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eBook The Polish Deportees of World War II: Recollections of Removal to the Soviet Union and Dispersal Throughout the World ePub

eBook The Polish Deportees of World War II: Recollections of Removal to the Soviet Union and Dispersal Throughout the World ePub

by Tadeusz Piotrowski

  • ISBN: 0786432586
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Tadeusz Piotrowski
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McFarland; Paperback edition (September 14, 2007)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1570 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1405 kb
  • Other: rtf txt txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 960

Description

The book is easily written and is based on recollections of deportees, I would recommend this .

The book is easily written and is based on recollections of deportees, I would recommend this for descendants of the Poles who were deported, and any one who would like to understand life during the WWII deportations. 3 people found this helpful. Only the unexpected German attack on its erstwhile Soviet ally in July 1941 limited the scope of this genocide by putting a halt to further deportations and eventually prompting the release of the emaciated but still-living captive Poles. Piotrowski describes the harrowing experiences of the Poles in Soviet captivity through the eyes of several eyewitnesses, including "Eva", my aunt.

Start by marking The Polish Deportees of World War II. .Among the great tragedies that befell Poland during World War II was the forced deportation of its citizens by the Soviet Union during the first Soviet occupation of that country between 1939 and 1941.

Start by marking The Polish Deportees of World War II: Recollections of Removal to the Soviet Union and Dispersal Throughout the World as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This is the story of that brutal Soviet ethnic cleansing campaign told in the words of some of the survivors.

War experiences: the emotional health and wellbeing of Polish elderly immigrants.

Publications citing this paper. War experiences: the emotional health and wellbeing of Polish elderly immigrants. Cites background & methods. The Allen Institute for AIProudly built by AI2 with the help of our.

The Polish Deportees of World War II: Recollections of Removal to the Soviet Union and Dispersal Throughout the World. In September 1939, after the Soviet Union occupied Eastern Poland in accordance with the Soviet-German Nonaggression Pact, Stalin planned to use a tactic that the czars had repeatedly tried on a lesser scale for long-term control of this vast region. The documents reveal the conception and planning for the deportations.

Among the great tragedies that befell Poland during World War II was the forced deportation of its citizens by the Soviet Union during the first Soviet occupation of that country between 1939 and 1941

Among the great tragedies that befell Poland during World War II was the forced deportation of its citizens by the Soviet Union during the first Soviet occupation of that country between 1939 and 1941. It is an unforgettable human drama of excruciating martyrdom in the Gulag. For example, one witness reports: "A young woman who had given birth on the train threw herself and her newborn under the wheels of an approaching train

Published by McFarland & Company In. Jefferson and London 2004. 248 pp. ISBN 0-7864-1847-8. In this book the rescued children tell their stories – not with rancor or bitterness, but with hope that their words will further the cause of peace.

Amnesty for Polish citizens in USSR refers to a one-time amnesty in the USSR for those deprived of their freedom following the Soviet invasion of Poland in World War II. The signing of amnesty by the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet on 12 August 1941,. The signing of amnesty by the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet on 12 August 1941, resulted in temporary stop of persecutions of Polish citizens under the Soviet occupation.

Recollections of Removal to the Soviet Union and Dispersal Throughout the World. Theresa Kurk McGinley. These are the histories of the Soviet gulags and aftermath, of the precarious amnesty which freed incarcerated Poles and set in motion an immigration wave which reached the shores of nations around the world.

of World War II : Recollections of Removal to the Soviet Union and Dispersal Throughout the World.

The Polish Deportees of World War II : Recollections of Removal to the Soviet Union and Dispersal Throughout the World.

Among the great tragedies that befell Poland during World War II was the forced deportation of its citizens by the Soviet Union during the first Soviet occupation of that country between 1939 and 1941. This is the story of that brutal Soviet ethnic cleansing campaign told in the words of some of the survivors. It is an unforgettable human drama of excruciating martyrdom in the Gulag. For example, one witness reports: "A young woman who had given birth on the train threw herself and her newborn under the wheels of an approaching train." Survivors also tell the story of events after the "amnesty." "Our suffering is simply indescribable. We have spent weeks now sleeping in lice-infested dirty rags in train stations," wrote the Milewski family. Details are also given on the non-European countries that extended a helping hand to the exiles in their hour of need.

Comments

Umge Umge
I couldn't put this book down. I found out my great uncle and his family were deportees. It made me sick to know such a thing happened. Well worth knowing this part of Polish history.
Kanrad Kanrad
Every American needs to read this book. It is a testimony of the evil that the Socialism is and what it does to innocent humans in its name. Very somber read.
Tat Tat
I really enjoyed this book. It is absolutely heartbreaking, but it shed light on a part of WWII history I was not familiar with. I loved reading these new insights (new to me at least) about life for these refugees. The story is overall a sad, but hopeful one of suffering combined with a beautiful resilience.
Goldcrusher Goldcrusher
The book is easily written and is based on recollections of deportees, I would recommend this for descendants of the Poles who were deported, and any one who would like to understand life during the WWII deportations.
Winn Winn
My Grandfather and his family were also "guests" of Stalin and sent to Siberia in 1939. What people forget is that the Poles, Russians, and Germans were enemies well before the Second World War. In fact, the the animosity goes as far back as the late 18th Century.

Another fact that is lost is that the Poles continued to fight for their country well after their initial defeat in 1939. They fielded the 4th largest Army against the Nazis during WWII and helped liberate France and Italy. My grandfather ended up with the Polish Second Corps after Poles were released from Siberia to fill the depleted ranks against Germany. However,

Glad to come across this book.
avanger avanger
Another account on the de-humanization of a people.Gee, I wonder why there aren't any films on this?