cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Universe.and Beyond
eBook The Universe.and Beyond ePub

eBook The Universe.and Beyond ePub

by Terence Dickinson

  • ISBN: 0921820518
  • Category: Memoirs
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Terence Dickinson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Camden House Pub; Revised, Expanded edition (November 1, 1992)
  • ePub book: 1722 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1999 kb
  • Other: lit mbr docx mobi
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 646

Description

Terence Dickinson is the best-selling author of 14 other astronomy books, including The Backyard Astronomer's Guide and Hubble's Universe

Terence Dickinson is the best-selling author of 14 other astronomy books, including The Backyard Astronomer's Guide and Hubble's Universe. He has received many national and international science awards, including the New York Academy of Science Book of the Year Award. Well, it's already happening. At least half a dozen of these shrines to the glory of the starry night have been established (see "Astronomy Conventions and Star Parties" in Chapter 13), and many more will surely follow in the decades ahead. Terence Dickinson Yarker, Ontario May 2006.

Terence Dickinson has produced another gem in Universe and Beyond, now in its fourth and .

Every page is full of visual impact both photographically and graphically. Each illustration is complemented with an in-depth caption. Peggy Dominy E-Streams). Terence Dickinson is the award-winning author of 14 astronomy titles, including NightWatch and The Backyard Astronomer's Guide, and more than one million copies of his books are in print. Series: Universe & Beyond (Quality).

The Universe and Beyond book. Award-winning astronomy writer Terence Dickinson takes readers on a factual journey in space and time from the Earth's surface to the most remote boundaries of the universe - and beyond.

Award-winning astronomy writer Terence Dickinson takes readers on a factual journey in space and time from the Earth's surface to the most remote boundaries of the universe - and beyond

Award-winning astronomy writer Terence Dickinson takes readers on a factual journey in space and time from the Earth's surface to the most remote boundaries of the universe - and beyond. This major revision of an astronomy classic features 50 new photographs and illustrations, including the latest images from the Hubble space telescope, the Galileo spacecraft and other NASA missions. Award-winning astronomy writer Terence Dickinson takes readers on a factual journey in space and time from the Earth's surface to the most remote boundaries of the universe - and beyond

Terence Dickinson has out done himself with his latest work.

The Universe and Beyond is a celebration of the human spirit of exploration. It is a majestic voyage to the most distant realms we can imagine. Terence Dickinson has out done himself with his latest work. Not since Sagan's Cosmos has the universe been explained in such a exciting and dymanic way. This is a wonderful merging of science fact, theory and imagination. The mental visualizations of journeys into the center of the Milky Way galaxy, over the event horizon and into a black hole and into the cosmic ocean of space and time stretch the human mind.

""The Universe and Beyond" is a celebration of the human spirit of exploration. Prepare yourself for a great adventure. Edward G. Gibson, Astronaut, Skylab 4 The Universe and Beyond is a factual, up-to-date guide to the universe, written by bestselling astronomy author, Terence Dickinson.

The Universe and Beyond is a fact-packed, up-to-date guide to the universe written by best-selling astronomy author Terence Dickinson.

Terence Dickinson CM (born 10 November 1943 in Toronto, Ontario) is a. .He is the author of 14 astronomy books for both adults and children. The Universe and Beyond.

Terence Dickinson CM (born 10 November 1943 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian amateur astronomer and accomplished astrophotographer who lives near Yarker, Ontario, Canada. He has made appearances at such places as the Ontario Science Centre.

Reviews current knowledge of the planets, galaxies, black holes, and quasars, discusses the possibility of extraterrestrial life, and looks at the origins of the universe

Comments

Dawncrusher Dawncrusher
(4.5 stars) In the last couple of years I purchased a few astronomy books, and this was one of them. Wishing to take a short break from the American West, I picked this book out of the pile and started reading a couple of weeks ago. This is the fifth updated version of this particular book, published in 2010. The sub-sections within chapters are generally only a few pages each which makes it easy to read in small segments which is what I like at the end of the day. The material is fascinating, there are many interesting images and the captions are very good too. Overall, the writing is easy to understand and, generally speaking, seems to be geared toward the "everyman" which I appreciate. Not knowing enough about astronomy I can't really comment on the accuracy of the writing, but Mr. Dickinson does appear to have a very good reputation in the field. There are times though when I wish I could ask Mr. Dickinson a question to clarify some point. For instance, on page 99 he writes that elliptical galaxies are the most populous type of galaxy in the universe. But then on page 109 he writes: "Galaxy collisions are relatively rare today [and that] most elliptical galaxies, it seems, are not born--they are merely heaps of stars from dismembered spiral galaxies." But if elliptical galaxies are more probably the result of two spiral galaxies colliding, then I'm not sure how he can say these collisions are rare today, yet still outnumber spiral galaxies. There must have been quite a few collisions in the past, so many that even with the few that occur today, they still outnumber spiral galaxies. I'm I understanding this right? Also, on page 104 he writes that if/when our Milky Way galaxy collides with the Andromeda galaxy that the earth probably won't be affected. Based on the tremendous amount of gravity that would disrupt our universe, I don't quite understand how that can be accurate, especially when on the same page he writes: "Even a close miss would twist off much of a spiral galaxy's twirling arms, although the nuclear region would remain essentially intact." Aren't we located in one of the spiral arms? I'm new to this topic so maybe my questions are academic and I just don't understand. I tried to find a way to contact the author but my Internet search came up empty. Still, this is a great book.

May 11, 2014
Finished this book this morning. While it would be great to chat with the author for occasional clarification or to answer a question, this is a first rate book. Especially enjoyed some of the closing chapters that deal with the possibility of extraterrestrials and how the universe will end. Plently of interesting information and lots of great photos. I feel like I accomplished something "smart" by reading this book. Highly recommended.
Jusari Jusari
A friend and I are taking an intro to astonomy course and this is one of the recommended texts. I can certainly see why. It's a very clearly written work with a heavy emphasis on planetary and solar astronomy and a lucid discussion of stellar objects visible with personal telescopes, subjects that the noviate astronomer is most likely to find of interest. The author also dedicates two chapters to the subject of theoretical astrophysics at the very basic level of cosmology, ie) the theory of the origin, the possible ultimate destiny of the universe, and the liklihood of the existance of coevil universes parallel to our own. Dickinson also throws his lot in with those who would believe in UFOs, to the extent that while he doesn't believe in the sightings people report--however well meaningly--he does believe that intelligent life is out there and may well already know of our existance. He gives a thorough and lucid outline of why he believes this to be the case. He also summarizes the SETI project and the ultimate change in position on this topic of high visibility astronomers like the late Carl Sagan, Iosif Shklovskii, and Ben Zuckerman. A very interesting book, and one that whets the appetite for further information.
Tantil Tantil
I love this book. My absolute favorite about the universe! It's written in such a way to be understood by the lay person with beautiful pictures. Highly recommend!
Ferri - My name Ferri - My name
That's the way Psalm 19 begins. It continues, "The skies proclaim the work of His hands. Day after day they pour forth speech; night after night they display knowledge. There is no speech or language where their voice is not heard." This book is graphic proof of those wise words, written 2,700 years before man came up with deep-space telescopes. As I study the photos in this book, it stretches my concept of God greatly. Look at one page, covered with so many stars that it would take a lot of time and patience just to count them in this "snapshot" of space, and you'll find the words of Psalm 147 mind-boggling: "He knows the number of the stars and calls them all by name." I treasure this book as an aid to contemplating the greatness of my God and Creator, the Lord Jesus Christ!
Laitchai Laitchai
Well laid-out book with awesome pics and logical flow. Definitely a professional work. It does not get very deep in explanations but there is enough material for a novice to get started. Overall: VERY GOOD!
fightnight fightnight
Any fan of Terrance Dickison astronmy books would be more than delighted with this addition to the library. Top notch all the way with tons of beautiful pictures!
Coirad Coirad
as advertised & good price
I have always been interested in astronomy and just recently picked it up as a hobby. Terence Dickenson does a wonderful job conveying concepts to the average person. He has made it so easy to understand and so interesting it is difficult to put the book down. The pictures are perfect for those of us with little imagination. My ten year old is even reading it with me. Excellent!