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eBook Eastern Inferno: The Journals of a German Panzerjäger on the Eastern Front, 1941-43 ePub

eBook Eastern Inferno: The Journals of a German Panzerjäger on the Eastern Front, 1941-43 ePub

by Christine Alexander

  • ISBN: 1935149474
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Christine Alexander
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Casemate Pub; First Edition edition (November 30, 2010)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1438 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1224 kb
  • Other: azw lit doc rtf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 174

Description

Journal II: MARCH TO THE EAST AND THE WINTER OF 1941–42 .

Journal II: MARCH TO THE EAST AND THE WINTER OF 1941–42. Journal III: FRONTLINE WARFARE AND THE RETREAT AFTER STALINGRAD. They weren’t just the words of a German soldier on the frontlines of the Eastern Front; they were also the words of my grandfather, Hans Roth. A grandfather I would never have the privilege to know, except through the contents of his diaries. Hans Roth was in his early thirties when he was drafted into the German Army. His unit is ultimately transferred to Second Army, then Second Panzer Army, in their attempts to hold the southern flank of Army Group Center after the destruction of Sixth Army at Stalingrad.

This book, based on journals left behind by a German soldier in the 299th Infantry Division, is a well written and well . Truly amazing a journal like this survived. A birds eye view of a Wehrmacht soldier on the Eastern front from the beginning invasion up to Kursk

This book, based on journals left behind by a German soldier in the 299th Infantry Division, is a well written and well annotated history of the experiences of a single Wehrmacht soldier on the Eastern Front. Hans Roth served in the Wehrmacht's 299th Infantry Division anti-tank battalion from the first day of Operation Barbarossa, Hitler's June 1941 massive invasion of the Soviet Union, until his disappearance, with most of Army Group Center, in June 1944. A birds eye view of a Wehrmacht soldier on the Eastern front from the beginning invasion up to Kursk. His resilience what him and his men faced everyday is astounding.

Eastern Inferno book. This book is comprised of three journals written by Hans Roth, a German soldier fighting on the Eastern Front from summer 1941 to late spring 1943

Eastern Inferno book. This book is comprised of three journals written by Hans Roth, a German soldier fighting on the Eastern Front from summer 1941 to late spring 1943. He also fought in France in 1940 and was still in Russia when he disappeared in June 1944, but he didn’t have a journal in France and if he was writing one during the last year of his life, it was lost.

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Christine Alexander, Mason Kunze. The leaders know that only this move alone will be able to save us from destruction. Remaining cool-blooded is the key to success in such circumstances. Remaining cool-blooded is the key to success in such circumstances s and vice-versa; inaccurate fire from our anti-tank cannons can destroy our own assault guns. Being fired at from two sides, the second wave veers to the north, creating havoc for the third wave. Sixteen more Red tanks are destroyed and the rest attempt to take cover on the side of the hill. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Eastern Inferno book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Eastern Inferno: The Journals of a German Panzerjager on the Eastern Front, 1941-43 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

by Christine Alexander & Mason Kunze. If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.

Alexander, Christine. This book presents the journals of a German soldier who participated in Operation Barbarossa and subsequent battles on the Eastern Front, revealing the German-Russian War as seldom seen before.

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This book presents the remarkable personal journals of a German soldier who participated in Operation Barbarossa and subsequent battles on the Eastern Front, revealing the combat experience of the German-Russian War as seldom seen before.Hans Roth was a member of the anti-tank (Panzerjager) battalion, 299th Infantry Division, attached to Sixth Army, as the invasion of Russia began. Writing as events transpired, he recorded the mystery and tension as the Germans deployed on the Soviet frontier in June 1941. Then a firestorm broke loose as the Wehrmacht tore across the front, forging into the primitive vastness of the East. During the Kiev encirclement, Roth's unit was under constant attack as the Soviets desperately tried to break through the German ring. At one point, after the enemy had finally been beaten, a friend serving with the SS led him to a site where he witnessed civilians being massacred en masse (which may well have been Babi Yar). After suffering through a horrible winter against apparently endless Russian reserves, his division went on the offensive again, this time on the northern wing of "Case Gelb," the German drive toward Stalingrad.In these journals, attacks and counterattacks are described in "you are there" detail, as Roth wrote privately, as if to keep himself sane, knowing that his honest accounts of the horrors in the East could never pass through Wehrmacht censors. When the Soviet counteroffensive of winter 1942 begins, his unit is stationed alongside the Italian 8th Army, and his observations of its collapse, as opposed to the reaction of the German troops sent to stiffen its front, are of special fascination.Roth’s three journals were discovered many years after his disappearance, tucked away in the home of his brother, with whom he was known to have had a deep bond. After his brother’s death, his family discovered them and quickly sent them to Rosel, Roth’s wife. In time, Rosel handed down the journals to Erika, Roth’s only daughter, who had meantime immigrated to America.Hans Roth was doubtlessly working on a fourth journal before he was reported missing in action in July 1944 during the battle known as the Destruction of Army Group Center. Although Roth’s ultimate fate remains unknown, what he did leave behind, now finally revealed, is an incredible firsthand account of the horrific war the Germans waged in Russia.Table of ContentsDedicationPrefaceForewordJournal I:Operation Barbarossa And The Battle For KievJournal II:March To The East And The Winter Of 1941–42Journal III:Frontline Warfare And The Retreat After StalingradFinal DocumentsSuggested Reading

Comments

Hulore Hulore
This book, based on journals left behind by a German soldier in the 299th Infantry Division, is a well written and well annotated history of the experiences of a single Wehrmacht soldier on the Eastern Front. Hans Roth served in the Wehrmacht's 299th Infantry Division anti-tank battalion from the first day of Operation Barbarossa, Hitler's June 1941 massive invasion of the Soviet Union, until his disappearance, with most of Army Group Center, in June 1944. Roth proves to be an intelligence, observant, and talented writer, capturing for his journals all the essential elements of war on the Eastern Front. In three months his 14,000 division, experiencing constant Red Army artillery and air attacks, is attributed and reduced to some 6,000 men. Replenished with reinforcements, Roth finds himself and his unit being used a fire brigade all along the Eastern Front. It is clear that he imbibed Hitler's anti-Semitism and believed in Nazi Germany's wars against Soviet Russia, based on his comments about Jews and Bolsheviks. In the end, Roth's 299th Infantry Division, like the rest of the Wehrmacht, were overwhelmed by Red Army infantry divisions, tank brigades, and air force squadrons that never stopped attacking the German soldiers.

This book is so perfect a memoir that it caused me to wonder whether its was all really true - or fiction. This proved to be the case with another powerful memoir of the Eastern Front "The Forgotten Soldier", which was later revealed to be fictitious. However, the accompany photographs and documents at the end lend great credibility to one of the best German Eastern Front memoirs I have ever read.

"Eastern Inferno" is highly recommended for anyone interested in infantry warfare on the Eastern Front, the German Wehrmacht, and the Red Army.
Skyway Skyway
Sometimes history is presented in such a general manner that end results often overshadow the reality of events that lead to those results; this often leads to misperceptions, dare I say "myths", regarding what really happened. World War II is rife with such generalizations, especially the conflict between Germany and the Soviet Union, where four bitter years of brutality are often summarized in only a few sentences. But, occasionally, a lone voice emerges that can provide an honest and refreshing view of events and even contradict popular belief by providing a first-hand, moment-by-moment account of events as they happened ... EASTERN INFERNO is such an example.

As the men and women who survived World War II rapidly vanish from the world's population, new information, stories and details of the war continues to flow at an exponential rate. Christine Alexander and Mason Kunze have published three (of possibly four) volumes of their grandfather Hans Roth's wartime journal. Roth, a German soldier (specifically an anti-tank soldier) who participated in the war on the Eastern Front from the initial German invasion of the Soviet Union through the retreat from Stalingrad, provides a unique perspective of those early days of the conflict. Unflinching and brutal at times, the journal sheds new light on the initial months of the "war in the East" by contradicting the ease of the German advance into the Soviet Union. Roth also conveys the deplorable conditions in which the war was fought, the atrocities committed by both sides of the conflict, the unfathomable destruction of life and material, the filth and the miserable weather. What the journals reveal are the inner thoughts of an ordinary German, not an ardent Nazi, who dutifully serves his country, but longs to be home with his wife and daughter.

EASTERN INFERNO is divided into three chapters and each chapter represents one volume of Hans Roth's journal. The journal entries are recorded daily with some days being more eventful, descriptive and involved while others are only a sentence or two of personal thoughts about his family. Roth's knack for detail sets an early tone for the book, allowing the reader to witness the life of the typical German soldier in those "heady" early days when the German blitzkrieg seemed unstoppable. It only took a few pages before I realized Roth had taken me alongside him on that hot and humid day in June 1941 with his descriptive journal entries ... and this is exactly the experience I want when reading about first-hand accounts. I could easily imagine the dust clouds created by moving vehicles sticking to the sweaty faces and hands of exhausted infantrymen moving to the front lines under the oppressive sun ... uncomfortable and miserable. Something else the reader will notice early-on is that this soldier's account of participating in the invasion of the Soviet Union does not necessarily jive with the broad, generic summary of events that commonly defines Operation Barbarossa. While the huge swaths of land consumed by the German military and the enormous tally of prisoners taken in the initial weeks/months are well-documented, Roth's experience at the front indicates the Soviet military put up a much more spirited fight than history typically generalizes. With continuing accounts of his comrades being killed or wounded, Roth even reveals a degree of respect toward the Soviet enemy for his tenacity ... as well as his skill. But beneath this begrudging respect reveals the underlying element of Nazi racial indoctrination in that he is shocked that the Russian "swine" could manage to fight as effectively as they could. An early account of witnessing an execution at the hands of the SS is recounted with relative indifference.

The journey that Roth takes the reader on is a brutal one filled with fear, death and misery and he meticulously details his observations in a manner that heightens the readers senses into what he actually experienced. The exuberant and optimistic tone present in the first third of the book dissipates as the war drags on and the tides shifts against Germany. Harassed by partisans that melt in and out of the forests and daily strafing attacks by Soviet planes (Ratas), the journal entries reflect a souring of optimism. As a brutal winter sets in, Roth's writings reveal that he and his comrades are a shell of their former selves ... the prior year's youthful enthusiasm is gone ... instead, the men are filthy, infested with lice and suffering from dysentery. Roth effectively describes this sense of despair he shares with his fellow soldiers as they squat in dingy panje huts to escape the deadly cold where the men turn to searching for and destroying lice as a game. Adding to the strain is that the enemy never stops attacking ... regardless of their losses. Roth even witnesses the Soviets murdering their own soldiers after retreating from a failed attack. A recurring theme in many of the journal entries is the gore and mass devastation he sees on a daily basis: his journey into Russia is a path filled with body parts, blood and decaying flesh of man and horses ... many, many horses.

Interspersed throughout his journal entries, Roth personally addresses his wife and daughter in what appears to be little moments of solace amid a world of death and destruction. There is no heroic action accounted for, no chest-thumping and no resounding political rhetoric that comes forth in his writing ... just a simple journal of what is seen and felt.

EASTERN INFERNO provides an amazing perspective of the average German infantryman's personal experience in Russia from the very beginning of the conflict ... as it happened. Roth's journal entries are vividly clear, informative and captivating. Hopefully, the publishing of this engaging journal will not only satiate those with a craving for history, but generate an interest in younger generations to learn more of about the brutal conflict between the Soviet Union and Germany.
Nuadora Nuadora
This book describes war on the eastern front of WW2 from the point of view of the "frontschweine" (front pigs), a description of which the German soldiers were inordinately proud. The author, Hans Roth, writes his journal in simple but effective, style. Despite being faced by superior numbers they believed in themselves being able to fight and win in most situations. Never mind facing death from enemy actions, the conditions in which they lived, for example waterlogged trenches, poor clothing, sometimes poor, or even no, food, the lack of adequate rest, and transport difficulties, show just how tough and long-suffering these soldiers were. The author describes his love for his family in his journal, which comes to an end in 1944, when he went missing. An interesting point is that the author hardly ever mentions Hitler or National Socialism, but he indicates that he fights for his country.
Efmprof Efmprof
This journal gives a graphic description of the savage warfare between the Soviets and the Germans. It certainly rings true as I compare it to other books on this subject. This is the only book period, where this soldiers account of rounding up the Jews in the Ukraine by the SS squads and where just machined gunned down, men, women, and children. This soldier describes it in a matter of fact way although it seemed to be disagreeable to him(not enough to protest though). I am willing to bet that if he lived that after the war this would have been edited out. The book does leave the things up in the air as he apparently was killed sometime in 1944. For readers on this area of conflict the journal describes the battles and daily life on the front very well.
Thanks Doc Rich