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eBook Mary Boleyn: The Mistress of Kings ePub

eBook Mary Boleyn: The Mistress of Kings ePub

by Alison Weir

  • ISBN: 034552134X
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Alison Weir
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books (September 4, 2012)
  • Pages: 416
  • ePub book: 1616 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1947 kb
  • Other: doc txt lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 860

Description

Alison Weir's Mary Boleyn substantially redeems her subject's reputation by disputing her scandalous portrayal in Philippa Gregory's novel The Other Boleyn Girl

Alison Weir's Mary Boleyn substantially redeems her subject's reputation by disputing her scandalous portrayal in Philippa Gregory's novel The Other Boleyn Girl. Our most detailed view yet of a power behind the throne. With titles like Elizabeth and The Lady in the Tower, Weir has carved out a niche as one of the foremost biographers of British royalty.

Mary Boleyn : mistress of kings, Alison Weir. Mary Boleyn represents only one short episode in Henry VIII’s checkered love life; all we can say with certainty is that she was his mistress for a short period while he was married to his first wife, Katherine of Aragon. eISBN: 978-0-7710-8923-7. 1. Boleyn, Mary, 1508-1543. 2. Henry VIII, King of England, 1491-1547 – Relations with women. 3. Great Britain – Kings and rulers – Paramours – Biography. 4. Great Britain – History – Henry VIII, 1509-1547. Mary’s true historical significance-and importance-lies in the implications of her royal affair for her more celebrated sister, Ann.

This book shows the exceptional scholarship of Alison Weir. In this detailed biography of Mary Boleyn, the eldest daughter of Sir Thomas Boleyn, Ms. Weir leaves no stone unturned. She talks of Mary’s genealogy and lifestyle. She discusses Mary’s relationship with her more infamous younger sister, Anne, and of the affairs she had with the French King Francois I and the English Henry VIII. She refutes certain writers, such as those with a particular axe to grind or who were just repeating gossip.

Alison Weir pieces together a life steeped in mystery and misfortune, debunking centuries-old myths to give us the truth about Mary Boleyn, the so-called great and infamous whore. Look for special features inside. Join the Circle for author chats and more.

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Alison Weir is the New York Times bestselling author of several historical biographies, including The Lady in the Tower, Mistress of the Monarchy, Henry VIII, Eleanor of Aquitaine, The Life of Elizabeth I, and The Six Wives of Henry VIII, and of the novels Captive Queen, Innocent Traitor, and The Lady Elizabeth. written about Mary Boleyn in history books belongs more properly to historical novels. One could go on; the fact is that-as we will see-much of what has been written about Mary Boleyn in history books belongs more properly to historical novels.

Author: Weir, Alison Publisher: Ballantine Books

Author: Weir, Alison Publisher: Ballantine Books. Condition: New! Binding: Hardcover Publish date: 2011. Weir unravels the truth about Mary's much-vaunted notoriety at the French court and her relations with King Fran ois I. She offers plausible theories as to what happened to Mary during the undocumented years of her life, and shows that, far from marrying an insignificant and complacent nonentity, she made a brilliant match with a young man who was the. King's cousin and a rising star at court. Weir also explores Mary's own position and role at the English court, and how she became Henry VIII's mistress.

NATIONAL BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE   New York Times bestselling author and noted British historian Alison Weir gives us the first full-scale, in-depth biography of Mary Boleyn, sister to Queen Anne as well as mistress to Anne’s husband, Henry VIII—and one of the most misunderstood figures of the Tudor age. Making use of extensive original research, Weir shares revelations on the ambitious Boleyn family and the likely nature of the relationship between the Boleyn sisters. Unraveling the truth about Mary’s much-vaunted notoriety at the French court and her relations with King François I, Weir also explores Mary’s role at the English court and how she became Henry VIII’s lover. She tracks the probable course of their affair and investigates the truth behind Mary’s notorious reputation. With new and compelling evidence, Weir presents the most conclusive answer to date on the paternity of Mary’s children, long speculated to have been Henry VIII’s progeny. Alison Weir pieces together a life steeped in mystery and misfortune, debunking centuries-old myths to give us the truth about Mary Boleyn, the so-called “great and infamous whore.”   Look for special features inside. Join the Circle for author chats and more.

Comments

Road.to sliver Road.to sliver
Ms. Weir managed to create a whole book by basically repeating page after page that the historical record on Mary Boleyn is thin. At least she's discredited those historians who've claimed otherwise.

But my big issue here is that the book is so poorly edited. In Chapter 11, for example, Ms. Weir identifies Arthur Plantagenet, Viscount Lisle, as the cousin of Henry VIII. Lisle was the half-brother of Henry's mother, which would make him the king's uncle. Later in that chapter, Weir asserts that the Earl of Wiltshire, Mary's father, was considering "leaving (Mary's) share of his property to "his niece, the future Elizabeth I." Ms. Weir surely knows that Wiltshire was Elizabeth's grandfather, not her uncle.

Really, these are errors that should have been picked up by any editor.
Siramath Siramath
5 stars

This book shows the exceptional scholarship of Alison Weir. Her research is both exhaustive and concise. In this detailed biography of Mary Boleyn, the eldest daughter of Sir Thomas Boleyn, Ms. Weir leaves no stone unturned.

She talks of Mary’s genealogy and lifestyle. She discusses Mary’s relationship with her more infamous younger sister, Anne, and of the affairs she had with the French King Francois I and the English Henry VIII. She refutes certain writers, such as those with a particular axe to grind or who were just repeating gossip.

This is a comprehensive study of Mary, her life, fashions, marriages, children as well as additional facts regarding her life. It is a fascinating study of a woman’s life about which we knew so little. The timing of certain events is very important when speaking about Mary. Some actions ascribed to her could not have happened, while others have been overlooked.

This book traces also the descendants of Mary, some of whom are still alive today, including Queen Elizabeth II. It discusses the elevation of Mary’s son Henry to knighthood and his appointment as Lord Hunsden and other honors by Queen Elizabeth I.

This book is extremely well written as are all of Alison Weir’s books. Her research is both exhaustive and complete. The book is easy to read and understand, for both the average reader as well as aficionados of Tudor history. I highly recommend it for those who want to read about the often forgotten Mary Boleyn.
Gogal Gogal
There's not a lot of hard, written evidence about Mary's life, so writing this book must have been really difficult. It is full of surmising based on related events that were recorded, and assumptions based on the fact that there is no written evidence to support anything to the contrary. The recorded facts about Mary that are presented mostly have to do with her attendance at court and her property. If you're looking for insight into her state of mind, her relationships with her siblings, or the Kings she had affairs with, there's very little to go on. Her story is murky and largely lost to time. The information just doesn't exist. Mary was apparently the Forrest Gump of her era .... A dim individual whose life played out against a famous historical backdrop.
Froststalker Froststalker
Like any other person entranced by the history of England's Tudor period, I have often wondered about what Mary Boleyn must have been like as a person. Over the years, I have encountered enough material written about her (either directly or indirectly) to form an opinion, change it, and then change it again as I discovered more and more reading material about her. It's easy enough to do so, especially since several novels about her have been published recently.

Of course, every book I read contradicted previous ones. Therefore I was quite pleased to discover this new book by Alison Weir. I have read and owned perhaps every other book she has written - both non-fiction and her recent fictional novels. From what I have seen of her work, she is very thorough in researching and, I believe, unbiased when she draws conclusions. Perhaps one of the features of Weir's work that pleases me is that she tries very hard to stick to the truth and often warns her readers to remember that these opinions are educated guesses.

Mary Boleyn was not "important" enough to leave much primary source resarch material to make researching an easy task. Much of the details which can be found about her are provided in the resources left by her contemporaries. This is always true about researching history and especially biographies; but the task is much easier when the subject has made enough of a mark in history that finding these writings are easier to find.

I was very happy with Weir's work on Boleyn. It's always pleasant when you hold high expectations and they are fulfilled. I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading non-fictional historical/biographical work. Be aware that this is not fiction - you will not be provided with insights as to what Boleyn was thinking during episodes described in the book. On the other hand, this biography is not a dry, boring recital of dates and facts.

Therefore, if you are reader who prefers bodice-ripping or even sweet scenes of Mary walking hand in hand through gardens with King Henry VIII, this book will probably bore you. But if you enjoy sinking your teeth into enough accurate background material to provide you with more insights into Boleyn's life and the time in which she lived, you will be thrilled.