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eBook Happiness is like a Cur Dog: The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster ePub

eBook Happiness is like a Cur Dog: The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster ePub

by Nelson J. King

  • ISBN: 1449025471
  • Category: Leaders and Notable People
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Nelson J. King
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: AuthorHouse (September 25, 2009)
  • Pages: 300
  • ePub book: 1234 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1471 kb
  • Other: rtf docx azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 281

Description

Nelson "Nellie" King is the undisputed king of Pirates baseball lore.

Nelson "Nellie" King is the undisputed king of Pirates baseball lore. Nelson King was one of the many baseball cards I collected during the 1950s and I also remember hearing him along with "The Gunner" Bob Prince doing Pirates' games during the Bucs' glory years.

With a raconteur's wit and keen eye for detail, Nelson "Nellie" King spins tales of his journey in professional baseball. From the farm teams of the deep south in the early 1940s, to the pitcher's mound, and then to the Pirates' broadcasting booth in the 1970s, King provides readers with a front row seat to the momentous changes he witnessed in his beloved game.

Nellie King's 30-Year Journey as a Pittsburgh Pirates Pitcher and Broadcaster. All book proceeds benefit "The Nellie King Fund", a charitable fund begun by Nellie's family via The Pittsburgh Foundation to assist underprivileged student-athletes and aspiring sports journalists.

Are you sure you want to remove Happiness is like s cur dog from your list? . the thirty-year journey of a Major League pitcher and broadcaster. There's no description for this book yet.

Are you sure you want to remove Happiness is like s cur dog from your list? Happiness is like s cur dog.

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout).

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner.

keen eye for detail, Nelson Nellie King spins tales of his journey in professional baseball. The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster.

book by Nelson J. King. Happiness Is Like a Cur Dog : The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster.

3. Description this book Please continue to the next pageRead Happiness is like a Cur Dog: The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster Download by - Nelson J. King TXT,open Happiness is like a Cur Dog: The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster Download by - Nelson J. King Kindle,open EBook.

Nelson Joseph "Nellie" King was an American professional baseball pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates . In 2009, he published a book titled Happiness Is Like A Cur Dog: The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster

Nelson Joseph "Nellie" King was an American professional baseball pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, and later a member of the Pirates" radio announcing team with Bob Prince. In 2009, he published a book titled Happiness Is Like A Cur Dog: The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster. On August 11, 2010 King died after a battle with Parkinson"s disease. He was hired as the third member of the Pirates" broadcasting team for the 1967 season, joining Bob Prince and Jim Woods.

Nelson Joseph "Nellie" King (March 15, 1928 – August 11, 2010) was an. . Personal information.

Nelson Joseph "Nellie" King (March 15, 1928 – August 11, 2010) was an American professional baseball pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, and later a member of the Pirates' radio announcing team with Bob Prince. Listed at 6 ft 6 in (. 8 m) in height, and weighing 185 lb (84 kg), King batted and threw right-handed. King and his wife, Bernadette, have three daughters and two grandchildren References.

In 2009, he published a book titled Happiness Is Like A Cur Dog: The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster Personal information. King and his wife Bernadette have three daughters and two grandchildren. Bats right, throws right.

With a raconteur's wit and keen eye for detail, Nelson "Nellie" King spins tales of his journey in professional baseball. From the farm teams of the deep south in the early 1940s, to the pitcher's mound, and then to the Pirates' broadcasting booth in the 1970s, King provides readers with a front row seat to the momentous changes he witnessed in his beloved game. The ball parks, dugouts, and road trips of yesteryear jump to life on these pages, as do the personalities of Pirate legends like Roberto Clemente, Bill Mazeroski, and Willie Stargell. King also has much to say about the business of baseball, from the expansion of franchises to dramatic salary increases. His humor, warmth, and insights will please die-hard Pirates fans as well as baseball history buffs.

Comments

WtePSeLNaGAyko WtePSeLNaGAyko
Rather than simply quote in my review what other reviewers say I will provide you with my own thoughts. Nelson King was one of the many baseball cards I collected during the 1950s and I also remember hearing him along with "The Gunner" Bob Prince doing Pirates' games during the Bucs' glory years. This is a life story of Nelson King who has lived a very interesting life. Following the death of his father the five year old King had to be sent to an orphanage by his mother because she had no financial means of taking care of him. King immediately grabbed my attention by stating that those who berate government assistance programs fail to realize that there was nothing during the Great Depression to assist those in need. Benefits that we now enjoy are taken for granted, as if they were always part of our lives. As a society we have become less tolerant and arrogant towards those who need our help.

King recounts his years making his way through the low minors in addition to his time spent in the military. His was no easy route in pursuit of his dream of pitching in the major leagues. He made his debut in fabled Ebbets Field in Brooklyn by striking out future hall of famer Duke Snider despite it appearing the distance to home plate appeared to be as though he was pitching from second base.

Arm trouble brought a premature end to King's career, and he eventually found his way into broadcasting reaching the pinnacle by teaming up with the legendary Bob Prince. King relates his experiences in the booth with Prince and his experiences with Roberto Clemente, Willie Stargell, Bill Mazerosksi, and others.

I did find a minor mistake in the spelling of the name of pitcher Arnold Portocarrero. Also, on page 214 King states that Yankees' announcer Jim Woods "moved across the Hudson River to do New York Giants games with another broadcasting legend, Russ Hodges. It should be the Harlem River and not the Hudson.

I found the book to be a quick interesting read. Every biography of a baseball player need not be of a superstar, and I enjoyed reading about players from Nellie King's era since it brought one of my early bubble gum cards to life.
blodrayne blodrayne
As a native Pittsburgher who has since moved around the US (too much), I look for ways to reconnect with home and this book immediately got my attention. Nellie King's years broadcasting for the Pirates (1967 - 1975) coincided with the beginning and heights of my being a baseball fan. He was a much-loved announcer alongside Bob Prince, with a knack for storytelling and enriching the play-by-play with his inside baseball knowledge. Nellie always came across as a nice guy, someone who would be easy to know. This wonderful autobiographical book is like a trip back over those years, and very like listening to Nellie on KDKA radio again. It ranges over a lot of baseball and broadcasting ground, through King's own playing years and that of the players and teams he encountered, and beyond. I have to say the title threw me for a while, but it refers to a story and advice given by Branch Rickey, the legendary GM for both the Pirates and the Dodgers, about the idea that you can't force happiness anymore than you can force a cur (mutt) dog to like or pay attention to you -- "if you go about enjoying and focusing on your work, happiness, like that dog, will remain there beside you." It's also a good book for those Pittsburgh fans who might want a reminder of how the Pirates rose to be competitive again in the 1950's after many rough years! Beat 'em Bucs.
RUsich155 RUsich155
Meaning that the Nellie King you will meet in this book sounds an awful lot like the Nellie King many of us grew up listening to on baseball and basketball broadcasts. He is straight-forward with his thoughts about people and subjects without being judgemental.

And, as he was as a broadcaster, in spots is overly-humble about his role and his place in Pittsburgh sports. He was never destined to be a Hall-of-Fame announcer, but was capable and enjoyment from his broadcasts over the decades never wavered.

His telling of stories such as his interview of Roberto Clemente on the day of the final game at Forbes Field shows he felt as much excitement (and honor) in doing the interview as we felt as listeners to his broadcast. Time after time in the book, Nellie gives us his view of something we heard him describe on radio -- and we find that what we originally heard was just how he saw it.

That in itself makes him stand out from many of today's broadcasters.

Bottom line: if you listened to Nellie King broadcast sports over the years, this book fits like a comfortable sweater....a great way to relax and re-live moments...through the eyes of the man who told us all about them as they happened.
Fecage Fecage
I grew up listening to Nellie King so I found it interesting but it wasn't as well written as it could have been.