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eBook Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865 (Collector's Library of the Civil War) ePub

eBook Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865 (Collector's Library of the Civil War) ePub

by Carlton McCarthy

  • ISBN: 0809442450
  • Category: Leaders and Notable People
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Carlton McCarthy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Time Life Books (October 1, 1982)
  • ePub book: 1976 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1241 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf lit docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 424

Description

The author, who fought as a private in the Army of Northern Virginia during the Civil War, describes the Confederate soldier’s daily struggles with hunger, illness, fear, and the perils of combat; as well as his pride of service, love of comrades, a. .

The author, who fought as a private in the Army of Northern Virginia during the Civil War, describes the Confederate soldier’s daily struggles with hunger, illness, fear, and the perils of combat; as well as his pride of service, love of comrades, and courage in the face of overwhelming odds (summary by D. Leeson). Download M4B Part 1 (103MB) Download M4B Part 2 (29MB).

Start by marking Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865 (Collector's Library of the Civil War) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Carlton McCarthy. This Civil War classic of soldiering in the ranks debunks all the romantic notions of war. Like his Northern counterpart, the Confederate soldier fought against bullets, starvation, miserable weather, disease, and mental strain. David Donald wrote in the New York Herald Tribune that McCarthy’s book, too, was "as fresh, as amusing, and as revealing" as the day it was first published in 1882.

The author, who fought as a private in the Army of Northern Virginia during the Civil War, describes the Confederate soldier’s daily struggles with hunger, illness, fear, and the perils of combat; as well as his pride of service, love of comrades, and courage in the face of overwhelming odds.

This Civil War classic of soldiering in the ranks debunks all the romantic notions of war. Like his Northern counterpart, the Confederate soldier fought against bullets, starvation, miserable weather, disease, and mental strain

This Civil War classic of soldiering in the ranks debunks all the romantic notions of war. But the experience was perhaps even worse for Johnny Reb because of the odds against him. Never as well equipped and provisioned as the Yankee, he nevertheless performed heroically. For weeks the army remained in camp. The routine of drill, sentry duty, and other activities droned on tediously. The hours passed so slowly that even the usual.

Army of Northern Virginia, History, Military life, Regimental histories, United States Civil War, 1861-1865, Confederate States of America. Civil War, 1861-1865. Carlton McCarthy (1847-). Genealogy & local history - LH15171. Personal narratives, Confederate.

The author, who fought as a private in the Army of Northern Virginia during the Civil War, describes the Confederate soldier’s daily struggles with . Army of northern virginia. By. Carlton mccarthy.

1861-1865 by Mccarthy Carlton in our library for absolutely free.

You can read Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865 by Mccarthy Carlton in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Under federal law, if you knowingly misrepresent that online material is infringing, you may be subject to criminal prosecution for perjury and civil penalties, including monetary damages, court costs, and attorneys’ fees. We check all files by special algorithm to prevent their re-upload.

By. Chapter I. We are familiar with the names and deeds of the generals, from the commander-in-chief down to the almost innumerable brigadiers, and we are all more or less ignorant of the habits and characteristics of the individuals who composed the rank and file of the grand armies of 1861-65. As time rolls on, the historian, condensing matters, mentions the men by brigades, divisions, and corps.

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The romance of war charmed him, and he hurried from the embrace of his mother to.The Confederate soldier opposed immense odds.

The romance of war charmed him, and he hurried from the embrace of his mother to the embrace of death. His playmates, his friends, and his associates were gone; he was lonesome, and he sought a reunion "in camp. He would not receive as gospel the dogmas of fanatics, and so he became a "rebel. Being a rebel, he must be punished. In the "seven days battles" around Richmond, 80,000 drove to the James River 115,000 of the enemy. At Fredericksburg, in 1862, 78,000 of them routed 110,000 Federal troops.

This Civil War classic of soldiering in the ranks debunks all the romantic notions of war. Like his Northern counterpart, the Confederate soldier fought against bullets, starvation, miserable weather, disease, and mental strain. But the experience was perhaps even worse for Johnny Reb because of the odds against him. Never as well equipped and provisioned as the Yankee, he nevertheless performed heroically. Carlton McCarthy, a private in the Army of Northern Virginia, describes the not-always-regular rations, various improvisations in clothing and weaponry, campfire entertainments, the jaunty spirits and the endless maneuvering of the men in gray. Real but forgotten faces are glimpsed momentarily in famous battles, and the tramp of feet on the way to Appomattox is heard. Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life does for the Confederate side what John Billingsâ?™s Hardtack and Coffee, also a Bison Book, does for the Northern. David Donald wrote in the New York Herald Tribune that McCarthyâ?™s book, too, was "as fresh, as amusing, and as revealing" as the day it was first published in 1882. In a new introduction Brian S. Wills considers the bookâ?™s niche in Civil War literature.

Comments

greed style greed style
Not really a narrative, more of a collection of vignettes on life as a common soldier in the Army of Northern Virginia. The author goes into considerable detail regarding what they wore, how they marched, what they ate, and many other insights into life from the Confederate side. Well worth the time of anyone with a passion for the American Civil War. By the time you have finished this book you will be fairly expert with regard to conditions in the Confederate Army. Definitely adds some needed insight into the conditions under which Robert E. Lee and his subordinates functioned.
VariesWent VariesWent
Full of good detail on the daily life and experiences of Confederate soldiers in the ANV. In many ways it is a Confederate version of Hardtack and Coffee. It was written well after the war and contains a certain amount of Lost Cause mythology common to the period. Modern readers may find some of it politically incorrect, but it is a window to see the views of both the period of the war and when it was written. Such things do not distract from the excellent details of military life.
olgasmile olgasmile
As a descendant of confederate veterans, as well as a sort of an amateur civil war historian, I find the insights this book gives to be fascinating. It covers many things most people don't think about, such as the near constant lack of food and need to forage, and the fact that they didn't use tents. It gives details and insights that one can only get from someone who was there and experienced it. This is an invaluable resource for anyone interested in the human side of this conflict. After reading this, I have to say that that it's amazing that they accomplished what they did with what they had. This book has given me a much deeper understanding of what my ancestors endured, and a greater respect for them as well.
Nidora Nidora
I found the book an easy read. It was informative to find out the day to day life of an average soldier in the Confederacy during the last part of the Civil War. In many ways though I wish the author would have been more specific with details, but I had to remember of the time (1882) in which he wrote. He was really a product of the time, the flowery language shows and I accept this. Still some of the descriptions seemed intentionally vague, as if he was scared at offending some one, or worse yet stirring up old emotions. I would however, recommend it to a person studying the day to day life of a soldier in the Army of Northern Virginia.
Syleazahad Syleazahad
I was expecting more detail...maybe more names...but it's an interesting read. Embossed leather cover and beautifully bound. Carefully packed and quickly shipped.
Agamaginn Agamaginn
I recently couldnt find my copy and I really loved that Time/Life had re-published the original. It's an interesting book but I bought it mainly because my great grandfather wrote it.
Fararala Fararala
If you want to understand the day to day of soldiering in the Confederate Army this is your book.
I am currently watching a Civil War DVD about the war details, and also comparing what I have been and am reading at the same time. This book was well worth my time to help put times in history in prospective. It will help all readers into the minds and times of what those Civil War experiences were actually like for the foot soldiers.