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eBook Civil War Stories (Georgia Southern University Jack N. and Addie D. Averitt Lecture Ser.) ePub

eBook Civil War Stories (Georgia Southern University Jack N. and Addie D. Averitt Lecture Ser.) ePub

by Catherine Clinton

  • ISBN: 0820320749
  • Category: Leaders and Notable People
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Catherine Clinton
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press (September 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 144
  • ePub book: 1510 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1732 kb
  • Other: lrf lit azw mobi
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 712

Description

Perdue places the exhibition in broad historical context.

Perdue places the exhibition in broad historical context. Series: Georgia Southern University Jack N. and Addie D. Averitt Lecture Ser. (Book 16). Paperback: 220 pages.

Catherine Clinton's Civil War Stories is an excellent illustration of Garrett's point. Clinton's slim but engaging volume collects three lectures she presented in 1996 for the seventh annual Jack N. and Addie Averitt Lecture Series at Georgia Southern University

Catherine Clinton's Civil War Stories is an excellent illustration of Garrett's point. and Addie Averitt Lecture Series at Georgia Southern University.

Invisible Southerners book. Hardcover, 112 pages. Published May 1st 2006 by University of Georgia Press. Most Southerners who fought in the Civil War were native born, white, and Confederate. However, thousands with other ethnic backgrounds also took a stand-and not always for the South. Invisible Southerners recounts the wartime experiences of the region's German Americans, Native Americans, and African Americans.

Series: Georgia Southern University Jack N. Averitt Lecture Series. What we learn will reattune us to the complexities and ironies of nationalism. Published by: University of Georgia Press. During his travels around southern Italy not long ago, Doyle was caught off guard by frequent images of the Confederate battle flag. The flag could also be seen, he was told, waving in the stands at soccer matches. At the same time, a political movement in northern Italy called for secession from the South.

Catherine Clinton holds the Denman Chair of American History at the University of Texas in San Antonio and is Professor Emerita at Queen’s University Belfast

Catherine Clinton holds the Denman Chair of American History at the University of Texas in San Antonio and is Professor Emerita at Queen’s University Belfast Her first book, The Plantation Mistress: Woman’s World in the Old South, appeared in 1982 and was a selection of the History Book Club; her 2004 biography of Harriet Tubman, Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom, was named as one of the best non-fiction books by the Christian Science Monitor and the Chicago Tribune.

Catherine Clinton is the Denman Professor of American History at the University of Texas at San Antonio

Catherine Clinton is the Denman Professor of American History at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She specializes in American History, with an emphasis on the history of the South, the American Civil War, American women, and African American history. Clinton grew up in Kansas City, Missouri, where she graduated from the Sunset Hill School in 1969. Thereafter, she studied sociology and African-American History at Harvard University (Lowell House), graduating in 1973.

The sesquicentennial of the Civil War in 2011 looms large for Goldfield. If we can commemorate the war and celebrate southern distinctiveness without being exclusionary, then the anniversary can be an occasion for reconciliation

The sesquicentennial of the Civil War in 2011 looms large for Goldfield. If we can commemorate the war and celebrate southern distinctiveness without being exclusionary, then the anniversary can be an occasion for reconciliation. From the Publisher: A premier historian of the South looks at the region's complicated ties to its pasts.

Civil War Stories is Catherine Clinton's fresh look at some everyday and extraordinary people whose lives were forever transformed by the impact of war. Her multifaceted perspective includes the stories of sisters, children, and friends torn apart by the crisis of Confederate independence. Her multifaceted perspective includes the stories of sisters, children, and friends torn apart by the crisis of Confederate independence, as well as those to whom silence was a way to keep the peace, although true peace would never again be restored. Two sisters, one a staunch defender of the Union, the other a passionate advocate of the rebel cause, are traumatized by the divide the Civil War imposes

Most Southerners who fought in the Civil War were native born, white, and Confederate.

Most Southerners who fought in the Civil War were native born, white, and Confederate. As Anne J. Bailey looks at how such outsiders responded to demands on their loyalties, she recaptures the atmosphere of suspicion and prosecession, proslavery sentiment in which they strove to understand, and be understood by, their neighbors.

What we learn will reattune us to the complexities and ironies of nationalism.

Civil War Stories is Catherine Clinton's fresh look at some everyday and extraordinary people whose lives were forever transformed by the impact of war. Her multifaceted perspective includes the stories of sisters, children, and friends torn apart by the crisis of Confederate independence, as well as those to whom silence was a way to "keep the peace," although true peace would never again be restored.

Two sisters, one a staunch defender of the Union, the other a passionate advocate of the rebel cause, are traumatized by the divide the Civil War imposes. Thousands of orphans, scattered from Maine to New Orleans, learn the hard lessons of the war at an early age. Clinton urges us to reconsider this fatherless generation's devastating losses. The war's outcome was acrimoniously contested after Appomattox. The story of two South Carolina women, one black and one white, illuminates that fires of bitterness raged even after surrender.

Clinton suggests those on opposing sides sought to vindicate their losses and assert their rights by taking up the pen. The histories and memoirs she contrasts, the lives she reconstructs, and the stories she highlights provide appreciation of the cultural impact of the American Civil War, for those who endured it and for those of us who continue to be fascinated by its legacy.

Comments

Ballardana Ballardana
This story, while interesting from a social historian perspective, really has nothing to do with what the title implies. This story of a family divided really has nothing to do with the American Civil War. The family Clinton writes about is supposedly torn apart by the war, but that is simply not the case. Long before the war started, the family was split because the father and mother were incompatible. Though when the war started, the family was split in half, mother and one daughter living in the north while father and the other daughter lived in the south, the split occurred long before the war, and continued long afterwards. Clinton has fallen, here, into the trap that many new social historians have, that is "losing" the Civil War. It is true that these three stories occurred during the Civil War, but they cannot be rightly called "Civil War Stories". It is analougus to writing a book about the Kitty Genovese murder and calling it a Vietnam story. On top of it, Clinton is not a good writer, and the book is full of grammatical errors and incoherent sentences. Also, her writing style is not very good, and she could stand to take a few more classes in english, and history for that matter, as she gets some facts terribly wrong. I do not reccommend this book for anyone expecting a social history of women in the Civil War because it is not the case. While the story itself may be interesting to some, it does not deserve the title "Civil War Stories" and should not be presented as such.
Enditaling Enditaling
This book title seems to imply that the book will be about women/children being impacted by the civil war....what it really is, is a book about women's efforts for the South during the Civil war with a few mentions of children being left behind as orphans. When it did mention the children becoming orphans it was as a passing glance or about how one of these women would try to help find their parents or how someone started an orphanage. I was looking for a book that would give me the human side of the orphans life. Someone to tell their side of the story with the uncertaninty and chilling conditions that some of them must have lived.
That being said, this book is rich in the human history of the civil war. It does tell about some very real women who helped during the war, but most of their problems which the books seems to highlight started long before the civil war even started. I did enjoy learning about these women and it did make the civil war more peronsal....but this book is trying to be something it is not.