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eBook Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens ePub

eBook Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens ePub

by Jane Dunn

  • ISBN: 0375708200
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Jane Dunn
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage (January 25, 2005)
  • Pages: 480
  • ePub book: 1496 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1171 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi doc txt
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 726

Description

Dunn demythologizes Elizabeth and Mary Elizabeth & Mary takes the queens from birth until Elizabeth's 1588 defeat of the Spanish Armada the year after Mary’s beheading and fifteen years before Elizabeth’s death.

Dunn demythologizes Elizabeth and Mary. In humanizing their dynamic and shifting relationship, Dunn describes it as fueled by both rivalry and their natural solidarity as women in an overwhlemingly masculine world. Elizabeth & Mary takes the queens from birth until Elizabeth's 1588 defeat of the Spanish Armada the year after Mary’s beheading and fifteen years before Elizabeth’s death. It’s a fascinating, stirring, and poignant story that’s well told in this book.

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In a rich and riveting narrative, Jane Dunn reveals the extraordinary rivalry between the regal cousins. By placing their dynamic and ever-changing relationship at the center of the book, Dunn illuminates their differences. It is the story of two queens ruling on one island, each with a claim to the throne of England, each embodying dramatically opposing qualities of character, ideals of womanliness (and views of sexuality) and divinely ordained kingship.

Queen Elizabeth I of England and Mary, Queen of Scots were two of the greatest, most legendary . Mary’s sense of herself as queen had been with her from the dawning of her consciousness, biographer Jane Dunn writes in Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens

Queen Elizabeth I of England and Mary, Queen of Scots were two of the greatest, most legendary rivals in recorded history-although they never even met. In one castle was Elizabeth, the childless virgin queen: bawdy, brilliant, tactical and cynical. In the other, Mary: feminine, charming, romantic and reckless. Mary’s sense of herself as queen had been with her from the dawning of her consciousness, biographer Jane Dunn writes in Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens. It was never disputed or tested, as was Elizabeth’s.

Distinguished biographer Jane Dunn reveals an extraordinary story of two queens ruling in one isle, both embodying opposing qualities of character, ideals of womanliness and of divinely ordained kingship. Theirs is a drama of sex and power, recklessness, ambition and political intrigue, with a rivalry that could only be resolved by death

Электронная книга "Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens", Jane Dunn

Электронная книга "Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens", Jane Dunn. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

While Elizabeth, exiled from safety, protection and power, endured her baptism of fire, her cousin Mary was embarking on. .

While Elizabeth, exiled from safety, protection and power, endured her baptism of fire, her cousin Mary was embarking on her own more literal exile with a cheerful heart. Her mother, Mary of Guise, had got her way at last: her daughter was to be taken to safety, contracted to marry the dauphin to become eventually Queen of France. The marriage treaty was signed on July 7 1548 and with it the alliance with France was strengthened. Mary hoped that now the French would give her much-needed aid in her struggles to protect her daughter’s kingdom from the English.

Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots had always been aware of each other, of their kinship and relations to the English crown

Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots had always been aware of each other, of their kinship and relations to the English crown. As cousins, they were both descended from Henry VII, Elizabeth as his grand-daughter and Mary as his great grand-daughter. As subject of the English succession loomed again, Elizabeth was acutely conscious of the strength of the Queen of Scot’s claim to the English throne

"Superb.... A perceptive, suspenseful account." --The New York Times Book Review"Dunn demythologizes Elizabeth and Mary. In humanizing their dynamic and shifting relationship, Dunn describes it as fueled by both rivalry and their natural solidarity as women in an overwhelmingly masculine world." --Boston HeraldThe political and religious conflicts between Queen Elizabeth I and the doomed Mary, Queen of Scots, have for centuries captured our imagination and inspired memorable dramas played out on stage, screen, and in opera. But few books have brought to life more vividly the exquisite texture of two women’s rivalry, spurred on by the ambitions and machinations of the forceful men who surrounded them. The drama has terrific resonance even now as women continue to struggle in their bid for executive power. Against the backdrop of sixteenth-century England, Scotland, and France, Dunn paints portraits of a pair of protagonists whose formidable strengths were placed in relentless opposition. Protestant Elizabeth, the bastard daughter of Anne Boleyn, whose legitimacy had to be vouchsafed by legal means, glowed with executive ability and a visionary energy as bright as her red hair. Mary, the Catholic successor whom England’s rivals wished to see on the throne, was charming, feminine, and deeply persuasive. That two such women, queens in their own right, should have been contemporaries and neighbours sets in motion a joint biography of rare spark and page-turning power.

Comments

Gabar Gabar
Impartial to both rulers, I find this book terribly one sided...much in favor of Elizabeth while essentially chastising Mary through repetetive points of describing Mary's sexual appetite and ineptness even though the next lines and paragraphs have nothing to do with the description.
Reddefender Reddefender
First, I would like to review the book itself, and then address some of its critics.

Two of history's most famous queens, one for her unexpected and remarkable greatness, the other for her inexplicably poor judgment and bad luck. But was their famous rivalry inevitable? Was Elizabeth always the popular, talented, dominant one while Mary remained in her shadow? Jane Dunn asks these questions, and I was surprised - and pleased - by some of her answers.

The first part of the book is essentially a point-by-point comparison of the two queens, detailing their very different youths and explaining how they would influence the women in later years. Essentially, Mary had a huge sense of entitlement, was overconfident in her own power and security, and was a much more 'traditional' woman - and Queen - of her day. Elizabeth, whose childhood was punctuated by dramatic changes of fortune, had a much more acute sense of how tenuous her position was, and how much she depended on the good will of her people to maintain power.

Dunn does beat the Mary-as-charming-but-spoiled and Bess-as-brilliant-control-freak comparison into us a bit, but it is a good way of looking at the very different natures of these two women. Her book isn't a full biography of either queen; rather it's a look at the intersection between them - their relationship with each other, their competition, rivalry, and common causes. As such it's a fascinating look at a unique time in European history, the so-called "Age of Queens".
Posterity-wise, Mary got the short end of the stick. History will always remember her as Elizabeth's paler shadow, a major annoyance and minor queen who had no one but herself to blame for her tragic end. Although Dunn does occasionally (perhaps unavoidably) slip into Mary-bashing and Bess-worship, on the whole she does a good job pointing out that that wasn't always the case - and, had a few things gone differently, we would paint a very different portrait of the two cousins. Her Mary and Elizabeth are fully human - flaws, quirks, charms, and all. It's the best way to explain the convoluted relationship between the two, and it provides a lot of useful character insight into all other aspects of these Queens as well. (I do wish Dunn had gone further into the possibility that Mary was bipolar. It's a fascinating hypothesis, and it would explain a lot.)

Mary's end - which also serves as the book's - is too rushed; twenty years are covered in a handful of pages and the account of the execution itself offers nothing new. But until that point, I thoroughly enjoyed this provocative and inspiring portrait of two very different women whom circumstances thrust into such fierce competition.

Now: Some reviewers seem to feel that Dunn was somehow "unfair" to Mary and that her comparison of the two queens is misogynist. I admit to being completely baffled by this point of view. It appears to stem from the argument that somehow Mary was a better "feminist" queen than Elizabeth, I suppose because Elizabeth "betrayed the sisterhood" by having Mary executed.

Further, Dunn's critics seem to argue that Mary was a better "feminine" role model than Elizabeth was, apparently because she ruled through emotion rather than reason. They complain that Elizabeth is too "cold" and "calculating" to be a good example of a female ruler, while waxing rhapsodic about Mary's "mercy" and "gentleness". Let me be blunt: this is the sort of idiotic, feel-good, p.c. claptrap that has set the cause of working women back 50 years. Yes, there is something to be said for women's differing management styles; you will get no argument from me that in today's world, women should not have to emulate uber-masculinity to succeed. But - newsflash! - this was the 16th century. Not only were the roles of men and women completely different - and thus incomparable - than they are today, have you ever actually tried to get anything done with the kind of dithering, vapid leadership exemplified by Mary and her ilk?

Attempting to repaint Dunn's dual biography as some sort of feminist management manifesto does a disservice, both to the author and her subjects. We should admire both Elizabeth and Mary for who they were and what they did, while admitting their flaws and shortcomings. But this is not the 1500s, and trying to appropriate their story to make a point about women today is grossly misrepresentative, self-centered, and intellectually careless. If you want to adopt antiquated delusions about women in the workplace, try reading Forbes online - not "Elizabeth and Mary".
HelloBoB:D HelloBoB:D
When I first ordered this book for a history class I teach in the spring, I was uneasy. Having not yet read the book, I thought it would probably be a back and forth of Elizabeth did this, Mary did that, etc. Nothing could be further from the truth and I am in awe of Jane Dunn's writing skills, which make for an exciting read. Although this book is over 400 pages long and in fairly small print, I read it in less than four days. Even though she is not a historian, Dunn has outdone many in this extraordinary account of two queens and the times in which they lived. It is biography, history, the story of a time and several countries, all written in a vivid and highly readable fashion. And unlike many so-called historians, Dunn has provided endnotes. As an author and historian myself, I deplore the recent trends toward very general "histories" or biographies that have no notes and sometimes no bibliography. Although those books usually do not make original claims, it is impossible to check any of their facts or look into a particular subject further without consulting additional sources.

As a history professor and author myself, I found no historical errors, though there were a couple of omissions and one question of interpretation. Although Elizabeth did not "want to make windows into men's souls" as long as they worshipped 'appropriately' and Mary's Catholicism was central to her identity, it would have helped to at least mention the Elizabethan Settlement of 1571. This came only a year after the pope finally excommunicated Elizabeth, allowing her Catholic subjects and other powers to rise up against her. It is important to note that it was Philip II of Spain who had forestalled the excommunication until 1570 (albeit entirely for his own purposes), allowing Elizabeth to consolidate power after her succession to the throne in 1558. The same reasons accounts for why the Armada did not attack England until after Mary's execution by Elizabeth in 1587 -- he wanted the throne for Spain, not Mary. My question of interpretation has to do with the courtship of Elizabeth and Alençon. Dunn seems to accept it at face value, an aging woman desiring the attentions of a younger man. Certainly her much later infatuation with Essex does not make this impossible, but most scholars believe it was yet another piece of her unmatched marital diplomacy. Alençon was so much younger and Elizabeth beyond childbearing, so there was never any question that Parliament would not allow the marriage. That of course enraged Elizabeth but, not in my view, because she was in love with him. She simply did not get her way.

Some have written that Dunn repeats her main themes about the two queens throughout, but I disagree. In any such book, the main ideas will recur at times, but I did not find an agenda in this book -- neither exalting Elizabeth nor condemning Mary out of hand. Although I have never believed Mary had any political acumen or much personal wisdom, I ended up with greater sympathy (and some admiration) for her than I had earlier had. The relationship between the two queens was complicated, and got more so over time so a 'one size fits all' argument would not have worked.

I do hope Dunn will consider writing a sequel. She ends with the Armada, though only briefly. Elizabeth still had fifteen years to live, and in Dunn's hands, that would be make another superb book.