrenching and tragic; it should never be forgotten. Although you can get a sense of the sentiment at the time it is clear that this story was told by a man who had the capacity to forgive so many years later and it gives one hope about humanity's capacity for good.

Mr. Poncio was from my hometown and this is a bit of history I had grown up not knowing and I wish I had the opportunity to meet him and honor him for his service and great sacrifice that we can only read about and hopefully never have to endure. This story provides a greater appreciation for human life, mercy and forgiveness. Thank you Mr. John Henry Poncio for sharing this story and for his family for putting it into print for us to remember. Thank you to all of the men and women who served their country during WWII along with those who made the ultimate sacrifice. We will never forget!
Eta Eta
Poncio's story from Bataan to Hirohata, written with total context of the war. An outstanding and complete story.
Every so often, one discovers a "POW" book that is not only accurate, but well written. Each line, each paragraph, each page weaves a complete tapestry of a Prisoner's life under the Japanese. Add to this, one sees beautifully crafted typography that makes this a classic. Of the more than 1000 books w have on the subject, this book ranks in the top ten.
Poncio adds depth and meaning to the history of our POWS, especially the guerilla and public support by foreign nationals and Filipinos. His is one of the rare books that even acknowledges the support from the legendary Madame Utinsky, a heroine who deserved the Medal of Honor. No phase of the experience is slighted nor any detail ignored as the writers weave a tapestry of horror endured yet an inspiring and unending battle to survive and sabotage the Japanese war effort. Poncio's description of desperate hunger alone is worth the price of the book. On a scale of one to five stars, Poncio's book deserves seven extra large stars.
Center for Research
Allied POWS Under the Japanese
Ginaun Ginaun
Girocho: A Gi's Story of Bataan and Beyond

I had a special interest because John Henry Poncio is/was a relative, but even more because he bore no enmity for the Japanese. That still amazes me. The story of what our troops endured should be required reading in our schools.