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eBook Torn Out by the Roots: The Recollections of a Former Communist ePub

eBook Torn Out by the Roots: The Recollections of a Former Communist ePub

by Paul Schach,Hilda Vitzthum

  • ISBN: 0803246609
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Paul Schach,Hilda Vitzthum
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press; 1St Edition edition (March 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 273
  • ePub book: 1405 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1499 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi mbr docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 542

Description

Even though Hilda was an Austrian and, like her husband, a loyal Communist, her children were taken from her and she was condemned to forced labor

Even though Hilda was an Austrian and, like her husband, a loyal Communist, her children were taken from her and she was condemned to forced labor. Torn Out by the Roots is Hilda Vitzthum's chilling reminiscence of her nearly ten years in Soviet labor camps-of privations and horrors of overwhelming enormity, mitigated by occasional kindness and humanity. It is a harrowing and moving story, all the more so for its simplicity and matter-of-factness. Although Hilda Vitzthum was allowed to return to Austria in 1948, she could not write about her experiences until the 1980s

Personal Name: Vitzthum, Hilda, 1902-. Publication, Distribution, et. Lincoln ISBN: 0160655498 Publication & Distribution: Washington. Congressional Sales Office, (c)2001

Personal Name: Vitzthum, Hilda, 1902-. Congressional Sales Office, (c)2001. The philosophy of the middle way : Nagarjuna ; introduction, Sanskrit text, English translation, and annotation, David J. Kalupahana. by Na?ga?rjuna ; introduction, Sanskrit text, English translation, and annotation, David J. ISBN: 0887061486 Author: Na?ga?rjuna, 2nd cent.

Even though Hilda was an Austrian and, like her husband, a loyal Communist, her children were taken from her and she . The enemies of the people must be torn out by the roots," read a sign Hilda Vitzthum observed in a public building shortly before her arrest in 1938.

Even though Hilda was an Austrian and, like her husband, a loyal Communist, her children were taken from her and she was condemned to forced labor. Torn Out by the Roots is Hilda Vitzthum?s chilling reminiscence of her nearly ten years in Soviet labor camps?of privations and horrors of overwhelming enormity, mitigated by occasional kindness and humanity.

The enemies of the people must be torn out by the roots," read a sign Hilda Vitzthum observed in a public building .

The enemies of the people must be torn out by the roots," read a sign Hilda Vitzthum observed in a public building shortly before her arrest in 1938. Her husband, a Russian engineer employed in the construction of a huge steelworks in western Siberia, was an "enemy of the people," a member of the educated classes that Stalin saw as a threat to his regime. Not only would h "The enemies of the people must be torn out by the roots," read a sign Hilda Vitzthum observed in a public building shortly before her arrest in 1938.

Schach Paul (1). Vitzthum Hilda (1). Subjects. 0. Torn out by the roots : the recollections of a former Communist, ISBN: 0803246609. University of Nebraska Press

Schach Paul (1). Women Communists (1). Women Political Prisoners (1). English Türkçe. University of Nebraska Press, 1993. Term: Full phrase Any word. Results 1 - 10 of 1 records. NEAR EAST UNIVERSITY GRAND LIBRARY +90 (392) 223 64 64 Ext:5536. Not only would he be a victim of Stalin’s madness; his whole family must be destroyed.

Torn out by the roots : (Vitzthum, Hilda. Additional related names. Bibliographical information (record 205742). Torn out by the roots : Subtitle: the recollections of a former Communist /. Author: Vitzthum, Hilda. Publisher: University of Nebraska Press, ISBN: 0803246609.

1). POLITICAL SCIENCE - Political Process - Political Parties. Torn out by the roots : the recollections of a former Communist. Vitzthum, Hilda, 1902-. 1). Political prisoners. Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. 1. by.

A year after the incident, I was still trying to figure out who the mystery man was, although I was sure by this time it wasn't Oswald. What disturbed me more, though, was the way Slim had taken such pains to try to alarm me about Barbara Reid's gossiping

A year after the incident, I was still trying to figure out who the mystery man was, although I was sure by this time it wasn't Oswald. What disturbed me more, though, was the way Slim had taken such pains to try to alarm me about Barbara Reid's gossiping. Slim Brooks made no pretense of believing Barbara's story. Why, then, did he seem to enjoy needling me about it? When the night of my lecture at the Quorum arrived, I noted with slight feelings of relief that Brother-in-law was not in the audience.

Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser (/ˈdraɪsər, -zər/; August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945) was an American novelist and journalist of the naturalist school

Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser (/ˈdraɪsər, -zər/; August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945) was an American novelist and journalist of the naturalist school. His novels often featured main characters who succeeded at their objectives despite a lack of a firm moral code, and literary situations that more closely resemble studies of nature than tales of choice and agency. Dreiser's best known novels include Sister Carrie (1900) and An American Tragedy (1925).

"The enemies of the people must be torn out by the roots," read a sign Hilda Vitzthum observed in a public building shortly before her arrest in 1938. Her husband, a Russian engineer employed in the construction of a huge steelworks in western Siberia, was an "enemy of the people," a member of the educated classes that Stalin saw as a threat to his regime. Not only would he be a victim of Stalin’s madness; his whole family must be destroyed. Even though Hilda was an Austrian and, like her husband, a loyal Communist, her children were taken from her and she was condemned to forced labor.

Torn Out by the Roots is Hilda Vitzthum’s chilling reminiscence of her nearly ten years in Soviet labor camps—of privations and horrors of overwhelming enormity, mitigated by occasional kindness and humanity. It is a harrowing and moving story, all the more so for its simplicity and matter-of-factness.

Although Hilda Vitzthum was allowed to return to Austria in 1948, she could not write about her experiences until the 1980s. Before then, she says, "no one would have believed me if I had told the unvarnished truth." The dissolution of the Soviet Union compels us to record, so none may forget, the human cost of the Stalinist experiment.