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eBook Come Up and Get Me: An Autobiography of Colonel Joe Kittinger ePub

eBook Come Up and Get Me: An Autobiography of Colonel Joe Kittinger ePub

by Neil Armstrong,Joe Kittinger

  • ISBN: 0826348033
  • Category: Leaders and Notable People
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Neil Armstrong,Joe Kittinger
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of New Mexico Press (June 16, 2010)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1710 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1810 kb
  • Other: azw rtf docx lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 706

Description

I first met Joe and Sherry Kittinger at the 1998 National Aviation Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony, the year . Kittinger doesn't stop there as the book describes many of the balloon records he still holds after he retired from the Military.

I first met Joe and Sherry Kittinger at the 1998 National Aviation Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony, the year after Joe had been inducted into the Hall and the year Joe presented his friend and mentor, Col. John Paul Stapp, for enshrinement. We have been friends since, so I had heard many of the stories told in Come Up and Get Me over the years and some beers. This is a great Biography but it seems like it's written by a test pilot, which Kittinger was, and there seems to be a lack of emotion in the book.

Kittinger's work on Project Excelsior - which involved daring high-altitude bailout tests - earned him the Distinguished Flying Cross long before he earned a collection of medals in Vietnam. Despite the many accolades, Kittinger's proudest moment remains his free fall from 102,800 feet during which he achieved a speed of 614 miles per hour.

Colonel Joseph William Kittinger II (born July 27, 1928) is a retired officer in the United States Air Force .

Colonel Joseph William Kittinger II (born July 27, 1928) is a retired officer in the United States Air Force (USAF) and a Command Pilot. Come Up and Get Me: An Autobiography of Colonel Joe Kittinger; Ryan, Craig and Kittinger, Joseph; University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, NM; c2010; ISBN 9780826348043

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Come Up and Get Me: An. .A few years after his release from a North Vietnamese prisoner-of-war camp in 1973, Colonel Joseph Kittinger retired from the Air Force.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Come Up and Get Me: An Autobiography of Colonel Joe Kittinger" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Restless and unchallenged, he turned to ballooning, a lifelong passion as well as a constant diversion for his imagination during his imprisonment. His primary goal was a solitary circumnavigation of the globe, and in its pursuit he set several ballooning distance records, including the first solo crossing of the Atlantic in 1984.

Colonel Kittinger has three life stories in here at least, all of them interesting, and he's not done ye. This was a book given to me by my grandfather. It took me awhile to open it up and read it; I wish I had t waited so long.

This was a book given to me by my grandfather. Even now, it’s been 6 months since I’ve completed it, and I still feel bad about leaving it closed so long. I can’t remember all that much, but I do remember enjoying this story of a man who starts in the military and works his way to his biggest dreams and facing some big fears. A jump from a height unknown to 99% of mankind leaves me speechless.

In this long-awaited autobiography, Kittinger joins author Craig Ryan to document an astonishing career. Selected by Popular Mechanics as a Top Book of 2010. University of New Mexico Press.

A few years after his release from a North Vietnamese prisoner-of-war camp in 1973, Colonel Joseph Kittinger retired from the Air Force

A few years after his release from a North Vietnamese prisoner-of-war camp in 1973, Colonel Joseph Kittinger retired from the Air Force.

Joe Kittinger, Craig Ryan. A few years after his release from a North Vietnamese prisoner-of-war camp in 1973 Colonel Joseph Kittinger retired from the Air Force. Restless and unchallenged, he turned to ballooning, a life-long passion as well as a constant diversion for his imagination during his imprisonment. His primary goal was a solitary circumnavigation of the globe, and in its pursuit he set several ballooning distance records, including the first solo crossing of the Atlantic in 1984

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Бойня СуперКрепостей B-29: могила ВВС США! Воздушное сражение над рекой Ялуцзян Корея 1951 год. 27:11. 9 أفكار وإختراعات إبداعية يمكنك عملها في المنزل Top 9 genius ideas l - Продолжительность: 15:49 ورشة محمد - Workshop Recommended for you.

A few years after his release from a North Vietnamese prisoner-of-war camp in 1973, Colonel Joseph Kittinger retired from the Air Force. Restless and unchallenged, he turned to ballooning, a lifelong passion as well as a constant diversion for his imagination during his imprisonment. His primary goal was a solitary circumnavigation of the globe, and in its pursuit he set several ballooning distance records, including the first solo crossing of the Atlantic in 1984. But the aeronautical feats that first made him an American hero had occurred a quarter of a century earlier.

By the time Kittinger was shot down in Vietnam in 1972, his Air Force career was already legendary. He had made a name for himself at Holloman Air Force Base near Alamogordo, New Mexico, as a test pilot who helped demonstrate that egress survival for pilots at high altitudes was possible in emergency situations. Ironically, Kittinger and his pre-astronaut colleagues would help propel Americans into space using the world's oldest flying machine--the balloon. Kittinger's work on Project Excelsior--which involved daring high-altitude bailout tests--earned him the Distinguished Flying Cross long before he earned a collection of medals in Vietnam. Despite the many accolades, Kittinger's proudest moment remains his free fall from 102,800 feet during which he achieved a speed of 614 miles per hour.

In this long-awaited autobiography, Kittinger joins author Craig Ryan to document an astonishing career.

Selected by Popular Mechanics as a Top Book of 2010

Comments

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Come Up and Get Me: An Autobiography of Colonel Joseph Kittinger

In Come Up and Get Me, Joe Kittinger calls Col. John Paul Stapp the bravest man he ever met. The bravest man I have ever met is Joe Kittinger. "Col. Joe," Air Force test pilot, Air Force fighter pilot, Vietnam POW, balloonist extraordinaire, world's-record-holding parachutist, barnstormer, even alligator hunter! To say they don't make lives like this anymore is grossly understating the case. Joe's life and his devotion to flying began in what's become known as "the golden age" of aviation, a time when airplanes came with at least two wings, big piston engines, and big wooden propellers up front. It was a time when young boys dreamed of adventure and acted on those dreams. Joe left Florida for Air Force flight training with a couple years of college and a few private flights under his belt. Eventually he landed in test pilot work assisting Col. Stapp in developing high-altitude survival equipment and procedures, the stuff the U.S. would need to win the space race. That assignment led to Project Excelsior, Joe's record-breaking balloon ascent, parachute jump, and free fall, all records that still stand--though they might fall later this year with Joe's help. The summer of 1960 would have provided more than enough excitement for most men, but Joe hadn't yet experienced aerial combat and a strong sense of duty led him to Vietnam and command of the Triple-Nickel Tactical Fighter Squadron. Joe's command came to an end over North Vietnam courtesy of a Mig and a missile that landed Joe in the Hanoi Hilton for eleven months of torture, near starvation, and many other indignities that Joe probably felt too horrific to recount. Since his release, Col. Joe has lived the good life of a barnstormer and balloon pilot, continuing to set records racing and sailing across the Atlantic--the first to do it solo.

I first met Joe and Sherry Kittinger at the 1998 National Aviation Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony, the year after Joe had been inducted into the Hall and the year Joe presented his friend and mentor, Col. John Paul Stapp, for enshrinement. We have been friends since, so I had heard many of the stories told in Come Up and Get Me over the years and some beers. Nevertheless, Joe's humility and humor kept me moving through the pages of what is an incredibly engaging story, told by a man everyone will come to know as the bravest they've ever met.
Gathris Gathris
When one mentions the names Glenn, Carpenter, Armstrong, Shepard we all know who they are and for good reason but mention Kittinger, Stapp and Simons and no one knows who they are, and yet, these were the pioneers that put their lives on the line as they pushed to escape planet earth and become the early pioneers of space exploration. When you tell your friends that someone went to 20 miles above the earth in a balloon, fell in free fall at terminal velocity near the speed of sound, then used a largely untested parachute they look in disbelieve especially when you tell them that the person survived. This was just one of many of those great moments in Kittingers life.

I have read all of Craig Ryan's books and for the most part they are incredibly well written with enough detail to interest both the ordinary reader and the scientist. I also have a copy of "The Long, Lonely Leap" which Kittinger wrote with Martin Caidin in 1961. Kittinger has, for a number of years, been one of my heroes ever since I saw that famous picture on the front of USA Today many years ago. I still wonder how I could not have known about this man and we have to thank Craig Ryan for giving Kittingers achievements more visibility in the US history of Space.

So it was with great anticipation that I ordered this book because much of Kittingers later life and achievements were not too familiar to me and this book promised to complete that picture. In terms of courage, there are few that can match this man who seems to have a passion for volunteering for any "mission impossible" that includes going to Vietnam as a fighter pilot, getting shot down, captured and held prisoner. Kittinger doesn't stop there as the book describes many of the balloon records he still holds after he retired from the Military.

This is a great Biography but it seems like it's written by a test pilot, which Kittinger was, and there seems to be a lack of emotion in the book. It is a great factual account but I wanted to know about his real feelings, his marriage to his first wife and why it failed? How do his kids see him and what did he do to influence them in their lives? How does someone, who has to maintain a level of unemotional logic in his work, live in the family environment. Kittinger makes reference to his family many times and the regret of not being with them enough. The Biography suddenly states that his marriage broke up and was dissolved and moves on. Of course one could say "it's none of your business" as it's a personal issue but that's what good biography's are about. They help us understand the person. Ryan does the same thing in his account of the love affair between Simons and Otto Winzen's wife in his book "The pre Astronauts" Kittinger remembers the smallest details in terms of his work life but we don't get any insight into the Kittinger family. I guess many of the characters in his life are still alive and some things may need to be kept private but give us something!

Someone, and Craig Ryan is probably the right person, needs to write the screen play for the Kittinger story. It's a wonderful story of courage, human endurance and the unwillingness to accept the status quo.

I do recommend this book but it leaves me wanting to know more about the emotions of the man who "fell to earth".

gdollar
Cetnan Cetnan
Colonel Joe Kittinger's story is an amazing tale which will make you proud to be an American. This book follows Kittinger from his early days in Florida to his efforts to become (against the odds) a fighter pilot to his breathtaking parachute jump from the edge of space. Kittinger was a volunteer... he volunteered to be a guinea pig at a time when we needed to know how to protect astronauts and airmen at high altitude, he volunteered to jump from a balloon at over 100,000 feet (and set a record which still stands today) and he volunteered for tours in Vietnam.

And he wound up as a POW in Hanoi. And despite the cruel and mindless punishment of his communist captors he and his fellow inmates emerged as men of honor.

This book is better than any work of fiction. Well worth getting.