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eBook The Rise Of Napoleon Bonaparte ePub

eBook The Rise Of Napoleon Bonaparte ePub

by Robert Asprey

  • ISBN: 046504879X
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Robert Asprey
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books (November 22, 2000)
  • Pages: 608
  • ePub book: 1824 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1269 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 754

Description

Top 32 Napoleon Bonaparte Books. Osprey’s Campaign title for the Battle of Vittoria during the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815)

Top 32 Napoleon Bonaparte Books. 3. An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Uniforms of the Napoleonic Wars by Digby Smith. Osprey’s Campaign title for the Battle of Vittoria during the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815). Despite Wellington’s success against Marmont’s army at Salamanca in July, the year of 1812 ended in bitter disappointment for the British. In The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte, Asprey showed us that Napoleon was not the father of chaos, but rather an heir to it. In this companion volume, we see Napoleon struggling to subdue the turmoil.

Previously published as v. 2 of The rise and fall of Napoleon Bonaparte.

Asprey tells this fascinating, tragic tale in lush narrative detail. The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte is an exciting, reckless thrill ride as Asprey charts Napoleon's vertiginous ascent to fame and the height of power. Here is Napoleon as he was-not saint, not sinner, but a man dedicated to and ultimately devoured by his vision of himself, his empire, and his world.

The Rise Of Napoleon Bona. has been added to your Cart. He really brings out the Napoleon Bonaparte battlefield genius. He also depicts France in the post revolution period as one fraught with danger of poor alliances and deception

The Rise Of Napoleon Bona. He also depicts France in the post revolution period as one fraught with danger of poor alliances and deception. He filled in many of my blank spots regarding the period after the throne was toppled and before Napoleon became the consulate leader. The geography was extremely comp!icated.

Robert Asprey's book traces the journey of a small boy from Corsica, on a journey from solider to emperor. He would turn the entire world on its ear; nothing would ever be the same again because Napoleon existed. He would knock kings off their ancient thrones and put his own relatives upon them. He would win battles against formidable odds; he would make incredible discoveries from his time in Egypt that would change the way we look at ancient history

Now in The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte, the first volume of a magisterial two-volume biography, we get to see Napoleon, the man. Robert Asprey invites the reader to look over Napoleon's shoulder as he dictates decrees.

Now in The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte, the first volume of a magisterial two-volume biography, we get to see Napoleon, the man. The rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. Interested in learning about history, leaders, and dictators. Like how this book goes into detail about battles fought and mental state during these battles. Have not completed the book, so therefore cannot provide too much detail. But is interesting to read how he rose to the command level during battles beign fought. Наиболее популярные в Научная литература.

Asprey tells this fascinating, tragic tale in lush narrative detail Books related to The Rise Of Napoleon Bonaparte. Books related to The Rise Of Napoleon Bonaparte. The History of Napoleon Bonaparte.

Robert Brown Asprey (February 16, 1923 – January 26, 2009) was an American military historian and author, noted for his books on military history published between 1959 and 2001.

Napoleon Bonaparte SeriesRobert B. Asprey. The Reign of Napoleon Bonaparte. Although a great book, packed with military campaign detail, I was looking for more of a Biography of Napoleon's life.

Ever since his untimely death at age fifty-one on the forlorn and windswept island of St. Helena, Napoleon Bonaparte has been depicted as either demi-god or devil incarnate. Now, in The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte, the first volume of a magisterial two-volume biography, we at last get Napoleon the man. Robert Asprey tells this fascinating, tragic tale in lush narrative detail. He invites the reader to look over Napoleon's shoulder as he dictates decrees and orders; deals with his ungrateful, greedy, unprincipled family; comes into conflict with the royalty of Europe; mingles with the intellectuals, writers, musicians, and actors of the day; leads and inspires his officers and men; and falls in love and fathers children with Josephine, Marie Louise, and various mistresses. The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte becomes an exciting, reckless thrill ride as Asprey charts Napoleon's vertiginous ascent to fame and the height of power. Here is Napoleon as he was-not saint, not sinner, but a man dedicated to and ultimately devoured by his vision of himself, his empire, and his world.

Comments

Sorryyy Sorryyy
I think some of the reviewers for this book were expecting a lengthy tome that dissected each day of Napoleon's life.
This is not a book written by a stuffy academic FOR stuffy academics, which is what a lot of biographies end up being. It's one professor seeking to impress his colleagues with how many minute details he can cram into a 1,000 page book. Those types of books are not for general consumption.
This one is.
The book is written by a military man, which I appreciate, because it makes the subject readable. In the military, you write in brief...you don't write lengthy documents, because no one has the time to read them.

Asprey does a good job of summarizing Napoleon's life. If all you know about Napoleon is from your formal education or from general knowledge, than this book is perfect for you.
Each short chapter deals with a short period of Napoleon's life from his birth on Corsica up through his victory at Austerlitz. I have not yet read the follow-up volume which details the reign and fall of Napoleon. I enjoyed Asprey's writing style which is as much story-teller as it is historian. History need not be dull, as it tends to be with many academic books.

This may not be the most complete biography of Napoleon but it's probably one of the most readable in terms of keeping the average reader interested. No, there is no deep-dive into Napoleon's grades when he was 15 or the march leading up to Austerlitz...if you want deep discussions of single battles or campaigns, there are books for those.

I also enjoyed the fact that Asprey wasn't trying to prove something; there is no grand argument in his writing. Probably a side-affect of him not writing for academia but for the general public. He writes to inform, not to argue. Too many histories have some overarching theme like "Napoleon actually wasn't a great general because..." Those are usually some PhD's thesis or dissertation, which they have simply turned into a book.

I did find it odd that this book ends with Austerlitz and not with the coup that brought Napoleon to power. That is probably where I would have made the cut, but that's a small matter.

Anyway, for anyone who simply wants to learn more about Napoleon and the times in which he lived, this is a fine book to read.
Anarus Anarus
It is impossible to write a biography of a hyper-active mover and shaker like Napoleon Bonaparte in 1000 pages. Asprey's 2 volumes may be the best possible attempt, but it can't come near being fully satisfactory.

The problem lies in the fact that the man's life is an integral part of his time, and his time was very busy. While he grew up, the fate of Corsica between Italy, France, and independence dominated his life, then the French Revolution, then his rise to power in the post-revolutionary chaos, etc. You can't tell the story of these developments in a few lines without being superficial, inaccurate, and confusing to the non-expert. Asprey tries it anyway and does a credible job.

One of the questions that I always wanted to ask about NB is: how could he make such a military career so young? Answer: the revolution had caused a huge gap of officer material, which needed to be filled fast as the rest of Europe was about to attack the young republic. That placed young NB in an advantageous position despite earlier problems of AWOL times and known rebellious actions, which might have been fatal at other times.
The second reason is that the man was a military genius. I have always tended to think little of that kind of talent, but at least I am able now to appreciate the complexity of the job and sheer physical demands that this general met. He was also a skilled administrator, a keen legal mind, a hard and fast worker, and a great PR man.
The book is largely in admiration, except when it comes to NB's obsession with England and challenging its naval superiority. It seems that common sense deserted him. By half time of the 2 volume biography, we are left with the impression of a super talented maniac who ran out of self-control.

The early wars of revolutionary France against the rest of Europe are a good case study on the subject of 'regime change'. We can see how outside interference can make a nation 'come together' in resistance against the outside even under terror regimes. There can be little doubt that the revolution would have run a different course if Austria, Prussia, England, Russia had not tried to stop it. (There can, similarly, be little doubt that a war against Iran, now, would weld a majority of the Iranian people together with the current leaders, despite latent opposition.)

Core pieces of this first of two volumes are the Italian and Egyptian campaigns and the wars against the anti-revolutionary coalitions. These are periods that I did not know much about, and now I still don't know all that much more. Probably one needs to look for specialized monographs.

This is an action thriller among historical biographies. On the other hand, pure action gets tedious. We need interpretation and plot construction. Asprey doesn't spend much time with that. The consequence of that is the fact that this book is more a useful reference handbook than a satisfactory biography.
Footnote: the handbook function is particularly relevant for readers of the Aubrey/Maturin novels which look at the struggles of the time from the English and anti-Napoleon angle.
Felolune Felolune
It's hard to bury a story as brilliant as the life of Bonaparte, but this one seems to try hard to do just that. Asprey definitely warms to his subject, but he doesn't have the verbal facility of a Barbara Tuchman or David McCullough to really dig into the meat of the story and bring it forward for hungry readers. It's history at a slight remove, which makes it dry and textbook-like. There's also times when I had to doubt the veracity of Asprey's story, such as where he botches the retelling of the last hours of the Robespierre brothers (any simple check of another contemporary history source will give you a completely different version), which of course makes me worry about the integrity of the entire book. I'm nearly done with this volume and really on the fence about whether to buy the second half or just go on to another historian and start the story over entirely again.