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eBook Sherman: The Ruthless Victor (Generals) ePub

eBook Sherman: The Ruthless Victor (Generals) ePub

by Ed Breslin,Agostino Von Hassell

  • ISBN: 1595551336
  • Category: Leaders and Notable People
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Ed Breslin,Agostino Von Hassell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson Inc; 1st edition (October 11, 2011)
  • Pages: 169
  • ePub book: 1893 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1400 kb
  • Other: azw lit docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 922

Description

And in "Sherman: The Ruthless Victor" Agostino von Hassell and Ed Breslin reveal the steel and brilliance of Sherman's career as the reader learns many essential lessons which apply to the current state of the world and to contemporary warfare.

And in "Sherman: The Ruthless Victor" Agostino von Hassell and Ed Breslin reveal the steel and brilliance of Sherman's career as the reader learns many essential lessons which apply to the current state of the world and to contemporary warfare. Sherman pressed the pitiless abuse of economic necessities as he implemented the distressing aspects of war; this wrought enormous pain in his March through Georgia; nonetheless it may have helped save countless lives as it hastened the end of the war.

Authors Agostino Von Hassell and Ed Breslin present Sherman as once . This book is one in a series, The Generals, published by Thomas Nelson.

Authors Agostino Von Hassell and Ed Breslin present Sherman as once man and phenomenon. From Bull Run to Shiloh, from Vicksburg to Chattanooga, and from Atlanta to Savannah, Sherman carved the Confederacy with a feral singularity of purpose. But, I found Sherman: The Ruthless Victor to be more than a little troubling for what really amounts to just a few sentences in a 163 page book.

Sherman : The Ruthless Victor. Part of the The Generals Series). by Agostino von Hassell and Ed Breslin. He was named after an enemy of the United States. He was proslavery despite his loyalty to the Union

Sherman : The Ruthless Victor. He was proslavery despite his loyalty to the Union. He burned and pillaged an already beaten foe on a march history will never forget. If, as he famously said, "war is hell," William Tecumsah Sherman can be classified as a flamethrower of ruthless ferocity. At times disheveled and informal to a fault, Uncle Billy became a hero whose legend only grew with allegations of villainy. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. At times disheveled and informal to a fault, "Uncle Billy" became a hero whose legend only grew with allegations of villainy.

Sherman: The Ruthless Victor. With indecision a common ailment among Union generals early the conflict, Sherman's temperment and unwavering focus on the mission at hand-preserving the Union-helped shift the fortunes of North and South. Authors Agostino Von Hassell and Ed Breslin present Sherman as once man and phenomenon.

This time around, I read Sherman: The Ruthless Victor

This time around, I read Sherman: The Ruthless Victor. Again, I loved it. However, I have to say that I’m not a big fan of William Tecumseh Sherman.

Agostino Von Hassell Ed Breslin16. Sherman: The Ruthless Victor. Agostino Von Hassell. Verkauft von Thomas Nelson. Zum Hörbuch wechseln. Agostino von Hassell spent his formative years in the United States, studying European History at Columbia University, graduating with a . He then attended Columbia Journalism School, graduating with awards in 1975. He is the president of The Repton Group LLC. Hassell has extensive expertise in national security matters, high-level investigations around the globe, terrorism and military issues and global trade problems. Weitere Informationen.

General Sherman is a giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) tree located in the Giant Forest of Sequoia National Park in Tulare County, in the . By volume, it is the largest known living single-stem tree on Earth. While the General Sherman is the largest currently living tree, it is not the largest historically recorded tree.

He was named after an enemy of the United States.

He was proslavery despite his loyalty to the Union. He burned and pillaged an already beaten foe on a march history will never forget.

If, as he famously said, "war is hell," William Tecumsah Sherman can be classified as a flamethrower of ruthless ferocity. Defined by his contradictions, Sherman achieved immortality in his role as Ulysses Grant's hammer in the Civil War. A failed banker and lawyer, Sherman found his calling with the outbreak of war in 1861. With indecision a common ailment among Union generals early the conflict, Sherman's temperment and unwavering focus on the mission at hand-preserving the Union-helped shift the fortunes of North and South.

Authors Agostino Von Hassell and Ed Breslin present Sherman at once man and phenomenon. From Bull Run to Shiloh, from Vicksburg to Chattanooga, and from Atlanta to Savannah, Sherman carved the Confederacy with a feral singularity of purpose. At times disheveled and informal to a fault, "Uncle Billy" became a hero whose legend only grew with allegations of villainy.

Comments

Zeueli Zeueli
If a person is looking for a short read - wanting to know who he was, where & how he became the most celebrated Civil War leader then look no further then this book. The narrative moves along without bogging down in too much detail. It is my view that the author gives just enough to keep you turning the pages and is fair and balanced in his writings. Sherman was vilified by the south yet admired and loved by the north. “Total War “ was what he believed in and that was what the south got. This book is a worthy read.
Thetath Thetath
Great book, great series.I have read all of these biographies and this series is as good as it gets.
Easy reading and very informative
Qwne Qwne
Fffffgggg
Lianeni Lianeni
Whets the appetite for a more comprehensive biography.
CrazyDemon CrazyDemon
**This book was provided to me free by Thomas Nelson Publishing, in return for the very forthright review I shall now give.**

When I finished reading my last book through Thomas Nelson's Booksneeze program, I decided I would choose another in their series of short biographies on American generals. I enjoyed the first of them I'd read, so this seemed a pretty safe bet for a decent read. And yet, there should perhaps have been warning bells going off in my head from the moment I read the subtitle. Perjorative terms like "ruthless" aren't usually whipped out THAT early in the game! Still, I knew to what the authors were referring--Sherman's infamous "burning of Atlanta" and "march to the sea," which were the 19th-century equivalent of the "firebombing of Dresden" during World War II. Everyone pretty much agrees that Sherman's actions were short on military justification and long on overkill, so I just figured the authors were making clear up front that this book was not going to glorify Sherman for those events. Well, it certainly doesn't glorify him!

Those belated alarm bells did start *bonging* quite stridently as soon as I turned to the first page of the Introduction. One of the primary things upon which a good biography depends is creating some sort of rapport between the reader and the biographer's subject. Since the writer is recounting historical events, some attempt at objectivity is expected, but books of this type usually have some shards of sympathy in dealing with the person under study. Not this one. The authors' primary goal seems to be to unite readers with them in loathing and disdaining William Tecumseh Sherman.

I have known of Sherman's exploits in the deep South during the Civil War for many years, so I was never very fond of the man. By the time I finished this book, however, I had become so weary with hearing him denigrated that I found myself becoming one of his most vocal defenders! Page after exhausting page of insults, insinuations and diatribes against him left me with far greater distaste for the authors than for the general.

Time and again, words like "white supremacist" are bandied about, with seemingly no recognition that Sherman simply held the views typical of his time and place, repugnant though they are to a modern reader. The biographers imply more than once that Sherman was mentally unbalanced and descended from a long line of insanity. He is accused of "gratuitous pyromania," being a man of "shallow" "emotional depth," "acute misanthropy," "elitist contempt for 'commoners'," and of "feeling ... sorry for himself" after a Union loss in battle and thinking solely of how the setback would affect his career. He was supposedly "calculating," "[e]gotistical and narcissistic," "wallowing in self-pity" when suffering from depression and anxiety issues, "incapable of withstanding any criticism," "self-congratulatory," "petulant," and given to outbursts of "despotic absolutism". If that list felt unnecessarily long, and you were thinking to yourself halfway through it, "Ok! We get the point! Get on with it already," then I have done my job as a reviewer in giving you the exact experience of reading this book without you having to do so. You can now make up your mind whether or not you think it's worth the time, effort and money to acquire it.

With all that having been said, you may be wondering why I didn't give this book the lowest possible rating. The answer is simple. During the section when the authors were discussing historical events of the Civil War, taking a break from belittling Sherman, I actually learned some interesting things. If there had been a great deal more emphasis on the great conflict throughout the book, it would have been a fascinating read. Also, I always feel that a book has had some merit in my life if it instills curiosity in me to read other books. This one certainly made me want to read some other biographies of Sherman, to see how he fares under another's pen.
Daizil Daizil
Book review: Sherman - a ruthless victor by A. von Hassell and E. Breslin
Since I am history buff and have read books about the Civil War long before the Ken Burns series came to PBS, I selected this book about Sherman. I should start off with the disclaimer that I approach each book open minded and have enjoyed books about the Civil War that can be construed to favor the North and the South, as long the facts check out and the interpretation of the events and sources can be backed up by facts, I acknowledge that each author approaches the topic of the Civil War with their own bias and that is fine with me. I just hope to learn some new facets about the era and the people in it.
This book by von Hassell and Breslin is not the typical book that I read about the Civil War. Two things set this book apart. It is a relatively short book, only 163 pages. The second fact is that it has more religious statements in it than my usual reading material. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the book. It provided some interesting tidbits about the man that Sherman was. There are no references attached to the book, so fact checkers are out of luck and need to look elsewhere for confirmation. But the book overall presents a nice insight into the complex character that Sherman was. The drive to excel, while at the same time harboring deep doubts about his military ability. The difficult upbringing of Sherman the foster child that may in part explain his drive to convince others that he was able to succeed.
The book did present insights into Sherman's character that were unexpected, the differences on religion between him and his wife. The relationship with Grant that was difficult at times and the constant fear of failing or having another nervous breakdowns that could derail his career. Sherman was a complex character and despite the rather brief insight provided in this book, the authors understand well to make the book interesting and provide insights for all readers, no matter what their familiarity with the Civil War may be.
This book is not for people that want an overview of battles and military strategy. Although any book about Sherman will have some insights into his military style. Battles are mentioned, but almost in passing since the authors clearly focus on the personality of Sherman.
Overall, an enjoyable book about one of the major players in the Civil War with some interesting insights into
his person.