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eBook The Last Kaiser: The Life of Wilhelm II ePub

eBook The Last Kaiser: The Life of Wilhelm II ePub

by Giles MacDonogh

  • ISBN: 0312276737
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Giles MacDonogh
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; 1st edition (August 31, 2001)
  • Pages: 544
  • ePub book: 1275 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1108 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf lit doc
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 228

Description

Wilhelm II played a significant role in the events that led to the First World Wa.

Wilhelm II played a significant role in the events that led to the First World War. My hope was to learn who Kaiser Wilhelm II was as a person and how his actions were shaped by his personality. The book's endless details don't begin to reveal anything that comes close to such revelations. You would be wise to skip this book. Unfortunately, while this book may be a scholarly success, it is not a particularly good read.

Giles MacDonogh (born 1955) is a British writer, historian and translator. MacDonogh has worked as a journalist, most notably for the Financial Times (1988–2003), where he covered food, drink and a variety of other subjects

Giles MacDonogh (born 1955) is a British writer, historian and translator. MacDonogh has worked as a journalist, most notably for the Financial Times (1988–2003), where he covered food, drink and a variety of other subjects. He has also contributed to most of the other important British newspapers, and is a regular contributor to The Times. As an historian, MacDonogh concentrates on central Europe, principally Germany.

The Last Kaiser book. Germany's last kaiser was born in Potsdam on January 27, 1859, the. In this fascinating, authoritative new life, MacDonogh, widely praised for his biography of Frederick the Great, takes a fresh look at this complex, contradictory statesman and the charges against him to find that many of them can no longer be upheld.

Originally published: The last Kaiser : William the Impetuous. In this authoritative new biography, MacDonogh, widely praised for his life of Frederick the Great, takes a fresh look at this complex and contradictory statesman and the charges against him to find that many can no longer be upheld.

The Last Kaiser : The Life of Wilhelm II. by Giles MacDonogh. Germany's last kaiser was born in Potsdam on January 27, 1859, the son of Prince Frederick of Prussia and Princess Vicky, Queen Victoria's eldest child. William was born with a withered arm--possibly the result of cerebral palsy--and many historians have sought in this a clue to his behavior in later life. He was believed mad by some, eccentric by others.

I am also curious about "The Last Kaiser: The Life of Wilhelm II" by Giles MacDonogh. Durand, MacDonogh's book is very good,highly recommended

I am also curious about "The Last Kaiser: The Life of Wilhelm II" by Giles MacDonogh. Has anyone read this book or any others by this author? Best Regards, Durand. Durand, MacDonogh's book is very good,highly recommended.

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for further reading: The Last Kaiser: The Life of Wilhelm II by Giles MacDonogh. The Kaiser's Memoirs by Wilhelm II, German Emperor

for further reading: The Last Kaiser: The Life of Wilhelm II by Giles MacDonogh. The Kaiser's Memoirs by Wilhelm II, German Emperor. Wilhelm II: Into the Abyss of War and Exile, 1900–1941 by John C. G. Röhl. 345 views · Answer requested by. Max Austin.

Prussia's last king and Germany's last Kaiser was born in Potsdam on January 27, 1859, the son of Prince Frederick of Prussia and Princess Vicky, Queen Victoria's eldest child. William was born with a withered arm and suffered from cerebral palsy; many historians have sought in this clue a clue to his behavior later in life. He was believed mad by some, eccentric by others. Possessed of a ferocious temper, he was prone to reactionary statements, often contradicted by his next action or utterance. He was rumored to have sired numerous illegitimate children and yet was by all appearances a prig. A severe Calvinist tutor brought him up, but his entourage spoiled him, allowing him to win at games an maneuvers to compensate for his deformities. This gave him a sense of inherent invincibility.William became Kaiser at age twenty-nine. Two years later, he drove Bismarck out after the latter had blocked his social policy. He destabilized the Iron Chancellor's foreign policy by failing to renew the Reinsurance Treaty with Russia, a decision that opened the way for Russia's alliance with France in 1894. He denied that the fleet he built was targeted at Britain, but there is evidence that German domination of the seas was the aim of William's secretary of state, who was altogether less anxious to please the British than the grandson of Queen Victoria. William idolized the Queen. As soon as he heard she was dying, he rushed to Osbourne House to be at her bedside. his own daughter later said, "The Queen of England died in the arms of the German Kaiser."William II is widely perceived as a warmonger who seemed to delight in power grabbing, blood-shed, and the belligerent aims of his staff, yet the image he carved out for himself and posterity was that of "emperor of peace." William has historically been blamed for World War I, although he made real efforts to prevent the conflict. he has been branded an anti-Semite, but ironically the Nazis wrote him off as a "Jew-lover." In this fascinating, authoritative new biography, MacDonogh, widely praised for his life of Frederick the Great, takes a fresh look at this complex and contradictory statesmen and the charges against him to find that a=many can no longer be upheld.

Comments

Arashitilar Arashitilar
I've given this book one star only because I cannot give it no stars. 462 pages of paragraphs filled with sentences strung end-to-end, frequently having little to nothing to do with the prior or the following sentences. The book largely reads as a listing of the activities from the Kaiser's daily calendar. And at that, it's very poorly edited. I can't imagine why or how the publisher ever allowed the book to be printed.
Wilhelm II played a significant role in the events that led to the First World War. My hope was to learn who Kaiser Wilhelm II was as a person and how his actions were shaped by his personality . The book's endless details don't begin to reveal anything that comes close to such revelations.
You would be wise to skip this book.
Āłł_Ÿøūrš Āłł_Ÿøūrš
This purchase was actually a replacement copy as I gave away my original book to a good friend. I've noticed over the years that some very knowledgeable readers have expressed disappointment with this book. In my humble opinion however this beefy 500 page hardback covers Wilhelm's life from beginning to end in a fairly easy to read narrative. I find it personally difficult to muster much sympathy for this wayward child of the popular Kaiser Friedrich-III (Fritz) and his wife: Princess Victoria (Daughter of Britain's Queen Victoria). In a nutshell "The Last Kaiser" is a well written volume that makes use of an easy to follow writing style and a handful of photographs to tell the turbulent story of the collapse of The German Empire and its less than loved Emperor.
Gavirim Gavirim
Not only should a great biography of an important world leader be well researched and historically accurate, but in order to have any appeal beyond scholastic circles it should also be entertaining and bring the subject to life. In order to achieve this delicate balance, an author must carefully review the voluminous historical record and cull the mundane and marginally relevant details from those that provide real interest and insight. I can't speak authoritatively on the subject, but it is clear that Giles MacDonogh has exhaustively studied the life of Kaiser Wilhelm II. Both original sources in the form of personal letters and first hand accounts and later critical examinations of Wilhelm are well represented. Unfortunately, while this book may be a scholarly success, it is not a particularly good read. The subject is compelling, but MacDonogh's pedantic rendition never fully engages the lay reader. Wilhelm is one of the most contradictory and controversial leaders of the 2th century, but this book never really gives you a sense of his personality or his relationships with others. Instead of really delving into the heart and soul of his subject, MacDonogh produces a dry litany of historical facts. The only personal aspect of the kaiser that MacDonogh tries to address in any depth is his anti-semitism, but even here he is not completely successful.
Rishason Rishason
Gile MacDonogh has produced an interesting new look at Kaiser Wilhelm II. The writing is not scintillating, and there are some ridiculous errors (The Tsar-Liberator was Alexander II, not Nicholas II). The editing leaves a lot to be desired, too, as there are some sentences which don't make sense unless you figure out that there are some words missing here and there.
Be that as it may, the book is nevertheless well worth your time. MacDonogh takes a different attitude than most about the Kaiser's damaged arm, pointing out that he was able to cope successfully with the handicap throughout a long life and that it was not necessarily psychologically damaging. MacDonogh also takes another view of Wilhelm's parents, Kaiser Frederick III and Victoria, Princess Royal of Britain. Most of their previous biographers have made "Fritz" and "Vicky" out as heroes determined to make Germany a liberal, democratic nation. MacDonogh underscores Fritz's weaknesses and penchant for pomp and Vicky's cold and demanding nature.
MacDonogh also illuminates Wilhelm's role as a surprisingly progressive ruler. The Kaiser was one of the first to speak of a United States of Europe and the need to let down customs barriers, eighty years before such ideas became fashionable. At the same time Wilhelm was advocating these reforms, unfortunately, he was also pushing Germany's imperialistic and militaristic policies until they became an open challenge to Great Britain and led to World War I.
One of the most interesting parts of the book is the section dealing with Wilhelm's exile in Doorn, Holland. It seems the ex-Kaiser may have grown up a little once he was out of the spotlight, refusing to deal with the Nazis, for example, and reducing some of his braggadocio.
So, despite the shortcomings of the writing and editorial processes, this is a worthwhile addition to your library.
Pedora Pedora
Very detailed, good book.
Aiata Aiata
Good biography about man who treated his parents Fritz and Vicky very poorly but was with his grandmother Queen Victoria when she died.His belligerent and bellicose nature did nothing to quell emotions and tempers in the period prior to the outbreak of World War I.His physical deformities really messed him up as a child from which he never recovered and which plagued him with self doubt and anger. The book was very balanced in its treatment of him and attempts to remove the generally accepted position that he was largely responsible for the First World War.
Darkraven Darkraven
Great read!
Although this book didn't get good reviews by people more knowledgeable on the subject, I did find it interesting, being the first book I've read about Wilhelm, though I've read a fair amount about the era.