cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Conviction of Richard Nixon: The Untold Story of the Frost/Nixon Interviews
eBook The Conviction of Richard Nixon: The Untold Story of the Frost/Nixon Interviews ePub

eBook The Conviction of Richard Nixon: The Untold Story of the Frost/Nixon Interviews ePub

by James Reston Jr.

  • ISBN: 0307394905
  • Category: Leaders and Notable People
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: James Reston Jr.
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Broadway Books; Reprint edition (May 27, 2008)
  • Pages: 208
  • ePub book: 1875 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1895 kb
  • Other: mbr lit docx azw
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 431

Description

Above all, the book sheds important light on Nixon's failure to rehabilitate his reputation after his 1974 resignation. Matthew Dallek, Washington Post. Regardless of how you view Watergate, Reston's bias is pretty obvious in the first few pages of the book.

The Nixon interviews were a series of interviews of former . President Richard Nixon conducted by British journalist David Frost, and produced by John Birt. They were recorded and broadcast on television and radio in four programs in 1977. The interviews became the central subject of Peter Morgan's play Frost/Nixon in 2006, and subsequently the 2008 film of the same name.

James Reston, J. was David Frost’s Watergate advisor for the interiews, and The Conviction of Richard . Originally written in 1977 and published now for the first time, this book helped inspire Peter Morgan’s hit play Frost/Nixon.

Originally written in 1977 and published now for the first time, this book helped inspire Peter Morgan’s hit play Frost/Nixon. Nixon saw it as a chance to redeem himself in the eyes of the public and probably thought he was bigger than life but he was dismantled over the days of the interviews.

James Reston, Jr. (born March 8, 1941) is a prolific American author of eighteen books and playwright of four plays. Reston was born in New York City and raised in Washington, . the son of journalist James "Scotty" Reston and Sally Fulton. He was awarded a Morehead Scholarship to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and earned his BA in philosophy there in 1963.

In 1977, historian James Reston Jr. helped prepare journalist David Frost for a series of interviews with Richard Nixon that resulted in the . Reston later chronicled the exchange in his book The Conviction of Richard Nixon. James Reston Jr. On The 'Frost/Nixon' Interviews. helped prepare journalist David Frost for a series of interviews with Richard Nixon that resulted in the former president's tacit acknowledgment of his involvement in the Watergate scandal.

Reston's splendid little book is a behind the scenes tour de force of the Frost-Nixon interviews.

The Watergate scandal began with a break-in at the office of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate Hotel on June 17, 1971, and ended when President Gerald Ford granted Richard M. Nixon a pardon on September 8, 1974, one month after Nixon resigned from office in disgrace. Reston's splendid little book is a behind the scenes tour de force of the Frost-Nixon interviews. was David Frost’s Watergate advisor for the interiews, and The Conviction of. . Even at the time, Reston recognized the historical importance of the Frost/Nixon interviews; they would result either in Nixon’s de facto conviction and vindication for the American people, or in his exoneration and public rehabilitation in the hands of a lightweight.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. The Watergate scandal began with a break-in at the office of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate Hotel on June 17, 1971, and ended when President Gerald Ford granted Richard M. Nixon a pardon on S. Nixon a pardon on September 8, 1974, one month after Nixon resigned from office in disgrace

The Watergate scandal began with a break-in at the office of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate Hotel on June 17, 1971, and ended when President Gerald Ford granted Richard M. Nixon a pardon on September 8, 1974, one month after Nixon resigned from office in disgrace. Effectively removed from the reach of prosecutors, Nixon returned to California, uncontrite and unconvicted, convinced that time would exonerate him of any wrongdoing and certain that history would remember his great accomplishments—the opening of China and the winding down of the Vietnam War—and forget his “mistake,” the “pipsqueak thing” called Watergate.In 1977, three years after his resignation, Nixon agreed to a series of interviews with television personality David Frost. Conducted over twelve days, they resulted in twenty-eight hours of taped material, which were aired on prime-time television and watched by more than 50 million people worldwide. Nixon, a skilled lawyer by training, was paid $1 million for the interviews, confident that this exposure would launch him back into public life. Instead, they sealed his fate as a political pariah.James Reston, Jr., was David Frost’s Watergate advisor for the interiews, and The Conviction of Richard Nixon is his intimate, behind-the-scenes account of his involvement. Originally written in 1977 and published now for the first time, this book helped inspire Peter Morgan’s hit play Frost/Nixon. Reston doggedly researched the voluminous Watergate record and worked closely with Frost to develop the interrogation strategy. Even at the time, Reston recognized the historical importance of the Frost/Nixon interviews; they would result either in Nixon’s de facto conviction and vindication for the American people, or in his exoneration and public rehabilitation in the hands of a lightweight. Focused, driven, and committed to exposing the truth, Reston worked tirelessly to arm Frost with the information he needed to force Nixon to admit his culpability. In The Conviction of Richard Nixon, Reston provides a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of his involvement in the Nixon interviews as David Frost’s Watergate adviser. Written in 1977 immediately following these celebrated television interviews and published now for the first time, The Conviction of Richard Nixon explains how a British journalist of waning consequence drove the famously wily and formidable Richard Nixon to say, in an apparent personal epiphany, “I have impeached myself.”From the Hardcover edition.

Comments

Stylish Monkey Stylish Monkey
Having followd the entire Watergate hearings in the 70's and read 4 subsequent books, I was expecting an exiting read - WRONG. The author exposes his bias right out the gate by slamming Bush's decition to go to war "under false pretenses". Then he proceeds to mock Colson's religious convictions. From there it's downhill all the way with most of the narrative outlining his personal brilliance. Too bad, the subject matter itself is interesting but history should be left to historians and not journalists. Luckly I only spent $4.00 on the book!
Tinavio Tinavio
I was really anxious to listen to this audiobook but I just could not maintain any real interest in the storyline. I thought it was hard to follow. If the actual interviews are on on the CD I didn't recognize them but I couldn't take anymore 1/2 through CD 3. I wanted to rehear the actual interview as it was broadcast. But there was way too much extraneous material that I found boring. Perhaps if I read the book it would have been better. Since I wanted to "listen" rather than "read" the fact that I disliked the narrator made my experience even worse as he just seemed to drone on. For my taste, the audio book was very disappointing and not recommended.
Gandree Gandree
James Reston's experiences preparing David Frost for the Watergate segment of his Nixon interviews may have been exciting for the college professor, but his tale is disjointed and badly in need of citations. It appears his manuscript went to print unedited.
Abandoned Electrical Abandoned Electrical
Wow, this guy really hates Richard Nixon. Regardless of how you view Watergate, Reston's bias is pretty obvious in the first few pages of the book. He also mocks Colson's Christianity (an act), and makes Nixon out to be a murderous dictator (Nixon's comment on carpet bombing, his involvement in secret wars in Laos and Cambodia,etc). In this book, it is evident that Frost and Reston showed that Nixon and his guys (Colson, Dean, Mitchell, Hunt) practiced a cover up of a botched break in. If Nixon had come clean early on, he may have been hurt politically, but the presidency would have been intact. Reston drones on how these crimes were clearly the most hurtful to American democracy, etc, and that every thinking American should have opposed Nixon. He also portrays Nixon as the worst type of leader and human. These later arguments did not convince me, as other reviewers clearly show. Nixon was a President who screwed up, and suffered his fate. Nixon's later books, and advice helped future presidents.

Again, this is an OK read about the Frost/Nixon interviews. If one can look past Reston's bias (big gulp), one might learn something about Watergate.
dermeco dermeco
This is a fast and entertaining read. Reston writes that people wondered whether David Frost was up to confronting President Nixon about his Watergate deceptions as Frost was seen as something of a charming lightweight. Frost bore down and did his homework and the result was a stunning success for Frost. Richard Nixon during these interviews came as close as he ever would to admitting his role. The book unpacks Nixon's patterns of defensiveness and sheds light on the psychological machinations behind those patterns. While this may seem like material that's been exhausted over the years, the insights are fresh and interesting.

I have one point of disagreement with the author. He says the interviews finished off any change of a Nixon rehabilitation. While it's true that Nixon never again held elected or appointed office, he wrote a number of foreign policy books, visited with world leaders and gave solicited advice to Bill Clinton, among others. Americans love a comeback and Nixon did live to enjoy some measure of restoration. I'm sure this exceeded what even he thought possible.

I watched the interviews in 1977 as I was in my last year of college. This book brings back the intrigue and the drama.
Ces Ces
I saw the wonderful play "Frost/Nixon," which is based on this book, and I loved it - very funny, totally compelling, with several great moments of pure theater. But the book is more satisfying, on many levels. For one, it's just a great story -- Reston knows how to keep your attention, and the quest to nail Nixon on camera is told like a courtroom thriller: will they or won't they convict him? And as well, Nixon is such a bizarre human being that even his throwaway comments are creepy and revealing (he seems to have been somewhat obsessed with "fornicating") - but he's a brilliant, wily strategist, which has its own fascinations. Beyond all that, THE CONVICTION OF RICHARD NIXON is a telling comment on how the boundaries of acceptable behavior have changed over the last few decades: Nixon's wrongdoings seem almost quaint compared to the kinds of things that are happening today. But it all began here (at least publicly), and Reston nails it - just like he helped nail Nixon the first time.

Highly recommended.
Kazijora Kazijora
Reston's splendid little book is a behind the scenes tour de force of the Frost-Nixon interviews. Coming into the interview many thought that Frost was not up to the task of breaking down a President that was known for his tenacious survival instincts. After all, Nixon survived crisis after crisis before he came to the Presidency in 1969, and if Frost and his crew had not done their research, this interview could have provided a launching pad for any future Nixon ambitions. Reston recounts how the Frost team combed over tons of Watergate evidence, and newly discovered tapes detailing what the President knew and when he knew it. After reading this book however, the reader is understandably confused as to what drove Nixon to give his final mea culpa. Reston reveals here that this mea culpa was not spontaneous as some would believe, but took place right after a break in the taping. Was the apology really heartfelt after a withering cross examination by Frost, or was this just another cold calculating Nixonian maneuver? Did Nixon intend to do this when he signed up for the interview in the first place? Reston does not reach a conclusion as to what Nixon was thinking at the time, but with any book about Nixon the truth is always a slippery thing indeed.