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eBook The Dynasty of Chernigov, 1146-1246 ePub

eBook The Dynasty of Chernigov, 1146-1246 ePub

by Martin Dimnik

  • ISBN: 0521824427
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Martin Dimnik
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 2nd edition (July 14, 2003)
  • Pages: 476
  • ePub book: 1883 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1270 kb
  • Other: rtf mbr azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 828

Description

Dimnik, . The Dynasty of Chernigov, 1054–1146, Toronto, 1994. Mezentsev, V. Drevniy Chernigov: Genezis i istoricheskaya topografiya goroda, Doctoral dissertation, The Institute of History of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Kyiv, 1981.

Dimnik, . Dimnik, . Succession and Inheritance in Rus’ before 1054, Mediaeval Studies 58 (1996), 87–117. A Bride's Journey from Kiev to Vladimir (1211): Pitfalls in Using V. N. Tatishchev as a Source, Roma, magistra mundi. The Masonry Churches of Medieval Chernihiv, Harvard Ukrainian Studies (Cambridge, Mass. 11, number 3/4 (1987), 365–83.

Historians in pre-revolutionary Russia, in the Soviet Union, in contemporary Russia, and in the West have consistently relegated the medieval dynasty of Chernigov to a place of minor importance in Kievan Rus'. This view was reinforced by the evidence that, after the Mongols invaded Rus' in 1237, the two branches from the House of Monomakh living in the Rostov-Suzdal' and Galicia-Volyn' regions emerged as the most powerful.

Examining the later twelfth- and early thirteenth-century history of the dynasty of Chernigov, this study demonstrates that the princes of Chernigov were among the most powerful in Kievan Rus'. It therefore challenges the established view of the political history of Kievan Rus'

Roman Mikhailovich the Old (c. 1218 – after 1288 ) was a Rus' prince (a member of the Rurik dynasty). He was prince of Chernigov (1246/1247 – after 1288), and of Bryansk (1246 – after 1288).

Roman Mikhailovich the Old (c. Roman was the second son of Mikhail Vsevolodovich (who later became prince of Chernigov, and grand prince of Kiev) by his wife, Elena Romanovna (or Maria Romanovna), a daughter of prince Roman Mstislavich of Halych. His mother most likely persuaded her husband to name their second son after her father.

It therefore challenges the established viewof the political history of Kievan Rus'.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Dynasty of Chernigov. The history of the dynasty’s first hundred years appeared in 1994 as The Dynasty of Chernigov 1054–1146. The Dynasty of Chernigov. It began with the year in which Svyatoslav Yaroslavich became the autonomous prince of Chernigov and ended with the year in which his grandson Vsevolod Ol′govich died as prince of Kiev. The present volume continues with the succession of Vsevolod’s brother Igor′ to Kiev and ends with the year 1246, when Vsevolod’s great-grandson Mikhail Vsevolodovich died as the last autonomous senior prince of the dynasty.

1. Martin Dimnik Mikhail, Prince of Chernigov In the meantime Martin Dimnik has published two books about the "Dynasty of Chernigov" 1054-1146 an. . Martin Dimnik Mikhail, Prince of Chernigov. An excellent book about the life and times of Mikhail Vsevolodich, Saint Mikhail", strictly based on authentic sources. In the meantime Martin Dimnik has published two books about the "Dynasty of Chernigov" 1054-1146 and 1146-1246. 2. Setsu Shigematsu Scream from the Shadows: The Women's Liberation Movement in Japan. More than forty years ago a women’s liberation movement called ūman ribu was born in Japan amid conditions of radicalism, violence, and imperialist aggression.

Examining the later twelfth- and early thirteenth-century history of the dynasty of Chernigov, this study demonstrates that the princes of Chernigov were among the most powerful in Kievan Rus'. It therefore challenges the established view of the political history of Kievan Rus'. Unlike other studies, it also examines in detail themes such as succession and inheritance, rivalries for domains, marriage alliances, the role of trade in inter-dynastic relations, nomadic incursions on Rus', and princely relations with the Church.