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eBook Hostage to Fortune: The Letters of Joseph P. Kennedy ePub

eBook Hostage to Fortune: The Letters of Joseph P. Kennedy ePub

by Joseph P. Kennedy

  • ISBN: 0670869694
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Joseph P. Kennedy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Viking Adult (January 8, 2001)
  • Pages: 800
  • ePub book: 1914 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1544 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi doc lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 683

Description

Since this book contains letters from Joseph P. Kennedy, its layout is different than a typical book. The letters are printed as they were written which leads to an atypical reading style. Personally, I didn't like the layout.

Since this book contains letters from Joseph P. Also, the letters proved how much Joseph P. Kennedy and his wife Rose truly missed out on. Apparently they both missed the first communion and confirmation of their eldest son, Joseph. I can't imagine anything being that important to skip such an important event in a child's life.

Hostage to Fortune book. Joseph P. Kennedy remains one of the most enigmatic and controversial figures in American history. From his humble beginnings as the son of Irish immigrants to his meteoric rise to statesman, diplomat, and finally to First Father, he has been both beloved and vilified. In Hostage to Fortune: The Letters of Joseph P. Kennedy, Amanda Smith has unearthed an extraordinary Joseph P.

Patrick Joseph Kennedy (January 14, 1858 – May 18, 1929) was an American businessman and politician from Boston, Massachusetts. After cholera killed his father and brother, Kennedy was the only surviving male in his family

Patrick Joseph Kennedy (January 14, 1858 – May 18, 1929) was an American businessman and politician from Boston, Massachusetts. After cholera killed his father and brother, Kennedy was the only surviving male in his family. He started work at age fourteen as a stevedore in the docks and became a successful businessman, later owning three saloons and a whisky import house. Eventually, he had major interests in coal and banking as well.

Joseph Kennedy, father of President John F. Kennedy and Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy, held many different positions in both public and private life: from banker to film producer to chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission to diplomat, to father. Many of his letters and journal entries are made public for the first time in this volume, giving insights not only into the Kennedy family but also into Wall Street and Hollywood in the.

Joseph P. In the only firsthand record of his life, Hostage to Fortune begins in I914, with the honeymoon of Joe and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy in Atlantic City and ends in I96I with Joe's disabling stroke. In between, we see the public and private Kennedy - father, husband, film producer, and New Deal government official.

book by Amanda Smith. The previously unpublished letters of Joseph Kennedy offer new insights into the man who fathered so many great Americans as they capture his relationships with his wife, children, and the great figures of his age, including Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Pope Pius XII, and Charles Lindbergh, among others.

It’s a great book; it’s a collection of letters to and from Kennedy, most of them from his children (though there are a lot of other letters in there as well). The best books on The Kennedys. David Nasaw, Biographer.

the letters of Joseph P. Kennedy. Letters of Joseph P. by Kennedy, Joseph P. 2 Want to read. Includes bibliographical references (p. 723-738) and index. 97. /092, B. Library of Congress.

Starting in January 1920, the United States became a dry country. Prohibition banned the manufacture and sale of alcohol in an attempt to civilize unruly Americans (and some other reasons). The experiment had many unintended consequences, but most dangerously, it fostered the rise of organized crime and the American Mafia.

The previously unpublished letters of Joseph Kennedy offer new insights into the man who fathered so many great Americans as they capture his relationships with his wife, children, and the great figures of his age, including Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Pope Pius XII, and Charles Lindbergh, among others. First serial, The New Yorker.

Comments

Fecage Fecage
This book was interesting in that the words of members of the Kennedy family come alive for the reader. Amanda Smith, Joe Kennedy's granddaughter, did a fantastic job with research to give the reader a background of world events concerning some of the people mentioned in the letters. She also provides a brief summary before each section summarizing the events of that period of time. It must have took her many years to gather all these letters and do her research, but her efforts show on every page and the final product must be very satisfying to her, as it is to the reader. I found it a little slow moving in the section where Joe is Ambassador to Great Britain and he discusses the war and world leaders who are key players. My favorite was reading the letters of the children as they got into their teenage years. Kathleen Kennedy's letters were especially fascinating to me in light of her marriage to a Protestant, which did not go over too well with her mother, Rose. She also describes life in London, where she was the only member of the family who was really loved there and she had so many friends and great experiences while she lived there. Recommended for all Kennedy fans.
Alsath Alsath
For anyone who wonders why the Kennedys thought so much of their father; you can find out by reading this book.
Hatе&love Hatе&love
Since this book contains letters from Joseph P. Kennedy, its layout is different than a typical book. The letters are printed as they were written which leads to an atypical reading style. Personally, I didn't like the layout. Also, the letters proved how much Joseph P. Kennedy and his wife Rose truly missed out on. Apparently they both missed the first communion and confirmation of their eldest son, Joseph. I can't imagine anything being that important to skip such an important event in a child's life.

Those expecting this book to be a whitewash will be pleasantly surprised by how honest this portrayal is (at times disarmingly so) -- Smith certainly does not shy away from the more controversial aspects of his life. Rather, she uses his letters, memos, diaries and unpublished manuscripts to reveal Kennedy's true personality and political beliefs

Amanda Smith does a fair job in assembling a number of letters to, from and about her grandfather, Joseph P. Kennedy. She does not hold back some of the more unsavory parts of his life, from the affair with Gloria Swanson to the use of racist terms for blacks and disparaging comments about Jews. Her introductary essay is very moving and well written. Certainly this book helps dispel a number of the myths that the sensationalist books on the Kennedy patriarch seem to propel
Cozius Cozius
Famed patriarch Joseph Kennedy Sr.'s granddaughter, Amanda Smith (she is the daughter of Jean Kennedy Smith) did an extraordinary job of collecting missives written by various family members over a period of nearly half a century. The years 1914-1961 are meticulously laid out in militarily neat precision; it is through these letters that readers glean insights into the dynamics of a famous family.
My favorite parts in the book were the letters to, by and about the late Senator Robert Kennedy. Third son and seventh child of patriarch Joseph Kennedy, readers are treated to witness his growth and development, almost from the beginning. A composition he wrote at age 13 describing himself and his preferences is enlightening. One can smile at the boy who strove to keep up with his older siblings revisited in the man who achieved leadership status. From all accounts, Robert Kennedy was a diligent worker; the boy who sought to make himself heard by his siblings and by Joe, Sr. became the man who served as the voice for many. In adult life his voice was one that was very much heard and resounded throughout history. In reading this, it was impossible not to cheer his progress and feel encouraged by what he accomplished in his lifetime.
This is a delightful "peek behind the curtain" into the dynamics of generations of Kennedys.
I loved it.
Gunos Gunos
Unfortunately, not many biographies of Joe Kennedy are available, and most of them are written by authors who make no effort to hide their hostility towards him. So it's about time that a balance was brought to the equation, and Amanda Smith has done a fine job of that.

Perhaps a book like this could only be written by a member of the Kennedy family, as most of JPK's personal and business papers remain off limits to researchers at the Kennedy Library.

Those expecting this book to be a whitewash will be pleasantly surprised by how honest this portrayal is (at times disarmingly so) -- Smith certainly does not shy away from the more controversial aspects of his life. Rather, she uses his letters, memos, diaries and unpublished manuscripts to reveal Kennedy's true personality and political beliefs.

As someone who initially approached this book with a healthy skepticism, I must say that Smith's documentation is impeccable; she approaches her subject with the kind of objectivity one would expect from a journalist or academic, not that of a family member trying to protect the legacy of a deceased relative.

While some might think that an 800-page book of letters and documents could make for a boring read, this is not the case here. Actually, this book is quite the page-turner! I honestly couldn't put it down and was hooked from start to finish. In many aspects, "Hostage to Fortune" is better than a traditional biography because there is no room here for outside interpretation by the author. Reading Joe Kennedy in his own words is probably the closest any of us will ever get to understanding this very fascinating, ambitious, opinionated, and complex man.

Highly recommended for serious researchers and all who are interested in how the Kennedy family dynasty came to be.