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eBook Keeper: A Book About Memory, Identity, Isolation, Wordsworth and Cake ... ePub

eBook Keeper: A Book About Memory, Identity, Isolation, Wordsworth and Cake ... ePub

by Andrea Gillies

  • ISBN: 1906021996
  • Category: Memoirs
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Andrea Gillies
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Short Books (2010)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1237 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1728 kb
  • Other: txt doc mbr docx
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 343

Description

The judges found it compelling. -Jo Brand

Keeper Andrea Gillies' brilliantly cogent investigations into the way Alzhei. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Keeper: A Book About Memory, Identity, Isolation, Wordsworth and Cake as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Keeper: A Book About Memory, Identity, Isolation, Wordsworth and Cake as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Are we more than just the sum of our memories? What exactly is the soul? Three years ago, Andrea Gillies, a writer and mother of three, took on the care of her mother-in-law Nancy, who was in the middle stages of Alzheimer's disease. This newly extended family moved to a big Victorian house on a headland in the far, far north of Scotland, where the author failed to write a novel and Nancy, her disease accelerated by change, began to move out of the rational world and into dementia's alternative reality.

Are memory and identity mutually dependent? What exactly is the soul? Three years ago, Andrea Gillies, a. .

Are memory and identity mutually dependent? What exactly is the soul? Three years ago, Andrea Gillies, a writer and mother of three, took on the care of her mother-in-law Nancy, who was in the middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease. This book is a journal of life in this wild location, in which Gillies tracks Nancy’s unravelling grasp on everything that we think of as ordinary, and interweaves her own brilliantly cogent investigations into the way Alzheimer’s works. For the family at the centre of this drama, the learning curve was steeper and more interesting than anyone could have imagined. Winner of the Orwell Prize 2010 and the inaugural Wellcome Prize 2009.

Can our personalities be taken away from us? Are memory and identity mutually dependent? What exactly is the soul? Three years ago, Andrea Gillies, a writer and mother of three, took on the care of her mother-in-law Nancy, who was in the middle stages of Alzheimer's disease.

Find nearly any book by Andrea Gillies. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Keeper: A Book About Memory, Identity, Isolation, Wordsworth and Cake.

Read "Keeper A Book about memory, identity, isolation, Wordworth and cake. This book is a journal of life in this wild location, in which Gillies tracks Nancy's unravelling grasp on everything that we think of as ordinary, and interweaves her own brilliantly cogent investigations into the way Alzheimer's works.

A Book About Memory, Identity, Isolation, Wordsworth and Cake . A Journey into Alzheimer’s.

A Book About Memory, Identity, Isolation, Wordsworth and Cake (London: Short Books, 2010). 2. All subsequent references to this work appear in the text. 13. These different stages are manifested in the patient’s changes in behaviour and neuropsychological symptoms (Almkvist 1996). Remind Me Who I Am, Again.

Keeper: A Book about memory, identity, isolation, Wordworth and cake? . Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine Paperback Book Free Shipping!

Keeper: A Book about memory, identity, isolation, Wordworth and cake? By Andrea. Worlds Apart Surviving Identity and Memory by Henry Pavlovich (English) Paperbac. Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine Paperback Book Free Shipping!

Can our personalities be taken away from us? Are memory and identity mutually dependent? What exactly is the soul? Three years ago, Andrea Gillies, a writer and mother of three, took on the care of her mother-in-law Nancy, who was in the middle stages of Alzheimer's disease. This newly extended family moved to a big Victorian house on a headland in the far, far north of Scotland, where the author failed to write a novel and Nancy, her disease accelerated by change, began to move out of the rational world and into dementia's alternative reality. This book is a journal of life in this wild location, in which Gillies tracks Nancy's unravelling grasp on everything that we think of as ordinary, and interleaves her own brilliantly cogent investigations into the way Alzheimer's works. For the family at the centre of this drama, the learning curve was steeper and more interesting than anyone could have imagined.

Comments

Topmen Topmen
I read the British version. This is a memoir about caretaking a mother-in-law with dementia and her father-in-law suffering heart and mobility issues. Britain's social work support system seemed so much less than warranted, even inhumane, e.g., initiated support was often cancelled at the last moment; there seemed little support or intention to psychological support the caretaker and her family. The author's experience suggests that until she wobbled on the edge of a nervous breakdown, did the System provide respite over Christmas holidays. Instead of resting, the caretaker invited 200 friends and neighbors to a party! Perhaps my shock is due to cultural differences. Whether or not the hostess engaged help, wasn't stated. That said, Keeper: Living With Nancy, is extremely well-written and appropriately won many awards and literary citations, including publication in four additional countries.. Dementia info is presented with examples of how changes in the work of famous artists reflected their ailment; this made receiving such sad info easier to take in and remember. Frankie Schelly, Author of Chance Place.
Blackseeker Blackseeker
I found this book to be informative, sad, funny at times, and hauntingly familiar......as my mother has Alzheimer's........and I struggled with some of the same crazy happenings. I have read many other books about dementia.....but this one weaves the facts into the book in such a way that I wasn't bored by them...but learned a lot..........I would recommend this book HIGHLY.......and I do.....to not only caregivers of dementia patients......but to anyone who wants to learn more, or just be taken away and live Andreas life.......and say...WOW.....could I do that?
Purebinder Purebinder
The perfect voice for this narrative: very honest, (mostly) likeable and very precise in her descriptions. If you have any interest in the effects of dementia on both victims and carers you must read this book.
GAMER GAMER
I would highly recommend this book to anyone who has a family member suffering from dementia or alzheimers. Very informative.
Brakree Brakree
I found this book compulsive reading and that's certainly a tribute to Andrea Gillies's narrative skill. It was not attractive and it was not comfortable and she (and her family) certainly won my admiration for their tenacity and honesty in the daily slog of caring for a very distressed sufferer in the later stages of Alzheimers. I couldn't help wondering whether they'd gone on too long (not that there was necessarily a choice) and I'd love to have known how the children felt about watching their grandparents deteriorate so unpleasantly. I was grateful for Andrea Gillies's thorough research though it wasn't easy to take in all the detail of the different brain areas on a first read so I'll need to go back.
Frey Frey
A very well researched book and a great memoir told. I would however have liked an editor to actually have proofread the book before publishing it. There are so many typos, and things that would have picked up by a simple computer spell check (e.g. 'som body' instead of 'somebody', 'alz heimers' instead of 'Alzheimers', and at least a dozen more (and I haven't even finished the book yet). There's no excuse for an author being let down in this manner - whoever the editor is, he/she needs a good talking to.

Despite this, it's a great book and worth a read - just such a shame the editor was illiterate.
Mot Mot
Best book or maybe only good book I've read on Alzheimer's and what it's really like living with someone who has it. This book, not Alice Munro's stupid pablum, should have won the Nobel Prize. If, as a caregiver, you ever feel alone with the horror, just read this. She just gives you the facts. Her honesty is so refreshing. An antidote to all the BS you'll read about Alzheimer's and caregiving in the New York Times.
Searingly truthful & painful to read on all levels, for all readers but most especially if one has had a loved one go through & succumb to Alzheimers.
Ms. Gillies story is interwoven with neurophysiology and incisive deduction. She explores the mind, the self, the core of what we all are - and how this cruel disease robs the sufferer of every part of it. If you have cared for someone with this disease, you will relate to her account on many, many levels. Highly recommended.