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eBook Winter King: The Dawn of Tudor England (Playaway Adult Nonfiction) ePub

eBook Winter King: The Dawn of Tudor England (Playaway Adult Nonfiction) ePub

by Gavin Marguerite,Thomas Penn

  • ISBN: 1455134473
  • Category: Leaders and Notable People
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Gavin Marguerite,Thomas Penn
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Findaway World (March 6, 2012)
  • ePub book: 1990 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1739 kb
  • Other: docx doc lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 119

Description

Читать онлайн - Penn Thomas. Winter King: Henry VII and the Dawn of Tudor England Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн Winter King: Henry VII and the Dawn of Tudor England.

Читать онлайн - Penn Thomas. THOMAS PENNWinter KingThe Dawn of Tudor England ALLEN LANEan imprint of PENGUIN BOOKSFor Kate ‘I love the rose both red and white

After reading Thomas Penn's Tudor England oeuvre (aka this book), I am now substantially less impressed by the imagination of. .Thomas Penn’s Winter King in a brilliant mash-up of gothic horror and political biography. David Starkey once declared Henry VII ‘boring’.

After reading Thomas Penn's Tudor England oeuvre (aka this book), I am now substantially less impressed by the imagination of George .

Henry VII can look a dull king, so dull that Thomas Penn's title omits his name Penn graphically describes a huge financial racket run by the king and his profiteering advisers. But he leaves us wondering how Henry got away with it.

Henry VII can look a dull king, so dull that Thomas Penn's title omits his name. Penn graphically describes a huge financial racket run by the king and his profiteering advisers. How did a precariously enthroned ruler, lacking a police force or a standing army, manage to run roughshod over the law?

Penn is an Englishman and lives in London

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Penn is an Englishman and lives in London. I have been motivated to read about early Tudor history after viewing the excellent series The Spanish Queen Part I on the STARZ network. Henry VII was born to Edmund Tudor and Margaret Beaufort in Wales.

Xxi, 448 . p. of plates : 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 409-428) and index

Xxi, 448 . 409-428) and index. Prologue: Red rose, avenger of the white - Blood and roses - Not a drop of doubtful royal blood - Richmond - He seeks in all places to destroy me - Now must you supply the mother's part also - Change of worlds - No sure way - Council learned - Our second.

He is best known for his 2011 biography of King Henry VII of England, Winter King: The Dawn of Tudor England, for which he won the HW Fisher Best First Biography prize and which was the subject of a 2013 BBC documentary that he presented. He is also the author of The Brothers York: An English Tragedy, published in October 2019.

Anyone who is studying the Golden Dawn system needs this volume to complete their collection. Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture. Dietary Reference Intakes. 306 Pages·2001·886 KB·21,601 Downloads·New! Since 1994, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board has been involved in developing. 53 MB·55,384 Downloads·New!

Penn, Used; Good Book -Winter King: The Dawn of Tudor England, Thomas Penn, Used; Good Book. Children's & Young Adults' Fiction Books. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- People who bought this also bought

item 7 Winter King: The Dawn of Tudor England, Thomas Penn, Used; Good Book -Winter King: The Dawn of Tudor England, Thomas Penn, Used; Good Book. See all 40. People who bought this also bought. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- People who bought this also bought. Mary Tudor: England's First Queen by Anna Whitelock (Paperback, 2010). Disney High School Musical : Book of Secrets by Parragon (Hardback, 2008).

Payne, Ann, ‘Sir Thomas Wriothesley and his Heraldic Artists’, in Michelle P. Brown and Scot McKendrick, ed. Illuminating the Book: Makers and Interpreters, Toronto, 1998, pp. 143–62

Payne, Ann, ‘Sir Thomas Wriothesley and his Heraldic Artists’, in Michelle P. 143–62. Penn, T. D, ‘Literary Service at the Court of Henry VII’, unpublished PhD dissertation, University of Cambridge, 2001.

1 Two years had passed since Henry had given Empson the duchy of Lancaster seals, and with them the informal presidency of the council learned in the law.

Rich with incident, drama, and vivid characters, this is a fresh look at the endlessly fascinating Tudors filled with spies, plots, and an uneasy succession to Henry VIII.

Comments

Blackseeker Blackseeker
I cannot say enough good about this book about Henry VII. Mr. Penn did a fabulous job peeling away the layers of Henry VII. I have not found any other book that compares when it comes to looking at Henry's life and times. I enjoyed the fact that Mr. Penn gave Henry his due and didn't just scorn him based on today's standards and moral code. Henry was obviously not an easy going King but he did help bring England together and let it heal from the War of the Roses. He was a very smart and shrewd man. By today's standards he may seem cruel and cold but he was a product of his time and of the life he was forced to lead as a possible claimant to the throne. I would highly recommend, and often do, this book to anyone interested in the life of Henry VII!
MrCat MrCat
Perhaps it's because I recently finished a fascinating biography on Edward I by Marc Morris, but I found this book to be an exhaustively boring read. First off, the author's writing style is somewhat difficult to follow; especially if English is not your native tongue. Beginning 12 years into the reign of Henry VII, the author uses comma after comma in these long-winded sentences to describe the most trivial of things. I'm no grammar expert and I'm sure that an editor deemed this to be the best style of writing for the topic at hand, but I often found myself having to reread sections in order to follow Penn's train of thought. Additionally, the book time jumps a lot. Some people probably won't mind this, but it's just my preference for historical biographies to be written chronologically. For me, chronological order makes it easier to understand and retain information. Unfortunately, this book is just all over the place.

I also found it disappointing that this book began so late in Henry VII's reign as opposed to the days after the Battle of Bosworth. This was probably the most pivotal battle in English medieval history so it would be interesting to know what happened in the days after that. Did he just call a Parliament and get to work? Why wouldn't this be included? The text does discuss the plots against Henry VII (ad nauseam, I might add), but no meaningful mention of Henry VII's installation as king. I was actually thinking about returning the book, but since it was only $9 and the cost to return is $5, it just wouldn't be worth the time (kind of like how reading this book wouldn't be worth yours).
Marilore Marilore
Henry VII was a better king than his more famous son, but if Elizabeth of York had lived, he would have been an even better one. Her death impacted him supremely, and all the worry and strife of holding onto his kingship came to the fore. Obsessed with gaining wealth, his only thought was to have enough to fight off an invasion and keep all Yorkist claimants under control. He was by far a more merciful king than his son, and to accuse him of murdering the princes in the Tower is revisionist history at its ugliest. He deserves more credit than he is given. Thomas Penn has written an excellent account of his life. His style of writing is easy and entertaining. Very enjoyable. I highly recommend it for English history buffs.
Hamrl Hamrl
Because the author crammed the book with so many extraneous characters and details even he became confused. On page 318 and again on page 331 (Kindle edition) he misidentifies the daughter of Louis XII of France as Margaret of Angoulême. Louis was married to Anne de Bretagne. They had two daughters, Claude and Réné. Because France observed the Salic Law, neither daughter could inherit the throne The crown passed to Louis's nearest male relative, Francis of Angoulême. His sister was Margaret and she thus became a princess of France as the King's sister. Francis I married Claude, bringing Brittany under French control once and for all.
Alexandra Alexandra
Mention the words "Tudor England" and what comes to mind are Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Henry VIII's other two children, Mary I and Edward VII are eclipsed by their brilliant half-sibling Elizabeth. And, by the same token, Henry VII, the founder of it all, was eclipsed by his golden son, Henry VIII (who turned out NOT to be so golden, but that's for another review).

Not much is known about the founder of the Tudor dynasty -- only that Henry's grandparents were "commoners," which wasn't 100% true, and that the only way he could truly be considered a legitimate contender to the throne was through his marriage to Elizabeth of York. Henry, a descent from the House of Lancaster (on his mother's side), effectively ended the War of the Roses, uniting Lancaster and York. But Henry VII is portrayed as a one-dimensional, dour, humorless king. Until the release of Thomas Penn's "Winter King," there was little to refute that.

But Penn breathes life into the character of Henry VII, telling the story from the Tudor king's origins, to his uncertain upbringing, to the battle at Bosworth Field where he won the right to be king of England, to the birth and upbringing of his sons and daughters. I would have liked to have seen more about young Henry's childhood -- it seemed as though the author glossed over his youth, during which he was alternately at the English court and in hiding in Brittany. Penn seems to treat that period as almost an afterthought, which I found curious, as he was so detailed throughout the remainder of the book.

At any rate, Penn's writing style adds color to the black-and-white, shadowy Henry VII, explaining, for example, why he treated his daughter-in-law, Katherine of Aragon (wife of his son Arthur) so shabbily upon Arthur's death. One reading history about Katherine would think that Henry VII was being an absolute jackass when it came to keeping both Katherine and her dowry in England following Prince Arthur's death. But Penn looks at it from both sides, portraying Henry VII as a flesh-and-blood human being, rather than a miserly and disliked king.

Penn's treatise also does a terrific job of laying the groundwork for Henry VIII's story. Though Henry VIII is mentioned only occasionally in the book, his father's story, as detailed by Penn, provides a lot of justification for the family's need for a son (or two, or three) to secure the Tudor dynasty. Henry VIII's later actions were reprehensible, but in light of what his father went through, one can see why he was willing to kill and divorce to obtain a son.

Except for the fact that I would have liked more information about Henry VII's youth, I found "Winter King" to be a compelling and fascinating read; a book that breathes new life into a complex, though short-lived, royal dynasty.