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eBook The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story (Nova Audio Books) ePub

eBook The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story (Nova Audio Books) ePub

by Bruce Reizen,Michael Lewis

  • ISBN: 1567408567
  • Category: Professionals and Academics
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Bruce Reizen,Michael Lewis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Nova Audio Books; Abridged edition (October 1, 1999)
  • ePub book: 1473 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1851 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf docx mbr
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 113

Description

In "The New New Thing" Lewis focuses on Jim Clark's ascent in the world of Silicon Valley entrepreneurship and . I have read three Michael Lewis books, Liar's Poker, Flash Boys and The New New Thing so I obviously like Michael Lewis

In "The New New Thing" Lewis focuses on Jim Clark's ascent in the world of Silicon Valley entrepreneurship and Clark's persistent pursuit of the titular "new new thing. Explaining the how's, why's, and differences between the old way of doing things and the new (or new new) way of doing things can be tricky, because it assumes you have some understanding of how the old (or old old) way of doing things works. I have read three Michael Lewis books, Liar's Poker, Flash Boys and The New New Thing so I obviously like Michael Lewis. The general theme of these three books is the greed and corruption of our financial system.

In "The New New Thing" Lewis focuses on Jim Clark's ascent in the world of Silicon Valley entrepreneurship and .

Michael Lewis - one of my favourites - often centres his books around heroes - whether nice or nasty - and the New New Thing has his most blatant hero so far - Jim Clark.

Jan 20, 2018 Dianne rated it really liked it. Shelves: economics, non-fiction. Michael Lewis - one of my favourites - often centres his books around heroes - whether nice or nasty - and the New New Thing has his most blatant hero so far - Jim Clark. He is as repulsive as a hero gets, often confusing us with his selfish, ludicrous behaviour. Lewis falls for Clark like a high school sweetheart - blindly in love, yet somehow keeping enough of his senses to avoid being buggered to death. Jim Clark is a genius, and as such invites our sympathy. Having Hero Worshipping the Devil.

Much of The New New Thing, to be fair, is devoted to the Healtheon story I have read three Michael Lewis books, Liar's Poker, Flash Boys and The New New Thing so I obviously like Michael Lewis.

Much of The New New Thing, to be fair, is devoted to the Healtheon story. It's just that Jim Clark doesn't do startups the way most people do. "He had ceased to be a businessman," as Lewis puts it, "and become a conceptual artist.

More Praise for The New New Thing. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading. Maybe the best way to introduce it is to explain why I bothered to write it. In the second part of the 1990s Silicon Valley had the same se feel to it as Wall Street had in the mid-1980s. Finding the new new thing is as much a matter of timing as of technical or financial aptitude, though both of those qualities help.

Written by Michael Lewis, Audiobook narrated by Bruce Reizen. A Silicon Valley Story. Narrated by: Bruce Reizen. Length: 9 hrs and 26 mins. Categories: Business, Leadership.

Like those two books, The New New Thing shows how the pursuit of power at its highest levels can lead to the very .

Like those two books, The New New Thing shows how the pursuit of power at its highest levels can lead to the very edges of the surreal, as when Clark tries to fill out an investment profile for a Swiss bank, where he intends to deposit less than. 05 percent of his financial assets.

Books related to The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story. billion $ enterprises all!

Books related to The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story.

describes a vast paradigm shift in American culture: a shift away from conventional business models and definitions of success, and toward a new way of thinking about the world and our control over it.

In the weird glow of the dying millennium, Michael Lewis sets out on a safari through Silicon Valley to find the world's most important technology entrepreneur, the man who embodies the spirit of the coming age. He finds him in Jim Clark, who is about to create his third, separate, billion-dollar company: first Silicon Graphics, then Netscape - which launched the Information Age - and now Healtheon, a startup that may turn the $1 trillion healthcare industry on its head. Despite the variety of his achievements, Clark thinks of himself mainly as the creator of Hyperion, which happens to be a sailboat - not just an ordinary yacht, but the world's largest single-mast vessel, a machine more complex than a 747. Clark claims he will be able to sail it via computer from his desk in San Francisco, and the new code may contain the seeds of his next billion-dollar coup. On the wings of Lewis' celebrated storytelling, the listener takes the ride of a lifetime through this strange landscape of geeks and billionaires. We get the inside story of the battle between Netscape and Microsoft; we sit in the room as Clark tries to persuade the investment bankers that Healtheon IS the new Microsoft; we get queasy as Clark pits his boat against the rage of the North Atlantic in winter. And in every brilliant anecdote and character sketch, Lewis is drawing us a map of markets and free enterprise in the twenty-first century.

Comments

Thetalune Thetalune
Lewis has a genuine gift for taking complex concepts (as he did in Moneyball, Boomerang, and Liar's Poker) and breaking it down in a narrative format that manages to convey a maximum amount of meaning into the story. In "The New New Thing" Lewis focuses on Jim Clark's ascent in the world of Silicon Valley entrepreneurship and Clark's persistent pursuit of the titular "new new thing."

Explaining the how's, why's, and differences between the old way of doing things and the new (or new new) way of doing things can be tricky, because it assumes you have some understanding of how the old (or old old) way of doing things works. I'm not a Wall Street investor, but I felt not only capable of understanding Lewis' framework of explanation, but I felt like I could extrapolate deeper meaning from it. He manages to paint fascinating pictures of all the people involved in the pursuit of the new new thing and how their constellation manages to orbit itself as it becomes standard operating practice in the growing tech industry.

I also felt like I could better understand how the minds of billionaire "executives" (as Lewis points out, Jim Clark wasn't exactly sure how to describe exactly what it was he does) and how they anticipate the next new new thing, why it interests them, and how quickly it starts to lose their interest. If you can understand someone like Clark, you can start to understand the industry.
Twentyfirstfinger Twentyfirstfinger
It is difficult to rate this book. While it is entertaining and somewhat informative and Michael Lewis writes well and tells a good tale--I've read nearly all his books--this is still his WORST book.

Does that that mean I wouldn't recommend it? No! I still liked it, and would recommend it as a "good" read, I was disappointed because I expect a "great" read from this author.
Eigeni Eigeni
This book was a 'can't put it down' experience for me, with big, earth shaking events happening in the history story I read. Even people and companies who were outside the rarified circle described in the book were also infused with a powerful sense of direction, purpose, and energy that resulted from being in an environment that practically SCREAMED more, faster, and better. I really liked this book! Brought back memories of a time in my life when I was crazy busy and seriously happy.
Iraraeal Iraraeal
Fealt like a school age crush on a vapid powerful man, devoid of any humanity - I resented getting to know him and his version of what matters
Conjuril Conjuril
y least favorite of the in-depth Lewis books, but that's not saying much. Unlike Liar's Poker, which Lewis thought would bring sweeping change by bringing some sketchy practices to light but still rings true, The New New Thing feels dated now, 10 years later. Nonetheless, as someone who understood the late 1990s tech boom only peripherally, this book was insightful, both in terms of those companies' business models (or lack thereof, as the case may be) and some of the relevant personalities. (Still important: Larry Ellison, John Doerr)

Although I doubt commercial interest warrants, this book could use an updated epilogue, particularly surrounding Healtheon/WebMD, which I have to think does not at all match the original vision.

As usual, very well written and engaging; always the case with Lewis. I didn't find Jim Clark as sympathetic as I think I was intended to, and as a result some of the chapters focused on him personally (especially his flying a helicopter, and sailing his boat across the Atlantic) dragged a bit.
Visonima Visonima
I have read three Michael Lewis books, Liar's Poker, Flash Boys and The New New Thing so I obviously like Michael Lewis. The general theme of these three books is the greed and corruption of our financial system.

One reviewer felt that Jim Clark was deified and no negative information was given but I disagree with that assessment. I saw Clark as a man with above average talent who learned to game the system to become super rich. It is sad to see someone with lots of money...all he will ever need for several lifetimes...who can't be content because he "needs" to have a larger number.
Kadar Kadar
It's true: this book IS mostly about Hyperion, Jim Clark's huge sailboat, but then again, the book is mostly about Clark himself. If you know how Lewis writes, it's a thread here and there, that weave and become this lively patchwork of ideas and facts, and, in the end, you have a profile of the Valley and one of the main characters that created its allure.
Lewis is a master of engaging character portrayals, with intoxicating and hyperbolic prose. He plays objective narrator throughout, sometimes interfering with the plot, but holds no punches in describing Clark's maniacal quest for wealth.
In the end, there is a wonderful demonstration that wealth doesn't bring happiness with it. From p. 258: "Why do people perpetually create for themselves the condition for their own dissatisfaction?" -- an retort to Clark's statement that "Once I have more money than Larry Ellison, I'll be satisfied". A few years earlier, satisfaction for Clark amounted to a measly $10 million on the bank; that number mushroomed to $1 billion.
Throughout, Lewis conveys the feeling of the Internet bubble of the late 90s; the wealthy, controlling venture capitalists; the insanely-priced IPOs for companies that had no clue how to make money. So yes, that's all a bunch of old old things by now, and if I were looking for a historical account of that period, the book would be worth only 4 stars; yet, I was going for the portrait of Clark, and for those who lived through it, the book is a good behind the scenes look at the creation of Silicon Graphics, Netscape, and Healtheon.