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eBook Princess Victoria Melita ePub

eBook Princess Victoria Melita ePub

by John Van der Kiste

  • ISBN: 0750934697
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: John Van der Kiste
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sutton Publishing (February 25, 2004)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1549 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1877 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi rtf lit
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 359

Description

John Van der Kiste, Princess Victoria Melita, Sutton Publishing, 1991, p. 1. Sullivan, p. 115. ^ John Curtis Perry and Constantine Pleshakov, The Flight of the Romanovs, Basic Books, 1999, p. 83.

John Van der Kiste, Princess Victoria Melita, Sutton Publishing, 1991, p. 15. ^ a b Sullivan, p. 37. ^ Sullivan, p. 56. 38. ^ Van der Kiste, p. 14. ^ Sullivan, pp. 80-82. Sullivan, pp. 87-88. 93, 114. 113.

John van der Kiste's biography, Princess Victoria Melita, tells the story of the bride at the wedding. He starts with the story of her parents, the second son of the Queen, Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, and her mother, the only daughter of Tsar Alexander II, Marie Alexandrovna. The marriage was certainly an odd one, and Marie did not settle in well with her English in laws. I had been hard-pressed to find any books exclusively about this second daughter of Victoria and Albert's second son (Alfred) and his illustrious wife, the former Grand Duchess Marie of Russia. If you are not hooked on history, you will be after you are finished with this very informative, well-written book.

Princess Victoria Melita - John Van der Kiste.

Princess Victoria Melita played a colourful role from her birth in 1876. The second daughter of Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, she made a brief and unhappy marriage at the age of 17 to her cousin, Ernest, Grand Duke of Hesse. In the face of strong opposition from her family she divorced him seven years later and married another cousin, Grand Duke Cyril of Russia, resulting in three years of exile. Princess Victoria Melita - John Van der Kiste.

Princess Victoria Melita book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Princess Victoria Melita as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This is a fascinating portrait of the Princess and how she.

John Van der Kiste (born 15 September 1954 in Wendover, Buckinghamshire) is a British author, son of Wing Commander Guy Van der Kiste (1912–99). The second daughter of Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, she made a brief and unhappy marriage at the age of 17 to her cousin, Ernest, Grand Duke of Hesse

Princess Victoria Melita played a colourful role from her birth in 1876. Using previously unpublished correspondence from the Royal Archives and Astor papers, this is a portrait of the Princess, set against the imperial courts of the turn of the 20th century and inter-war Europe. ISBN13: 9780750934695.

Here, author John Van der Kiste brings you the facts about each of the monarch's sons and daughters – from the "mischievous" Princess Victoria to the troublesome heir to the throne, Prince Albert (later Edward VII).

She hated and dreaded the thought of childbearing, and yet within a few weeks of her wedding she was pregnant. On 21 November that year, a child – the first of nine – was born. When the doctor informed Victoria that she had a princess, she answered firmly that the next will be a prince.

Still on course for publication of the next two Fonthill Media books as mentioned below, though am still waiting for the ALL AROUND MY HAT cover design.

This is a fascinating portrait of the Princess and how she played a colorful role from her birth in 1876.

Comments

Authis Authis
Good book, but seeing that Princess Victoria Melita isn't a senior royal during the height of her grandmother's tenure, there's less information about her and her family. This book will give you enough information about her and her life during her grandmother's time. Being subjected to a marriage that was not really what she wanted, to a cousin that she didn't really love. She's another one of those stories, forced marriage, in her situation is different because her grandmother Queen Victoria favored the match between her grandson Grand Duke Ernest Louis of Hesse. It is disappointing that she was disillusioned in her marriage that she did not paid much attention to her only child with her first husband. She followed her heart and moved on to marry another cousin from her Russian side of the family despite the advice her mother told her about getting involved with the men in her family. In the very end, it looks like karma caught up with her when her second husband Grand Duke Kyrill cheated on her and she took it hard. But despite the kind of lifestyle she pursued and how she did things, she was able to manage to provide and keep things going for her family, talented enough to paint for source of income. In the end, it looks she died devastated.
Legionstatic Legionstatic
n 1894, in a little duchy in Germany, there was a wedding between two cousins. Anyone who was anyone in European royalty descended on the small, charming city of Darmstadt in the Grand Duchy of Hesse. The groom was handsome and young, of artistic sensibilities, and a grandchild of the Queen-Empress, Victoria of England. The bride was also a grandchild of the Queen, beautiful and a bit stern, without the merriment of her older sister Marie. Overjoyed at arranging the marriage of two of her grandchildren, the Queen had great promise for this union.

John van der Kiste's biography, Princess Victoria Melita, tells the story of the bride at the wedding. He starts with the story of her parents, the second son of the Queen, Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, and her mother, the only daughter of Tsar Alexander II, Marie Alexandrovna. The marriage was certainly an odd one, and Marie did not settle in well with her English in laws. Queen Victoria did not apprieciate the fact that Marie had a better jewelry collection than she did, that Marie remained a Russian Orthodox in religious matters, and that Marie regarded being born a Grand Duchess of Russia far better than she did marrying into the English royal family. Alfred, for his part, was rumored to have married Marie for her enormous dowry, and the fact that he was getting a bit older to continue being a single man -- still, despite the obstacles, they did manage to produce four daughters and a son to continue the family line.

The daughters were all considered to be attractive, and the eldest, Marie -- or 'Missy' -- was the most beautiful, and would eventually become the Queen of Romania. In constrast to Missy's blonde and blue eyed prettiness, the second daughter, Victoria Melita -- who was refered to as 'Ducky' in the family for her long neck -- was dark, serious and more solemn than her sister. When it was proposed that she marry the young Grand Duke of Hesse, Ducky put up hardly a murmur of protest, after all, her grandmother and mother were in favor of the match and she would have to marry someone someday.

Ernst of Hesse, was attractive, and Ducky would become a reigning duchess in the sprawling German Empire. His sisters had all married brilliantly, except for Alix, who acted as his hostess. He was interested in poetry and the arts, and if there were a few whispers about his rather ambiguous sexuality, no one really said anything -- after all, marriage would settle him down and he and his bride would soon start producing a crop of little princes and princesses.

The wedding was attended by most of Europe's monarchs, in the bride's home of Coburg in Germany, but in fact was overshadowed by another couple -- the proposal of the Tsarevich Nicholas of Russia to the groom's youngest sister, Alix. Nothing is recorded of Ducky's reaction to being more or less ignored at her own wedding, but it would provide a premonition of what the future would hold.

The marriage failed, spectacularly. They only had a daughter, Elizabeth, who would die in childhood of typhoid, and Ducky vented her frustrations in travel and horseback riding. In 1896, she went to Russia for the coronation of her in-laws, Nicholas and Alix, and met a Romanov cousin for the first time. He was Cyril Vladimirovich, young and handsome, and certainly interested in Ducky. The marriage between Ducky and Ernst grew ever more strained, and they would divorce in 1901; Elizabeth would live the rest of her brief life in an ever shifting round between her Romanov relations and her parents. With her loss, Ducky's last tie to Hesse was broken and in a daring move, turned around and married her cousin Cyril.

Both sides of the family were shocked and horrified. Tsar Nicholas banished his cousin and his wife from Russia, stripped Cyril of his income and title of Grand Duke, and his wife, Empress Alexandra, was furious that Ducky would spurn her beloved brother Ernie. Despite these obstacles, the marriage started off as a very happy one. There would be two daughters born soon afterwards, Marie and Kira, and eventually, Cyril would have his title and wealth restored. Known as the Grand Duchess Victoria Feodorovna, Ducky entered St. Petersburg society, and gloried in the splendour and social life of pre-war Russia. When the Revolution struck, Cyril and Ducky fled with their children to Finland, and later to France.

Cyril in exile declared himself Emperor of Russia, a title that no one really took seriously, and Ducky battled ill-health and strained finances. It was a terrible blow for her pride and ego, and later photographs show a gaunt, haggard woman. While she had a beloved son who was born in 1917, Ducky prefered a quiet life, and a last betrayal by a husband for whom she had sacrificed everything was the final torment for her.

Van der Kiste does a sympathetic and interesting biography of a princess who dared enough to break the rules of Victorian propriety. While the writing style does get rather heavy at times, he's wise enough to use contemporary letters and accounts to show how a divorce was regarded, and what was expected of those living in a spotlight. Along with sources, notes and a bibliography, genealogical charts and an insert of black and white photographs give a well-rounded survey of two minor royals.

Recommended.
Steel_Blade Steel_Blade
This was a book that needed to be written, and it needed more flesh to make it seem less skinny. I say that, because Princess (later Grand Duchess) Victoria Melita was far from a skinny person in terms of her character. She was strong and stubborn, the perfect (or diasterous) mix of both her parents, only without the looks of her elder sister, the Queen Marie of Roumania. What sets Princess Victoria Melita apart from her female cousins is, she has the strength of will equal to her ruling remale cousins (Queen Marie of Roumania, Empress Alexandra of Russia, Queen Ena of Spain, Queen Sophie of Greece, & too a lesser extent, Queen Maud of Norway) but she herself was never to rule. Her 1st husband she had the nerve & courage to divorce, she faced family censure and anger, then remarried and face the fury of her mighty cousins, Tsar Nicholas & Empress Alexandra (who were previously also her in-laws!!) by marrying her cousin against the wishes of the Tsar. She is 2nd best because her life was so colorful and dramatic, and yet, she never became a Queen/Empress herself. Needed more flesh, but otherwise, a good book to build up your library...like anyother Van der Kiste book.
Lilegha Lilegha
I had been hard-pressed to find any books exclusively about this second daughter of Victoria and Albert's second son (Alfred) and his illustrious wife, the former Grand Duchess Marie of Russia. If you are not hooked on history, you will be after you are finished with this very informative, well-written book.
ARE ARE
I've read nearly evey book available about Romanov family members, but somehow missed this one until recently. Not so much detail as "Fatal Passion" but still an excellent overview and enjoyable read. Don't expect huge insights, but solid nevertheless.
Kekinos Kekinos
It's a good book, it just lacks something...perhaps a touch of sparkle to its writing style to make it more appealing to the casual reader.
Kefym Kefym
I liked the book. The main character is quite complex. She had two marriages to cousins and seemed as though she was a strong person. I liked the other bio. That was written of her better . I was curious to compare them. She had an interesting life with danger romance drama.
Queen Victoria and all her children and grandchildren are such interesting people to read about!! She was a sad princess though